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‘Catholic Forum’ show to recall one of its founders

July 23rd, 2016 Posted in Entertainment Tags: ,

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The late Dorothy Arthur, one of the founders of “Catholic Forum,” the radio program-podcast produced by the Office of Communications of the Diocese of Wilmington since 1939, will be remembered on the show’s Aug. 7 broadcast.

The program, heard Sunday mornings on WDEL AM and FM in Wilmington; WAAI FM in Hurlock, Md.; and by podcast, has a diverse schedule of topics to finish up the summer season.

The following is a list of “Catholic Forum” topics and guests through August.

  • July 24: Author Julie Cragon will discuss her book, “Visiting Mary: Her U.S. Shrines and Their Graces.”
  • July 31: Local author Michele Chynoweth will discuss her latest novel, “The Runaway Prophet,” a modern-day thriller based on the Bible’s Book of Jonah.
  • Aug. 7: Listeners will hear a tribute to A. Dorothy Arthur, one of the founders of “Catholic Forum” in 1939, who passed away last month at the age of 95. The tribute will include an interview that was recorded in 2014.
  • Aug. 14: “Catholic Forum” presents Michael Davidson and Margaret Consiglio from the Cathedral of St. Peter, who will discuss the historic church as it celebrates its 200th anniversary.

• Aug. 21: Dr. Lou De Angelo, superintendent of schools for the Diocese of Wilmington, will discuss Catholic schools in Delaware and Maryland’s Eastern Shore as students and parents prepare to begin the school year.

  • Aug. 28: Author and Mother Teresa expert Susan Conroy will discuss the life and legacy of the saintly woman who will be canonized on Sept. 4 in Rome.

Available on air, online and on demand, Catholic Forum airs Sunday mornings at 9:05 on WAAI 100.9FM and on www.1009purecountry.com; and at 10:05 on WDEL 101.7FM and 1150AM and www.wdel.com.

 

The program is available as a podcast at http://catholicforumradio.libsyn.com/ and by searching “Catholic Forum Radio” on iTunes©.

 

 

 

Cardinal calls Christians to be like St. Mary Madalene on her feast day

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Christians are called to be like St. Mary Magdalene, who adored Christ upon finding him, an action that has somewhat lost its meaning in the church, said Cardinal Robert Sarah, prefect of the Vatican’s Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments.

St. Mary Magdalene is depicted in a stained glass window in the Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Boston. Pope Francis has raised the memorial of St. Mary Magdalene to a feast that is celebrated July 22 on the church's liturgical calendar. (CNS photo/ Gregory L. Tracy, The Pilot)

St. Mary Magdalene is depicted in a stained glass window in the Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Boston. Pope Francis has raised the memorial of St. Mary Magdalene to a feast that is celebrated July 22 on the church’s liturgical calendar. (CNS photo/ Gregory L. Tracy, The Pilot)

He said the July 22 feast of St. Mary Magdalene also serves as a reminder of the need to recuperate “the primacy of God and the primacy of adoration in the life of the church and in liturgical celebrations.”

“I believe, and I say so humbly, that we Christians perhaps have lost a bit the meaning of adoration. And we think: We go to church, we gather together like brothers, and it is good and beautiful. But the center is there where God is. And we adore God,” he wrote in an article published July 21 in the Vatican newspaper, L’Osservatore Romano.

Pope Francis raised the memorial of St. Mary Magdalene to a feast on the church’s liturgical calendar June 10 in a decree, “Apostolorum Apostola” (“Apostle of the Apostles”) which formalized the decision and was published by the Congregation for Divine Worship.

While most liturgical celebrations of individual saints during the year are known formally as memorials, those classified as feasts are reserved for important events in Christian history and for saints of particular significance, such as the Twelve Apostles.

As the first to announce Jesus’ resurrection to the apostles, Cardinal Sarah wrote, St. Mary Magdalene was “a witness of divine mercy,” and her feast day can help men and women deepen their roles as followers of Christ through adoration and mission.

Adoration, he continued, is what is most important and “not the songs or rites, as beautiful as they are.”

“What does it mean to adore God then? It means to learn to be with him, to stop in order to speak with him, to feel that his presence is the most true, the most good and the most important of all,” he wrote.

Citing St. John Paul II’s writings on the 25th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council’s Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, “Sacrosanctum Concilium,” Cardinal Sarah highlighted the need “to give God the first place” in order to encounter Christ, his mercy and his love.

“Mary Magdalene is the first witness of this dual behavior: to adore Christ and to make him known,” he wrote. By centering “our lives on Christ and on his Gospel,” Cardinal Sarah said Christians can model themselves after the “apostle of the apostles” who “comes out of herself to go toward Christ through adoration and mission.”

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

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‘Star Trek Beyond’ — Franchise arrives at its 13th frontier

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Catholic News Service

Fifty years after its debut on television, “Star Trek” bursts onto the big screen again in its 13th feature-film outing.

Chris Pine, Sofia Boutella and Anton Yelchin star in a scene from the movie "Star Trek Beyond."  (CNS photo/Paramount)

Chris Pine, Sofia Boutella and Anton Yelchin star in a scene from the movie “Star Trek Beyond.” (CNS photo/Paramount)

While the bad luck dreaded by triskaidekaphobes fails to curse the aesthetics of this latest production, there is an unwelcome, though fleeting, development in the moral realm.

Overall, “Star Trek Beyond” is a rousing and rambunctious 3-D adventure, directed at a furious pace by Justin Lin. That seems natural enough, given that Lin is perhaps best known for helming several of the films in the “Fast & Furious” franchise.

Here, with nary an automobile in sight, Lin embraces the universe as his canvas and makes the most of it. He stages thrilling scenes of galactic peril, including the wholesale destruction of the Starship Enterprise.

Fortunately, screenwriters Doug Jung and Simon Pegg (who plays Chief Engineer Scotty) allow viewers to pause and catch their breath, interspersing quieter scenes of the crew members bonding for character development.

Fatigue and malaise have struck the denizens of the Enterprise at the midpoint of their five-year mission. The captain, James T. Kirk (Chris Pine), is jaded and restless. The romance between Cmdr. Spock (Zachary Quinto) and Lt. Uhura (Zoe Saldana) has waned. Ship’s doctor “Bones” McCoy (Karl Urban) is crankier than ever.

In a twist that has made headlines, helmsman Sulu (John Cho) is revealed to be gay. In a brief scene, he’s shown with a male partner and young daughter. The casualness with which this situation is treated is itself part of an underlying agenda.

The Enterprise docks at a floating metropolis called Yorktown for a refit. There Kirk receives his next mission: A distress call in an uncharted part of the galaxy, ergo, “beyond” must be answered.

It’s a trap, of course, and before you can say, “Beam me up, Scotty,” the ship is destroyed and the crew taken hostage on a hostile planet.

A reptilian megalomaniac named Krall (Idris Elba) is to blame. He seeks the wholesale destruction of humanity (of course) through use of the ultimate weapon (what else?).

Krall’s motives and true identity are revealed in due course. In the meantime, it’s up to Kirk to rally his troops and stage a counterattack against overwhelming odds.

“We will do what we have always done,” says Spock. “We will find hope in the impossible.”

Luckily there’s also a friendly zebra-striped alien named Jaylah (Sofia Boutella) waiting in the wings with a bag of tricks. When she’s not too busy smacking down the baddies, Jaylah likes to fix things and make eyes at Scotty.

“Star Trek Beyond Comprehension” might be a better title for a film so crammed with technical jargon and nostalgic references that only diehard Trekkies will fully understand. Even for those outside that category, however, this could normally be endorsed as a fun summer popcorn movie, though its action is too intense for kids.

Yet, the film climbs aboard the gay-pride bandwagon (which nowadays often feels more like a juggernaut) and embraces an undiscriminating attitude toward actions incompatible with a Gospel-based lifestyle.

Many grown moviegoers may, in reality, be prepared to take this (admittedly incidental) element of the picture in stride. Given the broad cultural impact this widely loved franchise is capable of exerting, though, and the clear intent to make a statement with the scene in question, the restrictive classification assigned below seems necessary as a warning, if nothing else.

The film contains considerable, mostly bloodless violence, including torture, a benign view of homosexual acts and a fleeting sexual reference. The Catholic News Service classification is L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13.

McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.

 

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‘Lights Out’ looks for humor in haunting

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Catholic News Service

Viewers may find themselves giggling at “Lights Out.” But it won’t be because this feeble horror film has scared them silly.

Gabriel Bateman and Teresa Palmer star in a scene from the movie "Lights Out." (CNS photo/Warner Bros.)

Gabriel Bateman and Teresa Palmer star in a scene from the movie “Lights Out.” (CNS photo/Warner Bros.)

Injecting humor into the haunted house scenario, screenwriter Eric Heisserer and first-time director David F. Sandberg undercut the expected terror from things that go bump in the night. The result is pedestrian, predictable, and inspires few chills.

Young Martin (Gabriel Bateman) has a better reason than most 10-year-olds for not being able to get to sleep. His demented mother, Sophie (Maria Bello), is camped out nightly in her dark bedroom with her best friend, a feral creature named Diana (Alicia Vela-Bailey). Zombielike Diana is repelled by light, which is why Martin sleeps with a flashlight.

The backstory reveals that Sophie and Diana met as children, when both were committed to a mental institution. Diana contracted a rare skin disease which rendered her hideous and, ultimately, invisible. It was also fatal or so the doctors thought.

Fast forward 20 years, and Sophie is twice married, off her meds, and acting strangely when the sun goes down.

As the body count starts to rise in the dead of night, Sophie’s estranged daughter, Rebecca (Teresa Palmer), enters the picture. She left home years ago to escape Mommie Dearest (sorry, wrong movie), but is now determined, with the aid of her lovesick boyfriend Bret (Alexander DiPersia), to rescue her brother.

At a brisk 81 minutes, “Lights Out” doesn’t unduly tax viewers’ patience. Unfortunately, the film’s ending is not only unexpected and shocking, it’s also morally unacceptable.

Were the context any less remote from real life, the movie would have to be considered unsuitable for all. As it is, the otherworldly situation within which the climactic misdeed is committed diminishes its likely influence, meaning that at least a few well-grounded grownups may choose to witness it.

The film contains occasional bloody violence and scary imagery, a suicide, implied nonmarital sexual activity, drug use and some crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13.

McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.

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‘Fair way’ to support a good cause

By

Dialog reporter

CYM shoots a ‘24’ in its golf outings that help fund youth activities

CHRISTIANA – A relentless sun could not keep more than 100 men and women from teeing off at Cavaliers Country Club for the 24th annual Catholic Youth Ministry (CYM) golf tournament on July 18. One of those starting at the first hole has been there from the beginning and is glad to be able to support young people in the diocese.

Tom Sweeney, 79, was there with longtime tournament partners Fran Trzuskowski and Jim Keegan. He said he hasn’t played as much golf recently as he normally does, but he was happy to be at Cavailers and to see so many new faces.

“It’s great to get the young people out,” he said. Read more »

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Criminal charges dropped against Minnesota archdiocese, archbishop admits failure to protect children

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By Catholic News Service

St. PAUL, Minn. — Standing before reporters and cameras July 20, Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda said the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis failed in its handling of the case of Curtis Wehmeyer, a former priest who pleaded guilty in two courts of abusing three brothers while pastor of Blessed Sacrament in St. Paul.

Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda of St. Paul and Minneapolis addresses the media at a news conference July 20. He announced the Ramsey County Attorneyís Office in St. Paul has dismissed criminal charges alleging the Minnesota archdiocese failed to protect children in the abuse case of former priest Curtis Wehmeyer. (CNS photo/Dave Hrbacek, The Catholic Spirit)

Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda of St. Paul and Minneapolis addresses the media at a news conference July 20. He announced the Ramsey County Attorneyís Office in St. Paul has dismissed criminal charges alleging the Minnesota archdiocese failed to protect children in the abuse case of former priest Curtis Wehmeyer. (CNS photo/Dave Hrbacek, The Catholic Spirit)

“We failed to give priority to the safety and well-being of the children he hurt over the interests of Curtis Wehmeyer and the archdiocese,” Archbishop Hebda said. “In particular, we failed to prevent Curtis Wehmeyer from sexually abusing children. Those children, their parents, their family, their parish and others were harmed. We are sorry. I am sorry.”

The archbishop’s statement followed the announcement that the Ramsey County Attorney’s Office, under the leadership of Ramsey County Attorney John Choi, had dismissed criminal charges filed last year against the archdiocese, and the parties had amended a settlement agreement they reached in December on a related civil petition.

“Words are not enough,” Archbishop Hebda acknowledged. “We must, we will and we are doing better. Far-reaching changes are underway.”

He pointed to the archdiocese’s inclusion of more laypeople in its safe environment protocols, as well as the impact of Ramsey County’s oversight of the archdiocese’s policies and procedures and compliance with them.

“Over the past year, we worked with Mr. Choi and his team to define how the archdiocese can best create and maintain safe environments for children in our parishes, schools and communities,” he said. “Over the past six months, we have demonstrated our commitment to that path. Today, we humbly acknowledge our past failures and look forward to continuing down that path to achieve those vital, common goals that together we all share.”

Janell Rasmussen, archdiocesan deputy director of ministerial standards and safe environment, noted that since the agreement was reached, archdiocesan leaders have been working closely with Choi and his team and will continue to seek their advice and assistance.

Describing the day as one of “solemn reckoning and self-assessment,” Rasmussen said their work will never be done. “Today, tomorrow and every day we will ask ourselves, ‘Are we doing all we can to make sure children are safe?’”

In June 2015, the Ramsey County Attorney’s Office, whose jurisdiction includes St. Paul, filed criminal charges and a civil petition against the archdiocese, alleging it failed to protect children in its handling of Wehmeyer’s case. The charges included three counts of contributing to the need for protection or services, and three counts of contributing to a juvenile’s delinquency.

In the summer of 2010, Wehmeyer, then a priest of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis and pastor of Blessed Sacrament in St. Paul, sexually abused two brothers, ages 12 and 14, in a camper trailer he had parked on parish grounds and on a camping trip.

The boys disclosed the abuse two years later, and Wehmeyer was removed from ministry. In 2013, their older brother revealed that he, too, had been abused by the priest during a camping trips in 2008, 2009 and 2011. In several instances of the abuse, Wehmeyer provided alcohol or marijuana to the boys.

Wehmeyer pleaded guilty in 2013 of sexually abusing the two younger brothers in 2010. He also pleaded guilty in August 2015 in a Wisconsin court of sexually assaulting the third brother on a camping trip. Pope Francis dismissed him from the clerical state in 2015, meaning he can no longer exercise priestly ministry or present himself as a priest. He is currently in prison.

The Ramsey County charges alleged that the archdiocese had information that should have prompted its leaders to remove Wehmeyer from ministry before Archbishop Harry Flynn appointed him administrator of Blessed Sacrament in 2006, and it did not follow its own protocols, despite known instances of Wehmeyer’s “risky behavior” and violations of safe environment standards.

Ten days after the charges were filed, Archbishop John C. Nienstedt, who had led the archdiocese since 2008, and Auxiliary Bishop Lee A. Piche resigned, citing the need to step down to allow healing to begin in the archdiocese as leaders of the archdiocese.

Pope Francis appointed Archbishop Hebda, then coadjutor archbishop of Newark, New Jersey, to the temporary role of the archdiocese’s apostolic administrator alongside Auxiliary Bishop Andrew H. Cozzens. In March, the pope named Archbishop Hebda as head of the archdiocese, and he was installed in May.

“When I arrived here about a year ago, criminal and civil charges against the archdiocese had just been announced,” Archbishop Hebda said. “A decision had to be made: Do we fight the charges in court, which would have taken years of time and considerable resources, or do we work with the Ramsey County Attorney’s Office to try to make amends to those harmed and achieve justice for all in the broadest possible way. We chose the latter.”

He added: “Cooperation was the right avenue to achieve a just solution.”

In December, the archdiocese reached a settlement agreement with the Ramsey County Attorney’s Office on the civil petition, in which it agreed to continue child protection protocols it had already implemented as well as additional measures, and to Ramsey County’s oversight of its safe environment procedures for three years.

On July 20, the archdiocese presented a six-month progress report on its compliance with the agreement to Ramsey County District Court Judge Teresa Warner. Attorneys for the archdiocese and the Ramsey County Attorney’s Office described their strong, ongoing collaboration and affirmed the report satisfied the County Attorney’s requirements and demonstrated a significant effort to protect children.

Warner accepted the report and commended the work of the archdiocese and attorney’s office.

“What happened to kids in this case cannot be undone, but steps to work together … (are) significant,” she said. “You rolled up your sleeves, and you looked at what you could do to protect kids going forward.”

Assistant Ramsey County Attorney Thomas Ring noted that in the settlement, the archdiocese had agreed to take on “something more comprehensive than a court may have been able to offer.”

At a later news conference, Choi explained that a court likely wouldn’t have been able to mandate county oversight of the archdiocese’s protocol implementation due to laws separating church and state.

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St. Mark’s triple Olympian

By

Dialog reporter

Katelyn Falgowski, class of 2007, is a key player on the U.S. field hockey team’s quest for medal in Rio

MANHEIM, Pa. — Katelyn Falgowski played in a field hockey state championship match in high school and won two titles in college, but going for Olympic gold rises to another level.

“At the time, the high school one is awesome, and at the time, there’s no other thing than the NCAA, and now the Olympics is something you can’t even … it’s unimaginable,” she said. “We’re going to take it day-by-day and game-by-game, but I can tell you that I’m a happy crier, so there will be a lot of happy tears if we do how we’re hopeful of doing.” Read more »

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Indian bishop has dream of building a hospital in his diocese

By

Dialog Editor

Emerging threats to religious liberty have been a concern of the Catholic Church in the United States in recent years, but they are a daily challenge for Catholics in India.

When Bishop Jerome Dhas Varuvel of the Diocese of Kuzhithurai, India, visited the Diocese of Wilmington last week, he said the church in India routinely encounters government roadblocks in its ministry to the people. Read more »

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Former Our Sunday Visitor publisher named CNS director, editor-in-chief

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Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON — Greg Erlandson, former president and publisher of Our Sunday Visitor, has been named director and editor-in-chief of Catholic News Service (CNS), effective Sept. 12.

Msgr. J. Brian Bransfield, general secretary of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, announced the appointment July 20.

Greg Erlandson, former president and publisher of Our Sunday Visitor, has been named director and editor-in-chief of Catholic News Service, effective Sept. 12. (CNS /courtesy Greg Erlandson)

Greg Erlandson, former president and publisher of Our Sunday Visitor, has been named director and editor-in-chief of Catholic News Service, effective Sept. 12. (CNS /courtesy Greg Erlandson)

“Greg brings a remarkable combination of management expertise, journalism skills and demonstrated service to the church at the national and international level. I am confident he will prove to be an important resource to clients of CNS,” Msgr. Bransfield said in a statement.

Erlandson, 62, stepped down from his position at OSV in Huntington, Indiana, after nearly 27 years with the company. He was named OSV editor in 1989 and was promoted to editor-in-chief of its editorial operations in 1992. He was named president and publisher in 2000.

“CNS is one of the gifts of the U.S. church to the rest of the Catholic world,” Erlandson said in response to an email asking for comment. “It is an honor to follow in the footsteps of so many great directors of the news service, and I am humbled by the opportunity to join our colleagues at the bishops’ conference in serving our fellow Catholics.”

“Catholic News Service has for decades been the backbone of the Catholic press,” he said. “It has enabled diocesan media to have a dependable source of national and international news, of great columnists and great features. It has also provided timely and trustworthy reporting to a wide variety of Catholic publications and organizations as well as to bishops and communicators around the world.”

Erlandson worked for CNS from 1986 to 1989. After a brief time in the Washington office, he worked at the CNS Rome bureau until he left to become editor at OSV.

“So I expect to feel a little deja vu,” he said, calling his time with CNS in Rome “life-changing.”

“My years in Italy changed the way I viewed both my church and my country, and I will always be grateful for the opportunity Richard Daw (then-CNS editor-in-chief) made available to me,” Erlandson said.

Erlandson succeeds Tony Spence, who resigned in April after 12 years as editor-in-chief. James Rogers, USCCB chief communications officer, took over CNS administrative duties while a search process took place for a successor.

Msgr. Bransfield thanked CNS staff “for their focus and hard work during this period of transition” and thanked Rogers and the search committee for their work.

Erlandson studied journalism at the Graduate School of Journalism of the University of California at Berkeley. He received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English literature from Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. Early in his career, he was editor of the National Catholic Register.

Erlandson has had an active role as an advocate for the Catholic press. He served as president of Catholic Press Association of the United States and Canada from 2011 to 2013 and continued on the organization’s board after his term.

He has been appointed twice as a consultant to the USCCB’s Committee on Communications, and he has been a consultant for the Pontifical Council for Social Communications. He completed a stint in 2015 on a committee working to reform the Vatican’s communications arm that led to the creation of the new Vatican Secretariat for Communications.

In June, he received the Bishop John England Award from the CPA during the Catholic Media Conference in St. Louis. Last February, he was inducted into the Association of Catholic Publishers Hall of Fame for lifetime achievement. In 2015, he received the St. Francis de Sales Award, the CPA’s highest honor.

He and his wife, Corine Bischetti Erlandson, have four children.

 

 

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Atlanta archbishop to lead U.S. bishops’ new task force on race

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Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON — Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory of Atlanta has been appointed as chair of a new task force of the U.S. bishops to deal with racial issues brought into public consciousness following a series of summertime shootings that left both citizens and police officers among those dead.

Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory of Atlanta  has been named to lead a U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' task force to deal with racial issues. (CNS file / Michael Alexander, Georgia Bulletin)

Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory of Atlanta has been named to lead a U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ task force to deal with racial issues. (CNS file / Michael Alexander, Georgia Bulletin)

The task force’s charge includes helping bishops to engage directly the challenging problems highlighted by the shootings. Task force members will gather and disseminate supportive resources and “best practices” for their fellow bishops; actively listening to the concerns of members in troubled communities and law enforcement; and build strong relationships to help prevent and resolve conflicts.

“By stepping forward to embrace the suffering, through unified, concrete action animated by the love of Christ, we hope to nurture peace and build bridges of communication and mutual aid in our own communities,” said a July 21 statement from Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

In addition to creating the task force and appointing its members, Archbishop Kurtz also called for a national day of prayer for peace in our communities, to be held Sept. 9, the feast of St. Peter Claver.

Archbishop Gregory is a former USCCB president. Other task force members are Archbishop Thomas G. Wenski of Miami, chairman of the USCCB Committee on Domestic Social Development; Bishop Shelton J. Fabre of Houma-Thibodaux, Louisiana, chairman of the USCCB Subcommittee for African-American Affairs; Bishop Jaime Soto of Sacramento, California, chairman of the USCCB Subcommittee on the Catholic Campaign for Human Development; and retired Bishop John H. Ricard of Pensacola-Tallahassee, Florida, who is president of the National Black Catholic Congress.

The day of prayer, according to a July 21 USCCB announcement about the task force’s formation, will “serve as a focal point for the work of the task force.”

The task force’s work will conclude with the USCCB’s fall general meeting in November, at which time it will report on its activities and recommendations for future work.

“I have stressed the need to look toward additional ways of nurturing an open, honest and civil dialogue on issues of race relations, restorative justice, mental health, economic opportunity and addressing the question of pervasive gun violence,” Archbishop Kurtz said. “The day of prayer and special task force will help us advance in that direction.”

The task force will have bishop consultants, including Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, who is USCCB vice president, as well as bishops whose jurisdictions have experienced extreme gun violence, or who otherwise bring special insight or experience on related questions. An equal or smaller number of lay consultants with relevant expertise will be appointed soon thereafter, the USCCB announcement said.

“I am honored to lead this task force which will assist my brother bishops, individually and as a group, to accompany suffering communities on the path toward peace and reconciliation,” said Archbishop Gregory in a July 21 statement. “We are one body in Christ, so we must walk with our brothers and sisters and renew our commitment to promote healing. The suffering is not somewhere else, or someone else’s; it is our own, in our very dioceses.”

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