Home » Page 75

Pictures at an exhibition: Dominican sisters have booth featuring papal art at World Meeting of Families

By

Dialog Editor

 

The Caterina Benincasa Gallery and Book Shop on the grounds of Holy Spirit Church in New Castle is a bright light in the diocese that’s hidden under a bushel basket of sorts.

The Dominican Sisters’ Benincasa monastery is on the parish grounds and the impressive shop they have stocked with Catholic art and religious goods is meant to be a stopping point or, more precisely, a shopping point for pilgrims who visit the imposing Our Lady Queen of Peace Shrine by the church. Read more »

Comments Off on Pictures at an exhibition: Dominican sisters have booth featuring papal art at World Meeting of Families

Feeling lucky? Diocese plans drawing for papal Mass tickets

By

 

Dialog Editor

 

The Diocese of Wilmington will conduct a random drawing to distribute 24 pairs of tickets to a Mass celebrated by Pope Francis in Washington, D.C., Sept, 23.

Bob Krebs, diocesan chancellor, reported this week that the Archdiocese of Washington is providing the diocese 24 open seating tickets and 24 standing area tickets for the pope’s Mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, which will include the canonization of Blessed Junipero Serra. The liturgy is scheduled for 4:15 p.m. Travel to Washington must be arranged by the ticketholders. Read more »

Comments Off on Feeling lucky? Diocese plans drawing for papal Mass tickets

‘Shaun the Sheep Movie’: Shear delight for most of the family

August 6th, 2015 Posted in Movies Tags: , , ,

By

Catholic News Service

“Ewe” are bound to have fun watching “Shaun the Sheep Movie,” an endearing and pun-filled animated feature about the madcap adventures of a woolly English flock.

Animated characters Shaun, Slip and Bitzer appear in "Shaun the Sheep Movie." The Catholic News Service classification is A-II -- adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG -- parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.(CNS photo/Lionsgate) See MOVIE-REVIEW-SHAUN-SHEEP Aug. 5, 2015.

Animated characters Shaun, Slip and Bitzer appear in “Shaun the Sheep Movie.” The Catholic News Service classification is A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.(CNS photo/Lionsgate) See MOVIE-REVIEW-SHAUN-SHEEP Aug. 5, 2015.

The inventive, stop-action comedy is created by the master clay-crafters at Aardman Animations. They’ve previously given us the “Wallace & Gromit” films as well as “Chicken Run.”

Unusually for a full-length title, “Shaun” is dialogue-free. The cuddly sheep baa and bleat; the mindless humans grunt and growl. But no words are spoken.

Remarkably, none is needed for an entertaining movie that, some questionable jokes aside, makes suitable viewing for most of the family.

The eponymous hero was introduced in the 1995 “Wallace & Gromit” short “A Close Shave” and went on to star in a British TV series of his own that launched in 2007.

Shaun lives with his fellow livestock on Mossy Bottom Farm, where the daily routine is mind-numbingly dull and monotonous. The owner, known simply as “the Farmer,” suffers from severe myopia and extreme cluelessness. Nonetheless, he runs a tight ship, with his trusty sheepdog Bitzer by his side.

Even sheep deserve a day off now and then, though. So Shaun plots with his flockmates to go rogue after coaxing the Farmer back to sleep (by counting sheep, of course) in his camper-van bed. Sedation successful, the domesticated lambs go wild, watching TV, eating junk food and playing games.

The rollicking good times come to an end when Bitzer gets wind of the high jinks and attempts to restore order. But in his haste to wake the Farmer, Bitzer inadvertently sets the camper in motion. The vehicle rolls down a hill and onto the main road, headed inexorably toward the far-off Big City.

Aghast at the sudden absence of their source of food and shelter, the occupants of the barnyard must rally round and mount a rescue operation. Shaun and his buddies don disguises as they catch the next bus bound for the urban jungle.

Once there, the real fun begins as the human and sheep worlds collide in such places as “Le Chou Brule,” a stuffy French restaurant whose name means “The Burnt Cabbage.”

Further complicating matters are the Farmer’s amnesia, the result of a blow to the head, and the wicked ways of an animal warden named Trumper.

Co-writers and co-directors Mark Burton and Richard Starzak prove themselves adept at clever Chaplinesque sight gags and routines in what is essentially a silent movie. Still, a few audible pleasures are in store, including a tuneful baa-bershop quartet.

The film contains some rude bathroom humor and vague innuendo. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II, adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG.

McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.

 

Comments Off on ‘Shaun the Sheep Movie’: Shear delight for most of the family

Milwaukee archdiocese reaches $21 million settlement with abuse survivors

By

MILWAUKEE — The Archdiocese of Milwaukee has reached a $21 million settlement with abuse survivors, according to an Aug. 4 announcement.

The settlement is part of an agreement on a reorganization plan reached by the archdiocese and the Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors, which has sought compensation for victims/survivors of clergy sexual abuse.

Chief Judge Susan V. Kelley of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin now must rule on the organization plan. It will be submitted to her Aug. 24, with a ruling expected in early November.

The agreement comes more than four years and eight months after the archdiocese filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. That action followed failed mediation with 15 abuse victims/survivors in which the archdiocese had offered a settlement of $4.6 million.

According to the agreement, 330 abuse survivors will share $21 million. The amount for each will be determined by a court-appointed claims administrator who will evaluate claims in two of the four classes of abuse survivors listed in the plan, and make recommendations to the committee as to final compensation.

The four classes include 579 claims filed in Chapter 11. The first class includes 223 abuse survivors whose claims were against “an Archdiocese of Milwaukee priest with a previous substantiated allegation of sexual abuse of a minor,” according to information provided by the archdiocese.

The second class is comprised of 107 claims involving abuse by a religious order priest, brother, sister or lay employee who experienced the abuse at an archdiocesan parish, school or institution where the abuser worked.

Jerry Topczewski, chief of staff for Milwaukee Archbishop Jerome E. Listecki, explained why those claims were included, even though they did not involve archdiocesan priests.

“To get a settlement, we compromised. We thought because this abuse occurred at an archdiocesan parish, school or institution where the abuser was working, we felt that was a compromise that was just,” he said.

The 92 claimants in the third class are those whose claims against the archdiocese are not substantiated or could not be substantiated, or where abuse occurred by someone at a non-archdiocesan organization.

“The creditors’ committee, and that’s an important distinction, is setting aside money to say to them, ‘We will give to them a small amount of money, $2,000 each, at our choice, out of the settlement,’” Topczewski said, noting it is a set amount not subject to review by the claims administrator.

The fourth class is comprised of 157 claimants whose claims were either disallowed or dismissed or whose claims are not for sexual abuse or do not identify the abuser. This group also includes claims filed by 84 individuals who had previously received a financial settlement from the archdiocese. None in this class receive payment.

Part of the compensation for victims/survivors will come from insurance settlements totaling $11 million, including $7.4 million from Lloyd’s of London and $2.3 million from OneBeacon Insurance Group.

The archdiocesan Cemetery Perpetual Care Trust “will voluntarily lend us $3 million, the same as they were going to do in the original plan (of reorganization),” Topczewski said.

Funds in the trust are earmarked for cemetery maintenance to provide perpetual care for the archdiocesan cemeteries that cover 1,000 acres of land where more than 500,000 people are interred.

Attorneys for the victims/survivors had argued the funds should be used to compensate victims.

The trust will reimburse the archdiocese $5 million for perpetual care that covers the last five years. The trust will contribute another $8 million “to settle all pending litigation to bring closure to the cemetery trust issue,” according to information provided by the archdiocese.

The market value of the cemetery trust has been listed as high as $65 million, providing it with the resources to continue providing the perpetual care for which people paid.

One of the concerns regularly mentioned by the court, attorneys and public throughout the proceedings was the cost of the Chapter 11 process. More than $12 million has been paid to attorneys and other professionals, while another $6.5 million has been accrued but not paid. As part of the agreement, additional legal fees have been capped at $1.25 million.

Topczewski said, “Abuse survivors will receive more money than will be paid out in professional fees, which was important to abuse survivors and it was important to us, too.”

From the outset, Archbishop Listecki insisted any plan of reorganization had to include a therapy fund. That $500,000 fund, made possible by contributions from parishes, will provide abuse survivors with access to therapy and counseling for as long as they need it.

Other key provisions of the agreement include:

  • All Archdiocese of Milwaukee parishes, schools and institutions will receive a legal and binding release protecting them from future lawsuits relating to abuse claims that were filed or could have been filed in the Chapter 11 proceeding.
  • Archdiocesan offices will remain at the Cousins Center in the city of St. Francis. According to Topczewski, “It is not on market. Part of the plan was to stay here. Economically, there is no reason for us to move.”
  • Once the plan is approved, the cemetery trust will voluntarily withdraw its request asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review the March 9 decision by the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that said there was no First Amendment protection in Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings for the cemetery trust. Attorneys for the archdiocese had argued that to use cemetery monies to compensate abuse victims would violate Archbishop Listecki’s religious freedom rights as the trustee for the cemetery fund.

“We have a new day,” Topczewski said.

By Brian Olszewski

Comments Off on Milwaukee archdiocese reaches $21 million settlement with abuse survivors

New Mexico bishops urges vigilance after explosions at churches

By

LAS CRUCES, N.M. — Bishop Oscar Cantu of Las Cruces has asked pastors, deacons and parish leaders in the diocese “to exercise increased vigilance in our parish surroundings and activities.”

The bishop’s message, posted early Aug. 4 on the diocese’s Facebook page, was prompted by a small explosion that occurred Aug. 2 outside Holy Cross Catholic Church during the 8 a.m. Mass.

Earlier that morning, by about 20 minutes, a small explosion took place a few miles away at Calvary Baptist Church.

Minor damage was reported at both churches, but there were no injuries or deaths.

Federal and state authorities were investigating what explosives were used and trying to identify who was responsible for the blasts and whether they were connected.

At Holy Cross, the explosion occurred during the eucharistic prayer, according to Bishop Cantu.

Msgr. John Anderson, the pastor, told the Las Cruces Sun-News newspaper: “I was right in the middle of saying the words ‘take and eat, this is my body,’ and there was a pow! I mean, I knew it had to be more than a gunshot.’”

The priest said he “just kept on saying the words.”

Several minutes later, police arrived on the scene and ordered the church evacuated, according to Bishop Cantu.

Msgr. Anderson went to the other side of the street with his parishioners, he said, and “there offered prayers for peace and safety.”

Bishop Cantu said that over the next 24 hours, law enforcement authorities searched the premises for other explosive devices and to gather evidence.

“I was impressed with their thoroughness and professionalism,” the bishop said. “It will surely take some time for the authorities eventually to find the perpetrator(s) and discover the motives of these criminal and violent acts.”

Bishop Cantu said the diocese extended “prayers for and solidarity with” the Baptist congregation.

The AP reported that the explosive device at Calvary Baptist Church had been placed in a mailbox near the entrance to the church’s offices. Police said several congregants were inside the church at the time, but services had not yet started.

“They will remain in our prayers,” he said, adding that Msgr. Anderson and his parishioners also remained “in our thoughts and prayers, as they recover from the trauma of having their most sacred moments violently disrupted. … We pray that, though with increased vigilance, the parish community will return to its routines of worship, formation, service, and community building.”

Bishop Cantu urged parish communities to be aware of “any suspicious activity and report it to proper authorities. Let us do this with heightened awareness, but without alarm.”

He added: “It is important that as much as possible we all return to our routines of parish, school, and community activities, yet with prudent caution and awareness.

The bishop said that he and pastors held an Aug. 3 meeting and realized there is a need for emergency preparedness training in the parishes.

“We will certainly do so in order that our parish and Catholic school leaders can be prepared to respond to any emergencies that may arise,” he said.

“Let us pray for each other. Let us pray for peace,” he said in closing. “Let us pray for the perpetrator(s), that they might discover the joy of peace and forgiveness and leave behind the frustration of hatred and violence.

“We pray for our first responders and those who work to maintain the peace. We pray for strength and healing.”

Comments Off on New Mexico bishops urges vigilance after explosions at churches

Couples divorced and remarried without annulment can share in the life of the church, pope says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Catholics who have divorced and are civilly remarried “are not, in fact, excommunicated; they are not excommunicated and they absolutely must not be treated as if they were,” Pope Francis said.

Resuming his Wednesday general audiences Aug. 5 after a month’s break, Pope Francis returned to the series of talks he has been giving on the family. It was the 100th general audience of his papacy.

Young people react as Pope Francis arrives to lead his weekly audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Aug. 5. (CNS photo/Giampiero Sposito, Reuters) See POPE-AUDIENCE Aug. 5, 2015.

Young people react as Pope Francis arrives to lead his weekly audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Aug. 5. (CNS photo/Giampiero Sposito, Reuters) See POPE-AUDIENCE Aug. 5, 2015.

At his last audience, June 24, he talked about the damage caused especially to children when couples fight and hurt each other.

“Today,” he said, “I want to draw our attention to another reality: how to care for those who, after the irreversible failure of the matrimonial bond, have undertaken a new union.”

Without an annulment of the sacramental marriage, “such a situation contradicts the Christian sacrament,” which is meant to be an indissoluble bond, the pope said.

According to church teaching, in most cases such couples are not permitted to receive Communion. But bishops at the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family last October and preparing for the general synod Oct. 4-25 have been studying and debating possibilities for allowing some couples in some situations to return to the sacraments.

The church, Pope Francis said at the audience, must have “the heart of a mother, a heart that, animated by the Holy Spirit, always seeks the good and the salvation of persons.”

The children of such couples suffer most and deserve particular care, the pope said.

“How can we tell these parents to do everything possible to raise their children in the Christian life, giving them the example of a convinced and lived faith, if we keep them at a distance from the life of the community as if they were excommunicated?” the pope asked.

Particularly over the past few decades, he said, “the church has not been insensitive or lazy” when it comes to providing pastoral care to the divorced and civilly remarried.

In his apostolic exhortation, “Familiaris Consortio,” St. John Paul II saw an “obligation, ‘for love of the truth,’ to exercise a ‘careful discernment of situations,’” noting for example “the difference between one who has endured a separation and one who provoked it,” Pope Francis said.

Retired Pope Benedict XVI also studied the question, he said, “calling for an attentive discernment and wise pastoral accompaniment, knowing that no simple recipes exist.”

As the studies and discernment continue, Pope Francis said, it is essential that Catholic pastors “openly and coherently demonstrate the willingness of the community to welcome and encourage” divorced and remarried couples and their families to participate in church life.

Prayer, listening to the word of God, attending Mass, educating their children in the faith, serving the poor and working for justice and peace should be part of their lives, he said.

Quoting his apostolic exhortation, “The Joy of the Gospel,” Pope Francis told those gathered for the audience, “The church is called to be the house of the Father, with doors always wide open … Everyone can share in some way in the life of the church; everyone can be part of the community.”

Comments Off on Couples divorced and remarried without annulment can share in the life of the church, pope says

Cardinal O’Malley urges Senate to defund Planned Parenthood

By

WASHINGTON — The head of the U.S. bishops’ pro-life committee Aug. 3 urged U.S. senators to take the federal money that goes to the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and instead fund women’s health care providers that do not promote abortion.

“It has long been troubling to many Americans that the nation’s largest abortion network, performing over a third of all abortions, receives over half a billion taxpayer dollars a year,” said Boston Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley.

Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley (CNS file?Reuters) (

Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley (CNS file?Reuters) (

“This concern has rightly grown in recent years,” he wrote in a letter to the senators.

“The most recent revelations about Planned Parenthood’s willingness to traffic in fetal tissue from abortions, and to alter abortion methods not for any reason related to women’s health but to obtain more intact organs, is the latest demonstration of a callousness toward women and their unborn children that is shocking to many Americans,” he said.

The cardinal is chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Pro-Life Activities.

He urged senators to support S. 1881, a measure that would defund Planned Parenthood and its affiliates. His letter followed the release in mid-July of videos of the organization’s officials filmed undercover by a nonprofit California-based organization called the Center for Medical Progress.

In two videos, top Planned Parenthood physicians describe how abortions are carried out to best salvage fetal tissue and organs for researchers and described a range of prices paid for different body parts.

A third video was of an interview with a technician talking about harvesting fetal body parts and included graphic footage. A fourth video was about to be released until Los Angeles Superior Court July 28 issued an order blocking its release.

Planned Parenthood receives more than $500 million of its $1.3 billion annual budget from federal and state programs. According to 2013 data, the latest available, Planned Parenthood says abortions represent 3 percent of the total services its facilities provide.

On Capitol Hill, a number of Republicans in the House and Senate have called for an end to federal funding of Planned Parenthood. Several states also have launched investigations into the organization.

Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, in a statement said that “allegations that Planned Parenthood profits in any way from tissue donation is not true.” She later apologized for “the tone” the physicians used in describing abortion procedures and also argued the videos had been heavily edited to distort the truth.

In his letter, Cardinal O’Malley added: “The Catholic Church comes to this issue from a perspective rooted in experience. Catholic charitable agencies and pregnancy help centers have helped countless pregnant women find life-affirming alternatives to abortion.”

It was reported that Senate Democrats voted to block S. 1881 on Aug. 3 but that Republicans plan introduce a motion to reconsider it in September.

 

 

Comments Off on Cardinal O’Malley urges Senate to defund Planned Parenthood

Tom Cruise grabs a ride on jet during impossible mission

August 4th, 2015 Posted in Movies Tags: , , , ,

By

Catholic News Service

Light the fuse and cue that nerve-jangling theme music everyone loves to hum; it’s time for “Mission: Impossible — Rogue Nation.”

As helmed by writer-director Christopher McQuarrie, this fifth installment in a franchise that dates back, on the big screen, to 1996, and that began life as a CBS-TV series a full three decades before that — delivers a steady but stylized parade of action. The result is a nifty espionage adventure that most parents will likely find acceptable for their older teens.

Tom Cruise stars in a scene from the movie "Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation." The Catholic News Service classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. (CNS photo/Paramount) See MOVIE-REVIEW-MISSION-IMPOSSIBLE July 31, 2015.

Tom Cruise stars in a scene from the movie “Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation.” The Catholic News Service classification is A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. (CNS photo/Paramount) See MOVIE-REVIEW-MISSION-IMPOSSIBLE July 31, 2015.

Viewers of any age looking for something more substantive than a fun, globe-trotting ride, with occasional reflections on the conflict between personal and patriotic allegiances thrown in along the way, will, however, scratch this picture’s slick surface in vain.

But, then, profundity has never been this property’s foremost agenda item anyway, whatever the medium. The point here is to waste as little time as possible before positioning agent Ethan Hunt — Tom Cruise, of course — on the outside of an airplane that’s roaring off the runway in some ex-Soviet republic, and making the fate of humanity depend on his sheer, headwinds-be-darned stick-to-itiveness.

Do-dah-do, do-dah-do …

This time out, Ethan and his colleagues on the Impossible Mission Force — an IMF even Greek moviegoers can love — are battling an underground terrorist organization of global reach called The Syndicate. (You can tell they must be dangerous by that capital T.)

Unfortunately for the good guys, Alan Hunley (Alec Baldwin), the stubbornly jealous director of the CIA, stoutly denies that The Syndicate exists. Worse yet, over the fruitless objections of the IMF’s representative, William Brandt (Jeremy Renner), Hunley convinces the Senate committee charged with such matters to shut his rivals’ super-secret agency down altogether.

Naturally, Ethan and his intrepid circle — besides Brandt, there’s desk jockey-turned-field operative Benji Dunn (Simon Pegg) and topflight computer whizz Luther Stickell (Ving Rhames) — are not to be stymied by the machinations of mere Capitol Hill pen-pushers.

Still, they don’t have much to work with: Hunt has gotten a glimpse of The Syndicate’s villainous top dog, pasty faced Solomon Lane (Sean Harris). And he’s been helped out of a fix by mystery woman Ilsa Faust (Rebecca Ferguson). Though Ilsa turns out to be a British agent who has managed to infiltrate The Syndicate, her true loyalties remain uncertain.

The interaction between Ethan and Ilsa is not exactly all business. But those with enough brand memory to recall that Ethan is a married man will not be surprised to observe that romance, in this iteration of his eventful biography, is kept at the level of significant glances and tellingly raised eyebrows.

Along with not overheating things for the younger set, this brake on the central duo’s flirtation also allows Ilsa — whose skills in one dust-up after another impress even Ethan himself — to stand on her own two, jujitsu-wielding feet.

The dialogue occasionally ponders the morality of all the violence Ethan and his buddies deal out in defense of the American Way. Are such means justified in pursuit of justice writ large? How can operatives resist the urge to revel in mayhem for its own sake? The answer to these important ethical questions is: Do-dah-do, do-dah-do…

The film contains pervasive but virtually bloodless violence, brief glimpses of partial nudity and a couple of uses each of profanity and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III, adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13..

– – –

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

Comments Off on Tom Cruise grabs a ride on jet during impossible mission

Bishop Malooly asks for prayers for the success of pope’s visit to the United States

By

Bishop Malooly is asking parishes in the Diocese of Wilmington to host Holy Hours for the success of Pope Francis’ visit to the United States next month. Read more »

Comments Off on Bishop Malooly asks for prayers for the success of pope’s visit to the United States

Don’t be afraid or ashamed to go to confession, pope says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Trusting in God’s infinite mercy, people should not be afraid or embarrassed to go to confession, Pope Francis said.

“There are people who are afraid to go to confession, forgetting that they will not encounter a severe judge there, but the immensely merciful Father,” Pope Francis told thousands of people gathered in St. Peter’s Square Aug. 2 for the midday recitation of the Angelus prayer.

Pope Francis hears confession during a penitential liturgy in early March in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican. During his Aug. 2 Angelus, Pope Francis told people not to be afraid or ashamed to go to confession. (CNS photo/Alessandro Bianchi

Pope Francis hears confession during a penitential liturgy in early March in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican. During his Aug. 2 Angelus, Pope Francis told people not to be afraid or ashamed to go to confession. (CNS photo/Alessandro Bianchi

The pope also told the people gathered under a scalding sun that “when we go to confession, we feel a bit ashamed. That happens to all of us, but we must remember that this shame is a grace that prepares us for the embrace of the Father, who always forgives and always forgives everything.”

In his main address the pope commented on the day’s Gospel reading from the Gospel of St. John, which recounts how the crowds followed Jesus after the miracle of the multiplication of the loaves and fishes.

“Those people followed him for the material bread that had placated their hunger the day before,” Pope Francis said. “They didn’t understand that that bread, broken for many, was the expression of the love of Jesus.”

“They gave more value to the bread than to the giver,” the pope said.

Feeding the crowd, he said, Jesus wanted to lead people to the Father and to a life that was about more than just “the daily worries of eating, dressing, success or a career.”

Every person has within him or her a hunger for life, for meaning and for eternity, Pope Francis said. Jesus satisfies that hunger with the gift of himself on the cross and in the Eucharist.

“Jesus does not eliminate preoccupations and the search for daily bread,” the pope said. However, “Jesus reminds us that the real meaning of our earthly existence is the end, eternity, the encounter with him, who is gift and giver.”

In giving himself, Pope Francis said, Jesus also gives people a task: “that we, in turn, satisfy the spiritual and material hunger of our brothers and sisters by proclaiming the Gospel everywhere.”

Comments Off on Don’t be afraid or ashamed to go to confession, pope says
Marquee Powered By Know How Media.