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Playoff pictures still unclear as soccer, football roll on

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Dialog reporter

 

Soccer begins its final 10 days of the regular season on Monday, while the football campaign enters week eight with a bunch of variables clouding the postseason picture. Read more »

Field hockey, volleyball enter final full week of regular season

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Dialog reporter

 

Field hockey enters its final full week of the regular season, although games will continue through Nov. 2. Volleyball wraps up on Saturday with a matinee featuring Ursuline and St. Mark’s, the fourth huge match of the week between Catholic schools. Read more »

DMA takes control in second half, Alleyne scores five times in win over Spartans

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Dialog reporter

 

WILMINGTON – St. Mark’s used an effective running game to take a 21-14 halftime lead on Oct. 21 against Delaware Military Academy. But the Seahawks made all the necessary adjustments during the intermission, and Corahn Alleyne scored three of his five touchdowns in the second half to lead DMA to a 33-21 win at Baynard Stadium.

Meanwhile, the Seahawks’ defense closed the holes that existed in the first half, shutting down the Spartans’ offense. Read more »

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Powerful Pandas sweep Auks in top-six volleyball battle

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Dialog reporter

 

CLAYMONT – A near-sellout crowd turned out at Moglia Fieldhouse on Oct. 20 to see top-ranked Padua take on No. 6 Archmere, and the visiting Pandas silenced the Auks’ faithful with a 3-0 sweep. Set scores were 25-14, 25-18, 25-18.

Archmere came out hot early, taking a 5-2 lead in the first. But the Pandas used contributions from their deep roster to take control. Jess Molen was scoring with regularity on kills, and she added a few aces, and Michelle Kozicki came on to pick up points on a kill and a pair of blocks. Emily Jarome then warmed up, and the defending state player of the year made her presence known over and over and over again as setter Emma Lucey went her way all night. Read more »

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Million’s play on both sides of ball help Sals to win over Colonials

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Dialog reporter

 

WILMINGTON – Garrett Million was feeling like a million bucks Oct. 20, scoring on a long run and a fumble recovery as Salesianum wrapped up a four-game homestand with an impressive offensive performance, defeating William Penn, 35-21. The Sals improved to 5-2 with the win.

Million’s backfield mate, Carson Salvo, was making noise on the first Sallies scoring drive early in the second quarter. Salesianum quarterback Zach Gwynn delivered a key play, scrambling for 12 yards on a fourth-and-10 from the Colonials’ 20. Caron Salvo picked up four yards on first down, setting up a controversial call on the next play. Read more »

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Medea’s ‘Boo 2!’ runs out of Halloween comedy and horrror

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Catholic News Service

There’s a brief moment in “Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween” in which one desperately hopes that the plot has flickered to life.

On a dark road near an allegedly haunted campground, writer-director Perry’s long-running muumuu-draped moral force, played by Perry in drag, of course, encounters the Grim Reaper, complete with scythe. Finally, she either ponders her own mortality, or “conquers” death with a well-placed punch, right?

Cassi Davis and Tyler Perry star in a scene from the movie “Boo 2! A Madea Halloween.” The Catholic News Service classification is A-III — adults. (CNS photo/Chip Bergmann, Lionsgate)

Nope. It’s just another tired sight gag.

She only realizes that the blade is razor-sharp and there’s no head underneath the shroud, screams in fright and piles back into her somewhat-legendary Cadillac, where she’s been puttering around with Aunt Bam (Cassi Davis), pal Hattie (Patrice Lovely) and brother Joe (also Perry) in search of the campsite and her great-niece, Tiffany (Diamond White).

Perry’s Madea films of late have operated not on strongly limned original ideas but on the fumes of public goodwill at the memory of the character’s earlier outings. In those, she at least had some moral lesson to convey about the power of family ties or the importance of children obeying their elders.

This second Halloween adventure, by contrast, is entirely along the lines of a live-action Scooby-Doo cartoon. Madea eventually gets a sort-of comeuppance. But her primary task here is to shriek and toss off the occasional line about urinary incontinence.

Nerdy divorced dad Brian (Perry again) – Joe’s son — struggles to be a good father to Tiffany on her 18th birthday. But he has to compete with ex-wife Debrah (Taja V. Simpson) and her new boyfriend, Quinton (Andre Hall), who give the teen a new car as a present.

Tiffany uses the occasion to get herself invited to a fraternity’s Halloween party at the aforementioned campground, where more than a dozen people were murdered some years before. Madea, convinced that Brian is not a sufficiently strong-willed parent, decides to “rescue” Tiffany but is clearly not up to the task.

She and her companions encounter chainsaw-wielding yobbos and a character costumed as the girl in the well from the “Ring” horror franchise, pretty much just screeching and pointing in response. As a result, “Boo 2!” never even comes close to the level of a competently made horror comedy.

The film contains a brief scene of marijuana use, fleeting crude language and two instances of the N-word. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III, adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13.

     

Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.

 

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‘Same Kind of Different as Me’ has its heart in the right place

October 20th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

Viewers committed to scriptural values will be inclined to cut the good-hearted but uneven drama “Same Kind of Different as Me” some slack.

A poster for the movie “Same Kind of Different as Me” is displayed in this promotional photo for the film. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III — adults. (CNS photo/Paramount)

Based on real-life events, the film recounts how wealthy art dealer Ron Hall (Greg Kinnear) came to form an unlikely friendship with Denver Moore (Djimon Hounsou), a volatile but fundamentally decent homeless man.

Anxious to repair the damage a recent affair has done to his marriage, Ron reluctantly agrees to accompany his spiritually attuned wife, Debbie (Renee Zellweger), on her visits to a local soup kitchen.

There he gradually overcomes the initial (and intimidating) hostility of his future pal, who is first seen wielding a baseball bat while making angry threats against the other beneficiaries of the charity. He also learns the details of Denver’s personal history.

So long as Hounsou dominates the scene, as he does while lyrically recalling his character’s childhood, his redoubtable talent carries the film along.

The other headliners of the cast, including Jon Voight as Ron’s booze-sodden estranged father, Earl, also bring formidable resumes to the project. But they prove less successful in overcoming the limitations of the script. It was adapted from the book, penned by Hall and Moore, by director Michael Carney, Alexander Foard and Hall.

A nondenominational religious subtext and Gospel-congruent values help to hide the aesthetic blemishes. They also contribute to making the movie probably acceptable for older teens, despite the elements listed below.

The film contains some nonlethal violence, a scene of marital intimacy, mature themes, including adultery and racial hatred, sexual references and innuendo. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III, adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13.

     

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

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Brown vetoes California bill that targeted religious employers’ policies

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Religious freedom advocates and pro-life leaders praised California Gov. Jerry Brown for vetoing a bill called the Reproductive Health Nondiscrimination Act that targeted religious employers and their faith-based codes of conduct for employees.

Pro-life groups are praising California California Gov. Jerry Brown for vetoing a bill that would prohibited religious employers from living out “their beliefs within their own organizations.” (CNS photo/Mike Nelson, EPA)

Assembly Bill 569 would have made it illegal for a California employer to discipline or fire employees for “their reproductive health decisions, including, but not limited to, the timing thereof, or the use of any drug, device or medical service.”

Alliance Defending Freedom said the bill would have prohibited churches, religious colleges, religious nonprofit organizations and pro-life pregnancy care centers “from having faith-based codes of conduct with regard to abortion and sexual behavior.”

The government “should not and cannot tell” employers that they cannot live out their beliefs within their own organizations, said Elissa Graves, legal counsel for the alliance, which is a nonprofit legal group that advocates for religious freedom and sanctity of life and on marriage and family issues.

“Gov. Brown was right to veto this immensely unconstitutional bill, which would have been an unprecedented overreach on the part of the state of California,” she added in a statement about the governor’s late-night action Oct. 15.

“The First Amendment doesn’t allow the state to order churches and other faith-based groups to violate their most deeply held convictions,” Graves said. “They have the freedom to live according to their faith and to require those who work for them to do the same.”

The California Catholic Conference, the public policy arm of the state’s Catholic bishops, called the measure “a massive overreach by NARAL” and an attack on religious liberty. NARAL Pro-Choice America advocates for legal abortion and for expanding access to it.

After A.B. 569 was passed by the California Legislature as its 2017 session ended Sept. 18, the Catholic conference urged Catholics to send a message to Brown calling for him to veto it.

It said the bill “deliberately” targeted religious employers “in a false effort to stop widespread ‘reproductive discrimination’ but supporters cannot cite a single case in California where such discrimination has actually occurred.”

“There are no substantiated claims of discrimination in the secular workforce against women who are pregnant or exercise ‘reproductive choices’ because such actions have been illegal for decades under the Fair Employment and Housing Act,” the conference said.

It noted the bill’s supporters could only point to one case in the state in the last decade “implicating a religious employer” and “that matter was settled out of court.”

“In a reach unknown in any other legal system, supporters (of A.B. 569) have expanded those who can allege discrimination in court to include anyone in the employee’s family and holds supervisors personally and legally responsible for enforcing the policy of employers,” the conference said.

“With no restraint in sight,” the conference said, the bill did not allow employers to enforce codes of conduct, “even those negotiated with employees as part of union contracts.”

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Vatican Letter: Pope Francis’ pro-life challenge: Respect all life, oppose death penalty

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis’ recent statement that the death penalty is incompatible with the Gospel focused less on a government’s role in protecting its people and more on the need to defend the sacredness and dignity of every human life. Read more »

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Father Greco, a priest of the diocese for 38 years, dies at 72

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Dialog reporter

Father Anthony F. Greco, a retired priest of the Diocese of Wilmington, died Oct. 15. He was 72 and had been a priest for 38 years.

Bishop Malooly will be the principal celebrant at the funeral Mass, which will be Oct. 23 at 10 a.m. at Our Lady of Good Counsel, in Secretary, Md. Read more »

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