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Golfers shoot a round for Catholic Youth Ministry

July 25th, 2014 Posted in Our Diocese, Youth Tags: , ,

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Staff reporter

 

NEWARK — As 120 golfers sat in their carts waiting to hit the links July 10 at Cavaliers Country Club to begin the annual benefit tournament for Catholic Youth Ministry, Bishop Malooly thanked them for supporting the young people of the diocese.

“The support for youth ministry is outstanding,” he said. “It’s really very important for our young people.”

Then the bishop gave a blessing that included the following: “Help them to add up correctly.” Read more »

Sustaining a future for people who have served the church

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Special to The Dialog

 

Kevin Scott doesn’t plan to retire anytime soon from St. Elizabeth School, where he went to grade and high school and returned to work in 1981.

Still, the parish-based high school’s development director knows that at some point he will probably have to retire. “It’s a comfort to know that the diocesan pension plan is in place and is healthy,” Scott said. “That’s something I can depend on.” Read more »

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Young people volunteer to help others during the summer at Pitcher and Basin

July 24th, 2014 Posted in Featured, Our Diocese, Youth Tags: ,

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For The Dialog

 

SALISBURY, Md. – John and Debbie Meyers sat in the living room of their home recently as a group of high school volunteers painted the front door, stairwell, and upstairs hallway and other teenagers groomed the Meyers’ yard.

“If they weren’t doing this, it wouldn’t get done,” Debbie Meyers said. She and her husband are both on disability and unable to do the work themselves. They also could not afford to have the work done. Read more »

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Maryland bishops seek compassion for children at U.S. border

July 23rd, 2014 Posted in Featured, Our Diocese

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The bishops of Maryland — Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore, Cardinal Donald Wuerl of Washington and Bishop W. Francis Malooly of the Diocese of Wilmington — issued the following statement on July 23:

The familiar words of Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew, “Whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me,” speak compellingly to us today as we witness the plight of the more than 50,000 unaccompanied children fleeing to our country to escape the violence and desperate poverty of their homelands.

Here in Maryland the Catholic Church stands ready to answer Jesus’ call to embrace the needs of these children and their families as we offer our welcome and assistance.

Immigrant families and immigration reform activists hold signs of protest during a July 7 news conference in Washington near the White House organized by Casa de Maryland and other pro-immigration reform groups. Several speakers at the event urged the Obama administration to provide relief for all children and their families who have crossed the U.S. border illegally to flee violence in Central America. (CNS photo/Chaz Muth)

Immigrant families and immigration reform activists hold signs of protest during a July 7 news conference in Washington near the White House organized by Casa de Maryland and other pro-immigration reform groups. Several speakers at the event urged the Obama administration to provide relief for all children and their families who have crossed the U.S. border illegally to flee violence in Central America. (CNS photo/Chaz Muth)

We cannot turn our back on these children. They are fleeing to us because they know there are warm hearts and helping hands in America – and for so many immigrants, a home in the Catholic Church, no matter where their journey takes them. We must not prove them wrong.

We also cannot ignore the complexities faced by national and local elected officials in determining a just and sustainable response to this humanitarian crisis. A delegation of U.S. bishops traveled to Central America in November 2013 to learn firsthand about the conditions causing this crisis, and have developed a resource that provides helpful background on this issue titled, “Mission to Central America: the Flight of Unaccompanied Children to the United States,” available at www.usccb.org.

Eradicating the root causes prompting this crisis, most especially the uncontrolled and terrifying violence of criminal gangs, demands challenging international solutions.

Ensuring that local communities in the United States are equipped to provide immigrant children and their families appropriate services, whether on a temporary or more long-term basis, will require a significant increase in available financial and human resources, and unprecedented cooperation among government and religious and nonprofit agencies.

We support efforts at the federal level to increase funding to provide the social and legal services necessary to serve the children seeking asylum. We too share a concern about the risk in sending these children back to uncertain or even dangerous situations in the lands they have fled.

We are also grateful that Governor O’Malley and other elected officials in Maryland have expressed a willingness to welcome to our state children who need assistance. Through our Catholic Charities and other social service agencies, our parishes, and the generosity of the many parishioners who call us daily asking how they can help, we will do all within our capacity to offer our longstanding expertise and support in helping these children and their families. Providing such help is no different than what the church has done without fail for centuries in Maryland to help those in need.

As our national and local governments continue to grapple with this difficult situation, we are hopeful that partisan differences will not stand in the way of finding a just and humane response to this urgent need. We pray that our country will be able to look back proudly at how we answered this call, and ask God to touch the hearts and minds of the people of Maryland and throughout America with compassion and generosity.

Most importantly, we entrust these children to God’s providence, for we know “You do see, for you behold misery and sorrow, taking them in your hands. On you the unfortunate man depends; of the fatherless you are the helper” (Psalm 10).

 

The bishops of Maryland — Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore, Cardinal Donald Wuerl of Washington and Bishop W. Francis Malooly of the Diocese of Wilmington — issued the above statement on July 23 through the Maryland Catholic Conference.  Maryland Catholic Conference advocates for the Church’s public policy positions before the Maryland General Assembly and other civil officials. The Conference represents all three dioceses with territory in the state – the Archdiocese of Baltimore, the Archdiocese of Washington, and the Diocese of Wilmington.  Approximately 1.2 million Catholics live in Maryland. www.mdcathcon.org    

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Golfers shoot a round for Catholic Youth Ministry

By

Staff reporter

NEWARK — As 120 golfers sat in their carts waiting to hit the links July 10 at Cavaliers Country Club, waiting to begin the annual benefit tournament for Catholic Youth Ministry, Bishop Malooly thanked them for supporting the young people of the diocese.

The support for youth ministry is outstanding,” he said. “It’s really very important for our young people.” Read more »

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Dinner, with a side of friendship: For eight years, St. Edmond’s Church has supported international students who work at state’s beaches

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For The Dialog   For eight years, St. Edmond’s Church has supported international students who work at state’s beaches   REHOBOTH BEACH — Chet Poslusny chatted with four students from Bulgaria, making them feel more at home by speaking in their native language. “He made my day,” said one of the students, Denis Ismet. He was surprised to meet someone who not only knew about Bulgaria but spoke the language. Read more »

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Catholic Appeal has exceeded its goal: Annual fundraiser is at $4.5 million with three months to go

July 10th, 2014 Posted in Featured, Our Diocese Tags:

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The 2014 Annual Catholic Appeal has surpassed its target of $4,347,000 by more than $186,000 with a total of $4,533,436 pledged as of July 7, the diocesan Development Office reported this week.

“The Annual Catholic Appeal is an opportunity for each of us to unite as a Catholic community and to answer the needs of those most vulnerable – the hungry, the homeless, the unemployed, the distressed, the unchurched, our children and our elderly”, said development director Deborah Fols. “Because of the generosity of so many donors, those in need who come to the church searching for Christ’s love and protection will receive assistance.” Read more »

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Bishop Malooly sees hope in Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision

By

Dialog Editor

Bishop Malooly sees a “glimmer of hope” for the protection of religious liberty at the close of the Fortnight for Freedom.

In his prepared homily for his July 4 Mass at the Cathedral of St. Peter in Wilmington, the bishop called the U.S. Supreme Court’s June 30 decision allowing for-profit businesses to be exempt from the contraception mandate in the Affordable Care Act for religious reasons, “a great day for the religious freedom of family businesses.”

The court’s decision found that closely held for-profit corporations, such as family businesses, can hold religious beliefs that exempt them from government requirements such as the contraceptive mandate for employee health insurance coverage.

Bishop Malooly cited the remarks of Archbishop Joseph Kurtz of Louisville, who is president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, who praised the court’s decision regarding the HHS contraceptive mandate that allows the owners of Hobby Lobby Stores and Conestoga Wood Specialties corporations “to continue to abide by their faith in how they seek their livelihood, without facing devastating fines.”

Bishop Malooly said that on the Independence Day close of the Fortnight for Freedom, the two weeks designated each year by the U.S. bishops for prayer, education and advocacy for religious liberty, “let us be reminded that it is our dependence on God that enables true freedom, true independence.

“Let us bring our anxieties to the Lord in prayer and let us experience the peace of God that surpasses all understanding as we celebrate with thanksgiving all our blessings. Hopefully, as the Declaration of Independence stated, we can continue to celebrate life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

 

 

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Student and school news

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St. Elizabeth students attended liturgical conference

Five students from St. Elizabeth High School attended the “One Bread, One Cup” Liturgical Leadership Conference at St. Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology in Indiana from June 15-21.

The conference, for high school and college students and youth ministers, included sessions on catechesis, liturgical and spiritual formation, and participation in liturgies. The students also were trained in ministries such as lector, Eucharistic minister and cantor.

The students who attended were Rafael Parra, Jake Barks, Megan McLaughlin, Mason Bondrowski and Alexandra Smyz. Father Norman Carroll, pastor of St. Elizabeth, and Melissa Pollio, the parish youth ministry coordinator, also participated.

 

St. Polycarp parishioner receives scholarship

SMYRNA – Kelley Northam, a parishioner at St. Polycarp in Smyrna and a student at St. Thomas More Academy in Magnolia, received two scholarships from the Brother Vincent Council of the Columbiettes at the council’s end-of-year celebration on June 19.

Northam was awarded a $500 scholarship presented by the Brother Vincent Council, along with a $1,000 grant given in memory of Mariann Weber, an active member of the Columbiettes. Northam was recognized because of her service projects and “a willingness to reach out to others in the church, school and community,” according to the Columbiettes.

 

St. Elizabeth students participate in summer service projects

Nine girls from St. Elizabeth High School in Wilmington participated in a Girls Summer Service Trip with the Oblate Sisters of St. Francis de Sales at Mount Aviat Academy in Childs, Md., from June 25-27, while a group of 11 boys worked in the Germantown section of Philadelphia from June 22-26.

The girls took part in a food drive and also helped Oblate Sister Audrey Frances construct boxes for party favors for a dinner for disabled and mentally challenged, which the students also attended.

The students who attended were Aika San Diego, Karli Cathell, Alyssa Boyle, Jordyn Humes, Julia Short, Andrea Worthy, Stephanie Charney, Tiara Tanzilli and Leighton Trimarco.

“Not only did the girls have a chance to work with the Oblate Sisters, but also were able to learn about religious life,” said Melissa Pollio, a teacher at St. Elizabeth High School and the parish director of youth ministry. “They helped to coordinate a picnic with the Shorehaven School, a food drive for the Immaculate Conception Outreach Program and a myriad of other projects.”

The boys worked out of the St. Vincent de Paul Center and served lunch at Saint John’s Hospice, renovated housing, sorted through donations at Whosoever Gospel Mission, visited retired priests at St. Catherine, volunteered at local community centers and completed a number of projects at DePaul Catholic School.

Those who attended were Johnathan Hendricks, Rafael Parra, Gianni Cotti, Eric Bristol, Brian Marchioni, Dante Tiberi, Edmond Roncone, Michael Dunning, Michael Piekarski, Nathan Cooper and Austin Crozier.

 

Students graduate from state police training academy

Several Catholic high school students were among the 33 from across the state who graduated from the state police training academy after a weeklong program that introduced them to police work. The 43rd annual Trooper Youth Week was sponsored by the American Legion.

The students who attend Catholic high schools are Erin Allston of St. Elizabeth; Joseph Demarco, Derrick Kennedy and Garret Moser of Salesianum; and Christopher Matt of St. Mark’s.

Activities included a daily fitness program and classes on crash investigation, evidence detection and fraud investigation.

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Obituary: Franciscan Sister Dorothy Epple, former Padua teacher

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ASTON, Pa. – Sister Dorothy Epple, a Sister of St. Francis of Philadelphia who taught for two years at Padua Academy, died June 24 in Assisi House. She was 86 and had been a professed member of the congregation for 66 years.

Sister Dorothy, formerly known as Sister Anne Jerome, was at Padua from 1983-85. A Baltimore native, she spent 30 years in York, Pa., in the Diocese of Harrisburg, and she also ministered in the archdioceses of Philadelphia and Baltimore, and in the Diocee of Trenton.

Services will be June 30 in Assisi House, 610 Red Hill Road, Aston. A Christian wake service will start at 9:30 a.m., followed by a viewing, with Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. Burial will be in Our Lady of Angels Cemetery. Donations in her name can be made to the Sisters of St. Francis Foundation, 609 S. Convent Road, Aston, PA 19014.

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