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Column: How did global warming cause a cool summer?

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“Can we remain indifferent before the problems associated with such realities as climate change … loss of productivity in vast agricultural areas, the pollution of rivers and aquifers, the loss of biodiversity, the increase of natural catastrophes and the deforestation of equatorial and tropical regions?”

These aren’t the radical words from the leader of a secular environmental organization, no; these are the radical words from the former leader of the Catholic Church.

In his 2010 World Day of Peace message titled, “If You Want to Cultivate Peace, Protect Creation,” Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI wrote that “it would be irresponsible not to take seriously” the signs of a growing environmental crisis.

The greatest threat to the natural world is climate change, caused principally by human induced global warming. Burning fossil fuels – oil, gas and coal for energy – produces huge amounts of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in the lower atmosphere.

The earth indeed is getting hotter. It’s not a hoax.

According to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), last decade was the hottest on record.

And according to NASA, “97 percent of climate scientists agree that global warming trends over the past century are “very likely due to human activities.”

In a study titled “Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis” the highly authoritative United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports that it is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed global warming since the mid-20th century.

According to new findings by the World Meteorological Organization, concentrations of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide – the major cause of global warming – increased at their fastest rate in 2013 than in any year since 1984.

And in a study by the non-governmental organization Germanwatch, the U.S. is the second largest emitter of carbon dioxide.

To underscore the critical importance for world leaders to robustly respond to the climate changing dangers already beginning to affect the earth and humanity, the U.N. on Sept. 23 will host “Climate Summit 2014.”

With all of the solid scientific evidence validating climate change and global warming, I was wondering why this summer has felt cooler than normal where I live in Maryland.

Dr. Brenda Ekwurzel, senior climate scientist for the Union of Concerned Scientists, explained to me that the continued relatively faster warming of the Arctic region is causing shifts in the jet stream pattern which, in turn, is leading to more unusual weather in the Northern Hemisphere.

She said that during the first half of this year the same jet stream that has been bringing mostly cooler weather to the eastern U.S. has caused hot drought conditions along the west coast.

As the Arctic and Greenland ice caps continue to melt, ocean levels will dangerously rise – putting large areas of world-wide coastal land under water.

While too much water will plague many, countless others will suffer from not having enough.

According to the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, “Hundreds of millions of people face water shortages that will worsen as temperatures rise.”

We need to quickly move toward, and heavily invest in, clean, safe and renewable alternative sources of energy – like wind, solar and geo-thermal.

Pope Benedict writes, “In a word, concern for the environment calls for a broad global vision of the world; a responsible common effort to move beyond approaches based on selfish interests towards a vision constantly open to the needs of all peoples.”

Our wise retired Holy Father is absolutely right.

Tony Magliano is a syndicated social justice and peace columnist, who lives in the Diocese of Wilmington.

 

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Vatican official says ISIS conflict is not about religion, points to economic interests

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Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON — The conflict in which Islamic State fighters are driving out Christians and other minorities must not be seen as a war between Islam and Christianity, said the head of the Vatican Congregation for Eastern Churches.

“I do not share this position and I ask, on the contrary, that it never prevail,” Cardinal Leonardo Sandri told participants in the inaugural In Defense of Christians summit Sept. 9.

Cardinal Leonardo Sandri, prefect of the Congregation for Eastern Churches, leads a prayer during an ecumenical service at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington Sept. 9. Christian patriarchs from the Middle East, along with lawmakers and international human rights activists, are attending In Defense of Christians’ three-day summit about the persecution of Middle Eastern minorities. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)

Cardinal Leonardo Sandri, prefect of the Congregation for Eastern Churches, leads a prayer during an ecumenical service at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington Sept. 9. Christian patriarchs from the Middle East, along with lawmakers and international human rights activists, are attending In Defense of Christians’ three-day summit about the persecution of Middle Eastern minorities. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)

He said the Islamists are not looking to destroy a foreign Christian culture, but are intent on destroying centuries of “a respectful and useful cultural coexistence.”

He also said it was “impossible … to quell the doubts about how the vast economic interests at stake affect the conflict.”

The cardinal reminded approximately 500 people at the Omni Shoreham Hotel about Pope Francis’ statement Sept. 8, 2013, the day after his prayer vigil for peace in Syria. Pope Francis said: “And the doubt always remains: Is this war or that war, because wars are everywhere, really a war to solve problems, or is it a commercial war for selling weapons in illegal trade? These are the enemies to fight, united and consistent, following no other interests than those of peace and of the common good.”

Cardinal Sandri said that people also must consider “the control of oil wells and of gas deposits, the safety of the petroleum and gas pipelines, the supremacy of one area of free commercial trade over another, and this is not only in the Middle East but also in Eastern Europe and in other regions of the world.”

He said this leads to a situation in which someone’s personal economic interests are more important that human life, which “can even be annihilated, or at least not taken into account.”

Cardinal Sandri said the situation in which Christians and other minorities were being forced from their homes and executed had to be resolved through the United Nations, and it might or might not involve the use of force.

“The unjust assailant must be halted, but let us not limit our thinking to the use of force, in some cases necessary, alone, and in any case only within the framework of an international agreement under the aegis of the United Nations, involving the Arab and Muslim countries,” he said.

The cardinal thanked Muslim leaders, such as the grand muftis of Saudi Arabia and of Al-Azhar University in Egypt, as well as of several imams of England and Italy,who had spoken against Islamic State atrocities in recent weeks.

“Let us thank them in the hope that their example may be followed by many so that no silence may be equivocal, and let us thank together all those in Iraq, in Jordan, in Lebanon, in Bahrain … who have worked hard or have offered help and shown willingness to welcome the Christians expelled from the plain of Ninevah,” he said.

He said he had heard of private residents of Jordan who had gone to the Caritas offices with basic goods or offered to pay rent for refugee families. He said Muslim students had volunteered with Caritas in Jordan.

Earlier in the day, speaking to the Administrative Committee of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, Cardinal Sandri thanked them for their consistent calls for Americans to remember their “elder brethren in the faith.” He also thanked them for their special prayers for peace in Iraq; letters to politicians, including President Barack Obama, meant to raise awareness; and special collections for those affected by Middle Eastern violence.

 

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NFL ref is a rookie on the field but not in his faith

September 11th, 2014 Posted in Uncategorized Tags: , , ,

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Catholic News Service

INDIANAPOLIS — The emotion poured out of Bryan Neale when he learned that the dream he had pursued for 25 years had finally come true.

The National Football League informed Neale earlier this year that he had been chosen as one of the 13 new referees hired for the 2014 season.

Bryan Neale, center, talks with a fellow NFL official during a pre-season game in early August between the San Diego Chargers and the Dallas Cowboys. Neale, a member of Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in Indianapolis, has always relied on his faith on and off the field. (CNS photo/courtesy Bryan Neale)

Bryan Neale, center, talks with a fellow NFL official during a pre-season game in early August between the San Diego Chargers and the Dallas Cowboys. Neale, a member of Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in Indianapolis, has always relied on his faith on and off the field. (CNS photo/courtesy Bryan Neale)

“The phone rang at 11:48 a.m. on March 21, if that tells you anything,” said Neale, a member of Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in Indianapolis. “I’d be lying if I said I didn’t start bawling like a baby. It was a really big deal. It’s one of those deals where you go, ‘Oh my God, I’m in the NFL!’”

Yet, even Neale’s joy for his selection does not match the emotion he feels when he tells the story of how his Catholic faith became the focal point of his life.

“I grew up in a conflicted household,” he told The Criterion, newspaper of the Indianapolis archdiocese. “Both of my parents are from Catholic families in Evansville. My dad was a hippie, and he would rebel against the Catholic Church because, in his mind, it was old school and brainwashing. So growing up, I had my dad’s influence which was to be a free spirit. And I had my extended family which went to Mass every Sunday.”

He was baptized but never had his first Communion or confirmation, he said. During Mass, his aunts, uncles and cousins would go to Communion, while “me and my Methodist aunt would be sitting in the pew together,” he recalled. “I always felt left out. Not to be a sob story, but I felt I always wanted to be a part of it.”

Neale reached a turning point as a young adult.

“As I moved into my twenties, I hit what a lot of people do, the searching phase. I was faithful, but I really didn’t have a place to worship. The Catholic Church was always my home. I always felt fully at peace and comfortable there,” he said.

But after “talking to a friend about being lost and meandering around,” the friend told Neale he was taking Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults classes at Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish. He put Neale in touch with the director.

“I went through RCIA in 1997,” said Neale, now 44 and the father of four. “Even to this day, the consecration and Communion never get old to me. It’s the most special thing going because it’s the thing I always missed out on when I was a kid. To me, it’s the most touching, important thing that we do in the Catholic faith.”

Neale’s “all-in” approach to his faith reflects the same commitment he had to pursue his dream of becoming an NFL official.

He played football through high school, but when he enrolled at Indiana University in Bloomington he knew he was not “fast enough or good enough” to play the sport in college. So he set his sights on becoming an official. He got his license in 1988.

“My first game was a (junior varsity) game at Bloomington South (High School). I ran around the field, I had no idea of what I was doing, I never blew my whistle, I didn’t throw any flags, and I thought it was awesome. It was the greatest thing ever.”

A year later, he wrote down a list of goals, including becoming an NFL official someday. As he progressed through the college ranks, including eight years in the Big Ten Conference, his focus never wavered.

Then came the moment when he was sure he had blown any chance of living his dream, during the national college championship game in January 2011, Oregon vs. Auburn.

“Oregon was driving to win the game at the end of the fourth quarter. … I ran into a defensive back who was guarding a receiver on a fourth-down play. I hit this Auburn kid, and it left the Oregon kid wide open. He caught a pass for 16 yards, and they went down and scored a touchdown.”

Neale’s voice softened.

“For a moment, I thought my career was over. But you still have the rest of the game. There were a couple minutes left. Auburn ended up coming back and kicking a field goal to win,” he said.

Faith helps in those moments, too.

“I pray a lot more on the football field than I do in church,” Neale said, adding, “I pray all the time. It may not be in the traditional on-the-knees, eyes-closed, hands-folded manner, but I’m constantly talking. More than anything, I affirm that God is going to take care of me.”

Neale’s faith guides him in family life as well. He’s been married to his wife, Jennifer, for 14 years. Their four children range in age from 7 to 12.

It’s important to him to give his children “a more structured faith environment,” than he had, “so it’s very central to what we do,” he said.

“It makes me feel good to start them off that way, to expose them to faith, to let them experience the things that I didn’t experience that I wish I would have as a kid,” Neale said. “And still to give them, hopefully, the freedom when they’re adults to make their own reasonable choices about their faith.

“I still want them to have part of what my dad taught me, to be open-minded and be called to what you’re called to. I hope to God, they all stay close.”

 — By John Shaughnessy

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Raiders begin 2014 volleyball campaign with sweep of Vikings

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Ursuline's Miranda Schiccatano returns the ball as St. Elizabeth's Erin Evans (6) and Karli Cathell try to block during the Raiders’ 25-14, 25-12, 25-19 win Monday night at the St. E Center. The Dialog/DonBlakePhotography.com

Ursuline’s Miranda Schiccatano returns the ball as St. Elizabeth’s Erin Evans (6) and Karli Cathell try to block during the Raiders’ 25-14, 25-12, 25-19 win Monday night at the St. E Center. (The Dialog/DonBlakePhotography.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ursuline's Kailyn Kampert, who finished with 12 kills, returns the ball as St. Elizabeth's Kylie DeGhetto trirs to block.

Ursuline’s Kailyn Kampert, who finished with 12 kills, returns the ball as St. Elizabeth’s Kylie DeGhetto trirs to block.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pope cites lessons from Mary: Be joyful, help others, never give up

September 8th, 2014 Posted in International News, Uncategorized, Vatican News

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — When a mother has a birthday, children send their greetings and love, so make sure to do the same thing on the feast of the Nativity of Mary, Pope Francis said.

The liturgical feast day Sept. 8 “would be her birthday. And what do you do when your mom has a birthday? You send her greetings and best wishes,” the pope said, after praying the Angelus with people gathered in St. Peter’s Square Sept. 7.

Pope Francis waves as he leads his Angelus from the window of his office in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Sept. 7.  (CNS photo/Alessandro Bianchi, Reuters)

Pope Francis waves as he leads his Angelus from the window of his office in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican Sept. 7. (CNS photo/Alessandro Bianchi, Reuters)

The pope asked people to say “a Hail Mary from the heart” and to not forget to tell her “Happy Birthday.”

Mary has three very important lessons for today’s Christians, the pope said in a written message to Cuban bishops marking Sept. 8 as the feast of Our Lady of Charity of El Cobre, patroness of Cuba.

He said Mary teaches people to experience the joy of Christ and share it with others; to never let adversity beat you down; and always help those in need with love and mercy, he said.

The pope said people should imitate how Mary responded to God’s call with her same joy, haste and perseverance, the pope said.

“Every time I read sacred Scripture, in the verses that talk about Our Lady, three verbs catch my attention,” the pope said.

The three kinds of action — be joyful, help without hesitation and persevere, should be “put into practice” by all Catholics, he added.

Whoever discovers Jesus will be “filled with an inner joy so great that nothing and no one can take it away,” he said.

With Christ in their lives, people find the strength and hope “not to be sad and discouraged, thinking problems have no solution.”

For the second action, people should always rise “in haste,” just like Mary, to help others in need, he said.

“Victory is to those who repeatedly rise up, without getting discouraged. If we imitate Mary, we cannot sit with our arms crossed, just complaining or perhaps avoiding any effort so that others do what is our responsibility,” he said.

Making a difference and helping others does not have to be done on a grand scale, he said, but entails doing everyday things “with tenderness and mercy.”

“The third verb is to persevere,” the pope said.

Mary relied on God and his goodness for the strength and courage needed to stay by Christ’s side no matter what and to encourage his disciples to do the same.

“In this world in which long-lasting values are rejected and everything is changing, in which the disposable triumphs, in which it seems people are afraid of life’s commitments, the Virgin encourages us to be men and women who are constant in their good works, who keep their word, who are always faithful,” the pope said.

Cuban bishops visited the Vatican in late August for the installation of their gift, a replica of the statue of Our Lady of Charity of El Cobre, which was placed in the Vatican Gardens.

 

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Art classes are one way Good Shepherd, Perryville, is growing

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For The Dialog

 

PERRYVILLE, Md. – The third-grade class crowded around Mark Hendron as he studied a sneaker on the table, drawing an outline of the shoe.

“Mr. Hendron, you’re a good artist,” one of the students told Hendron, now in his sixth year as art instructor at Good Shepherd School. Read more »

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Friday homily: Pope Francis says don’t be afraid of change, ‘take up new wineskins’

September 5th, 2014 Posted in Uncategorized

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Do not be afraid to change and let go of obsolete structures, Pope Francis said, because Jesus has brought new wine that needs fresh wineskins.

“The Gospel is newness. The Gospel is celebration. And one can live the Gospel fully only with a joyous and renewed heart,” he said in a homily Sept. 5. Among those invited to the morning Mass were parishioners of the Paulist-run American parish in Rome, the Church of Santa Susanna.

Pope Francis (CNS/Paul Haring)

Pope Francis (CNS/Paul Haring)

The pope’s homily centered on the day’s Gospel reading in which the scribes and Pharisees questioned Jesus about his disciples not following laws concerning fasting.

Jesus answered, “Can you make the wedding guests fast while the bridegroom is with them?” He continued with a parable underlining the need to use new vessels or wineskins to hold new wine, a new message of renewed life.

Pope Francis said Jesus brought a new freedom in which the Christian is not “the slave to many tiny laws,” but follows with an open heart a new commandment of love and the rules of the beatitudes.

The Pharisees and scribes created “small laws” that they were custodians of but also prisoners, he said during an early morning Mass in the chapel of his residence, the Domus Sanctae Marthae.

“This law by these people wasn’t bad,” he said; the people were just imprisoned, “in wait for the faith to come,” the faith, the “definitive freedom” that was revealed in Jesus Christ.

“The newness of the Gospel is that; it is to redeem (us) from the law,” he said, according to Vatican Radio.

“Now one of you could tell me: ‘But father, don’t Christians have laws?’ Yes. Jesus said: ‘I have come not to abolish the law, but to fulfill it’” through “the beatitudes, the law of love, total love, like he, Jesus, loved us.”

This “is the newness of the Gospel, it is celebration, joy and freedom,” he said.

Jesus’ parable of new wineskins for new wine means “to not be afraid of changing things according to the law of the Gospel.”

“That’s why the church asks us, all of us, for some changes. It asks us to leave behind temporary structures: They’re not needed. Take up fresh wineskins, those of the Gospel.”

Christians today observe “the law that Jesus brought to its fulfillment, in the commandment of love” and following the beatitudes.

 

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Baton Rouge diocese asks Supreme Court to reverse seal of confession case

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BATON ROUGE, La. — The Diocese of Baton Rouge has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a Louisiana Supreme Court decision that a priest may be compelled to testify as to what he heard in the confessional in 2008 concerning an abuse case.

The legal step is the latest in a case involving Father Jeffrey Bayhi, pastor of St. John the Baptist Church in Zachary, Louisiana, and the sanctity of the seal of confession.

The Diocese of Baton Rouge, La., is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a lower court's decision on the seal of confession. (CNS file)

The Diocese of Baton Rouge, La., is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a lower court’s decision on the seal of confession. (CNS file)

The petition to the U.S. Supreme Court comes after a Louisiana Supreme Court ruling in May outlining arguments that priests are subject to mandatory reporting laws regarding abuse of minors if the person who made the confession waives confidentiality. The state Supreme Court opened the door for a hearing in which the priest would testify about what he heard in the confessional.

Under canon law, the seal of confession is sacred under the penalty of excommunication.

In the case, a girl who was 14 in 2008 said she told her parish priest, Father Bayhi, in the confessional that she was abused by a now-dead lay member of the parish.

The girl’s parents sued Father Bayhi and the Diocese of Baton Rouge for failing to report the abuse. The parents won at the district court level about compelling the priest to testify, but they lost in Louisiana’s First Circuit Court of Appeals, before the state’s highest court reversed and vacated the appellate court’s decision.

NOLA.com reported that the young woman was identified as Rebecca Mayeux, now 20, in an interview with WBRZ, a Baton Rouge television station. She told the station that Father Bayhi told her to “take care of it” after she told him of the abuse when participating in the sacrament of reconciliation.

In a documents filed with the U.S. Supreme Court Aug. 21, the diocese said the state Supreme Court ruling threatens “church autonomy.”

The diocese cited case law from a court decision involving the Serbian Eastern Orthodox Diocese that found that “religious controversies are not the proper subject of civil court inquiry.”

The hearing proposed by Louisiana Supreme Court would violate the church’s constitutional protection afforded by the First and Fourteenth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution to abide by its own laws, the diocese claimed.

In a statement released Sept. 4, the diocese said the state Supreme Court’s decision “strikes a very hard blow against religious freedom, and one which the diocese and Father Bayhi feel compelled to vigorously contest.”

“The ruling, left undisturbed, would result in a trial during which the plaintiffs would be permitted to offer evidence regarding what transpired during a series of alleged confessions with Father Bayhi and the diocese utterly unable to defend themselves, unless Father Bayhi were to violate his vows to his church by divulging whether or not Ms. (Rebecca) Mayeux obtained confession, and, if such confessions did take place, what was said.

“The Louisiana Supreme Court has directed the trial court to hold an evidentiary hearing and then to take the unprecedented step of deciding whether or not a sacrament actually took place. Such a trial is completely at odds with the guarantees of religious freedom enshrined in our federal and state constitutions, and the diocese and Father Bayhi will take every legal step available to ensure that those proceedings never occur,” the statement said.

 

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Sistine Chapel faces fallout from ‘Francis effect’ with increased attendance

September 5th, 2014 Posted in Uncategorized Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — The “Francis effect” has spilled over into the Sistine Chapel, bringing a surge in visitors but also increasing risks to maintenance of what Antonio Paolucci, director of the Vatican Museums, calls “the world’s chapel.”

Prior to a 14-year restoration, completed in 1994, visitors to the chapel numbered about 1.5 million annually. That rose to more than 5 million in 2011. Since the March 2013 election of Pope Francis, whose weekly public audiences and readings of the Angelus have boosted turnout in St. Peter’s Square, the number of chapel visitors is up to 5.5 million, or 20,000 per day and 30,000 on the last Sunday of every month, when admission is free.

The Sistine Chapel in the Vatican Museums is seen at the Vatican in this July 14, 2010, file photo. The election of Pope Francis has boosted the number of visitors to the Vatican and also the Museums. To protect the Sistine Chapel, new air conditioning and LED lighting systems are being installed. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

The Sistine Chapel in the Vatican Museums is seen at the Vatican in this July 14, 2010, file photo. The election of Pope Francis has boosted the number of visitors to the Vatican and also the Museums. To protect the Sistine Chapel, new air conditioning and LED lighting systems are being installed. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Every 20 minutes, a group of almost 700 people is let into the room, which measures less than 6,000 square feet.

So many visitors not only make the viewing experience less pleasant, they bring in perspiration and bacteria that threaten the survival of masterpieces by Ghirlandaio, Botticelli, Pinturicchio, Perugino and, most famously, Michelangelo.

Recent accounts in the Italian press have complained that the chapel is “as crowded as a train station,” and warned that a “wall” of human breath threatens “unimaginable disaster” for the 12,000 square feet of painted surfaces. As one headline put it, “The enemy is you.” Paolucci himself wrote in the Vatican newspaper that the chapel “risks being a victim of its own success.”

The problems are aggravated by the late-15th-century chapel’s peculiar design, which resembles that of a fortress, possibly reflecting the defensive architecture of Avignon, France, during an earlier period of papal exile there. The chapel has no exterior entrance, and is entered solely through the Apostolic Palace; its high windows are permanently closed and abut an interior balcony called, in medieval style, a “patrol corridor.”

All this keeps the exchange of air to a minimum, accentuating the effects of pollution, including wind-borne car exhaust and dust, and of exterior humidity and abrupt changes in temperature.

One obvious remedy would be to reduce the number of visitors, but Paolucci has vigorously opposed this, insisting the faithful have a right to see the room where cardinals have elected new popes for more than five centuries.

The present air-conditioning system, installed in the mid-1990s, was designed for only half the current number of visitors, so the Vatican is installing a powerful new system slated to be operative in October.

That is not the only new technology being introduced to assist in conservation.

To reduce the risk of heat damage from illumination, the Vatican is installing an advanced LED lighting system that, according to its manufacturer, will also slash energy consumption by 60 to 80 percent. The previous halogen lamps, installed in the 1980s, used 90 percent of the energy for heat and only 10 percent for light.

LED illumination has its critics. Because each LED light must be color-adjusted for the surface upon which it is directed, colors can appear inconsistent.

Total cost for the 7,000 new LED lights and their installation was $2.5 million, almost half of it paid for by the European Union, the rest by private sponsors.

 

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FAQ: How Sustaining Hope campaign helps diocese and parishes

September 4th, 2014 Posted in Uncategorized Tags:

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Special to The Dialog

 

As 33 parishes prepare for Wave II of the Sustaining Hope for the Future campaign, leaders of the $28 million drive stressed anew why the effort is necessary and the reasons why its success is vital not only to the Diocese of Wilmington, but to the parishes themselves.

Sustaining Hope for the Future aims to help the diocese get back on its feet following a 2011 bankruptcy court settlement in which the diocese paid $77.4 million to settle 150 claims of survivors of clergy sexual abuse, secure the lay employees’ pension trust, and honor claims of other creditors. The campaign seeks $10 million for the Lay Employee Pension Fund; $3 million for the Trust for the Welfare and Retirement of Priests; $2 million for diocesan ministries, and $11.2 million for individual parish projects. Wave II parishes begin their campaigns later this month to raise a combined goal of $16,435,000. Read more »

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