Home » Posts tagged 'morally offensive'

‘Atomic Blonde’ — sadistic, degrading and tedious

July 27th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

By

Catholic News Service

Aspiring to be edgy and stylish, the espionage thriller “Atomic Blonde,” matches sometimes sadistic brawling with exploitative scenes of aberrant sex. The result is not only degraded but tedious as well.

Charlize Theron stars in a scene from the movie "Atomic Blonde." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive. (CNS)

Charlize Theron stars in a scene from the movie “Atomic Blonde.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS)

In the weeks leading up to the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, British operative Lorraine Broughton (Charlize Theron) is dispatched to the still-divided city. Her mission is to retrieve a vital dossier containing the identity of every Western agent active in the metropolis.

Broughton gets unreliable help form the jaded station chief, David Percival (James McAvoy). Percival, viewers are led to suspect, may be the mole whose double dealing the elusive file would reveal along with its other secrets.

Broughton receives less expected but more dependable aid from novice French spy Delphine Lasalle (Sofia Boutella). Rather rapidly, the two women wind up in bed together in more ways than one.

Told in flashbacks during a debriefing in which CIA officer Emmett Kurzfeld (John Goodman) joins Broughton’s superiors, Eric Gray (Toby Jones) and Chief “C” (James Faulkner) as she tells her tale, the plot of director David Leitch’s film is as convoluted as its tacky appeal to its audience’s lowest instincts is straightforward.

When she’s not groping Lasalle, Broughton grapples with enemies from the Stasi and the KGB, finding creative ways to eliminate them such as plunging a corkscrew into the esophagus of one opponent. Percival, for his part, prefers a handy ice pick to the forehead. He also does Broughton one better by waking up in one scene with a duo of dames bookending him.

Tough on the men and tender with her lady, Broughton, whose adventures are adapted from the 2012 graphic novel series “The Coldest City,” embodies a pornographic adolescent fantasy anyone committed to a Christian view of human dignity should shun.

The film contains nasty violence with much gore, graphic lesbian sexual activity, implied group sex, upper female and rear nudity, a blasphemous joke, a mild oath as well as pervasive rough and some crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R, restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

Comments Off on ‘Atomic Blonde’ — sadistic, degrading and tedious

‘The House’ is for losers

July 7th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

By

Catholic News Service

Had “The House” been made as a taut, dark comedy about the price of greed, it might have some merit. Instead, director Andrew Jay Cohen, who co-wrote the screenplay with Brendan O’Brien, has produced a sloppy, illogical, cringe-inducing time-waster.

Will Ferrell, Amy Poehler and Jason Mantzoukas star in a scene from the movie "The House." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive. (CNS photo/Warner Bros.)

Will Ferrell, Amy Poehler and Jason Mantzoukas star in a scene from the movie “The House.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS photo/Warner Bros.)

Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler as Scott and Kate Johansen are demonstrably stupid about the basics of financial security. But they are aware they’re in over their heads with debt. “We played by the rules and this is where it got us,” Scott complains bitterly.

Everyone’s happy when daughter Alex (Ryan Simpkins) is accepted at Bucknell University. But they were counting on a free-ride scholarship offered by their town, and the town council decides to build an elaborate community pool instead.

The couple’s solution is to go into partnership with their friend Frank (Jason Mantzoukas) to open a gambling den in his home. Frank’s trying to avoid foreclosure and get back with his wife, Raina (Michaela Watkins), who has been asking for a divorce.

Since the gambling house always wins, they figure that this is a foolproof scheme. What they don’t realize, of course, is that they’re complete fools, and that all such criminal enterprises eventually face justice.

Chaos descends quickly, with Frank putting the casino into heavy debt with high-end amenities, and the jollity comes to an abrupt end when Scott, threatening an accused cheater, unintentionally chops off his finger with a hatchet.

Light on the yucks but heavy on the yuk, “The House” becomes an onerous trial of the viewer’s attention span.

The film contains a lengthy gory sequence and frequent rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R.

 

Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.

 

Comments Off on ‘The House’ is for losers

‘All Eyez on Me’ insightful but offensive

June 19th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

By

Catholic News Service

Radical politics and the wayward values of hip-hop culture take “All Eyez on Me,” a sometimes intense but overlong and rarely insightful biography of rapper Tupac Shakur (Demetrius Shipp Jr.), off course.

Demetrius Shipp Jr. and Kat Graham star in a scene from the movie "All Eyez on Me." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive.  (CNS photo/Codeblack Films)

Demetrius Shipp Jr. and Kat Graham star in a scene from the movie “All Eyez on Me.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS photo/Codeblack Films)

Add to these elements a script so laden with obscenities that hardly a sentence of dialogue passes without a visit to the verbal gutter, and the film becomes endorsable for none.

Born into a family of Black Panther activists, Danai Gurira turns in a powerful performance as his mother, Afeni, the future singer and actor confronts the challenges of an inner-city childhood before gaining stardom. Afeni trains him to react to these circumstances partly by educating himself (he eventually becomes a Shakespeare aficionado) but also, more troublingly, through a revolutionary attitude apparently accepting of violence.

Beginning with these early scenes, the script, written by Jeremy Haft, Eddie Gonzalez and Steven Bagatourian, shows a lack of balance both in its wholesale sympathy for the Panthers and in its entirely negative portrayal of the police. It later depicts former Vice President Dan Quayle as a villain and a dunce for questioning the anti-law enforcement tenor of some of Shakur’s lyrics.

Structured around an interview with a fictional, and unnamed, journalist (Hill Harper) during a real stint in prison, the retrospective takes in Shakur’s lifelong friendship with Jada Pinkett (Kat Graham), his partnership with rage-prone producer Suge Knight (Dominic Santana) and his romance with Quincy Jones’ daughter, Kidada (Annie Ilonzeh).

Before achieving a more or less stable relationship with Kidada, albeit one that involves living together before marriage, Shakur is shown partaking in the decadent lifestyle often associated with celebrity. This includes group and casual sex as well as deviant acts. Although a minor character calls Shakur out on this behavior, overall, the movie’s tone is one of implicit acceptance.

Where narcotics are concerned, “All Eyez” adopts an ambivalent outlook. While Afeni struggles with addiction and Shakur himself consistently refuses hard drugs, smoking marijuana is presented as essentially harmless.

Rampant materialism, exemplified by bling jewelry and private jets, also plays a role in setting director Benny Boom’s dramatization at odds with faith-based values. While viewers will hardly begrudge the once impoverished Shakur the financial success he earned, the need to wear more than one gold Rolex watch at a time can be questioned.

In fact, rivalry for expensive trinkets may have played a role in the tragic end of Shakur’s story, his still unsolved murder on the streets of Las Vegas 21 years ago. As a postscript to the picture points out, Shakur’s brief life, he died aged 25, was at least as much marked by creativity as by controversy. But if there are lessons to be learned from it, they are not to be found in “All Eyez on Me.”

The film contains some violence and gore, strong sexual content, including aberrant behavior, cohabitation and rear and upper female nudity, drug use, about a dozen profanities and relentless rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R.

 

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

Comments Off on ‘All Eyez on Me’ insightful but offensive

‘Rough Night’ is dead on arrival

June 15th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

By

Catholic News Service

“Weekend at Bernie’s” meets “Bridesmaids” in the raunchy comedy “Rough Night.” The result is pure dreck.

Political candidate and bride-to-be Jess Thayer (Scarlett Johansson) joins her four best friends — Aussie ditz Pippa (Kate McKinnon), overeager misfit Alice (Jillian Bell), social justice warrior Frankie (Ilana Glazer) and self-satisfied rich lady Blair (Zoe Kravitz) — for a wild bachelorette weekend in Miami.

Zoe Kravitz, Jillian Bell, Scarlett Johansson, Kate McKinnon, and Illana Grazer star in a scene from the movie "Rough Night." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive. .(CNS photo/Sony)

Zoe Kravitz, Jillian Bell, Scarlett Johansson, Kate McKinnon, and Illana Grazer star in a scene from the movie “Rough Night.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. .(CNS photo/Sony)

After doing shots and snorting cocaine, they summon a stripper (Ryan Cooper) to the house they’ve been loaned. But the fun comes to a screeching halt when Alice, who could afford to go on a diet, accidentally kills burlesque boy by impulsively jumping into his lap, overturning his chair and smashing the back of his head into the corner of a stone hearth.

As the quintet scrambles to hide the evidence, fearing, for barely tenable reasons, that the police will not believe their story, director and co-writer Lucia Aniello’s film runs the gamut of smut. Early on, the script (on which Aniello collaborated with Paul W. Downs, who also plays Jess’ nice-guy fiance, Peter) winsomely tips us off to the fact that, back in college, Frankie and Blair were lovers.

Later the screenplay introduces us to Lea and Pietro (Demi Moore and Ty Burrell), the randy swingers who live next door. Plot developments find Blair forced into an encounter with this duo while Peter, who knows that Jess is in some kind of trouble, dons diapers and chugs Red Bull for a marathon drive to Florida to save the day.

Along the way to the supposedly friendship-affirming conclusion, such inherently hilarious subjects as contraception, venereal disease and personal hygiene are milked for laughs. And, as Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman discovered all those years ago in the first movie referred to above, there’s really no sight gag funnier than propping up a corpse.

The film contains strong sexual content, including aberrant behavior, nudity and a benign view of homosexual acts, cohabitation, drug use, some gory images, constant vulgar humor, several uses of profanity and pervasive rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R, restricted

 

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

Comments Off on ‘Rough Night’ is dead on arrival

‘Baywatch’ draws audience into polluted shallows

May 25th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

By

Catholic News Service

Eye candy and escapism were the draw of the television series from which director Seth Gordon’s action comedy “Baywatch” has been adapted.

Dwayne Johnson and Zac Efron star in a scene from the movie "Baywatch." The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. (CNS/Paramount)

Dwayne Johnson and Zac Efron star in a scene from the movie “Baywatch.” The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. (CNS/Paramount)

Whatever success the show, which began on NBC but had a longer life in syndication, may have had back in the 1990s, it takes more than an ensemble of good-looking people running around in bathing suits to sustain a feature film.

And, since neither Gordon nor screenwriters Damian Shannon and Mark Swift can seem to decide whether they’re out to make a pop-culture spoof or a crime-solving adventure, their film turns out to be a predictably shallow mess.

Matters are not helped by the absurdly earnest tone in which the conflict at the center of the plot is put forward to the audience. This clash pits newcomer Matt Brody (Zac Efron) against Mitch Buchannon (Dwayne Johnson), the longtime leader of the lifeguarding team of the title.

A disgraced Olympic swimmer whose selfish ways and fondness for partying cost his team a medal, Matt bucks against Mitch’s ethos of cooperation and mutual concern. As the dialogue heavy-handedly seeks to drive home, however, lives could be endangered if Matt doesn’t learn to collaborate with his new colleagues.

Like the group’s sober-toned effort to foil scheming real-estate developer and possible drug dealer Victoria Leeds (Priyanka Chopra), talk about the potentially fatal consequences of Matt’s ego-driven mistakes rings hollow when interspersed with lingering views of barely clad bodies.

The serious sleuthing also jars against the surfeit of low-minded humor in “Baywatch,” much of which displays a preoccupation with male characters’ crotches. This misguided motif reaches a low point with a prolonged sight gag involving the private parts of a cadaver. While the movie’s self-conscious flesh peddling is mostly just tiresome, this effort to reap gross-out giggles from less appealing anatomy registers as degrading.

The film contains some gunplay and physical violence with momentary but extreme gore, strong sexual content, including full nudity and off-screen nonmarital activity, several profanities and a few milder oaths as well as pervasive crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R.

 

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

Comments Off on ‘Baywatch’ draws audience into polluted shallows

Avoid the ‘CHIPS’

March 24th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

By

 

Catholic News Service

Get your motor running, spring yourself from a cage out on Highway 9, do whatever it takes to get away from the mind-numbing, motorcycle-bedecked comedy “CHIPS.”

Dax Shepard and Michael Pena star in a scene from the movie "Chips." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive. (CNS/Warner Bros.)

Dax Shepard and Michael Pena star in a scene from the movie “Chips.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS/Warner Bros.)

The humor in this twist on the 1977-1983 NBC-TV drama series quickly skids off the road and into the gutter, where it remains.

Dax Shepard, who also wrote and directed, plays rookie California Highway Patrol officer Jon Baker while Michael Pena portrays Jon’s first partner, and odd-couple counterpart, Frank “Ponch” Poncherello. Supposedly a veteran of the force from another part of the state, Ponch is in fact an undercover FBI agent investigating a corruption case.

As Jon makes a nudge of himself and Ponch gripes about it (until of course, the two inevitably bond), the script lurches from one base topic to another. We visit a locker room where the awkwardness of two straight men embracing while dressed only in their underwear is both played for laughs and discussed: Is being uncomfortable with such a gesture symptomatic of homophobia? Yes, no, ha, ha ha.

We stroll through more than one parking lot so that Ponch and the camera can ogle women in yoga pants as they bend over to put something in the trunk. We already know that Ponch is a philanderer since, as the opening sequence has shown us, he has to write down the name of the girl in bed with him lest he forget it in the morning.

That’s not to mention an extended exchange between the two leads on the enthralling question of why Ponch stops to use the bathroom so often.

There’s also a vaguely pro-divorce message to “CHIPS.” Jon, a washed-up extreme-sports motorcyclist, initially becomes a police recruit in an effort to win back his estranged wife, Karen (Kristen Bell), whose dad was a cop. But he eventually discovers, with Ponch’s help, that Karen is so selfish and greedy, he’s better off without her.

Since juvenile potty and bedroom gags must nowadays be rounded out with nauseating visuals, late developments include the decapitation of one character and the loss of four fingers by another. Lavish attention is paid to the bloody stumps as well as to the dismembered digits lying about like so many stubby breadsticks.

Our advice? Let these “CHIPS” fall where they may. And leave them there.

The film contains scenes of gross-out gore, strong sexual content, including brief graphic activity, masturbation and full male and female nudity, much sexual and scatological humor, frequent profanity and pervasive rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

Comments Off on Avoid the ‘CHIPS’

‘Logan’ presents dreary killing fest

March 3rd, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

By

Catholic News Service

Moviegoers unwise enough to take in a showing of “Logan,” the 10th installment of the Marvel Comics-based X-Men series, will discover that the very first word of the dialogue is a four-letter one beginning with “F” and the last image of the film is sacrilegious.

Patrick Stewart and Hugh Jackman star in a scene from the movie "Logan." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive.  (CNS photo/Fox)

Patrick Stewart and Hugh Jackman star in a scene from the movie “Logan.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS photo/Fox)

In between, the grumpy mutant of the title (Hugh Jackman), a character better known as Wolverine, uses his machete-like claws to perforate all who threaten him.

His main adversary is Donald Pierce (Boyd Holbrook). Pierce is an agent of Transigen, a company that has set itself the goal of eliminating all mutants not under their control.

That includes Logan’s current housemates, Professor Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart) and the albino Caliban (Stephen Merchant), as well as Laura (Dafne Keen), a young girl with blades like his own who, as the plot progresses, comes under Logan’s reluctant protection.

Set in the near future, director James Mangold’s action adventure poses as a redemption story for its bad-tempered protagonist. Logan gradually has his disgust with the world softened by Laura’s presence. He also improves his strained relationship with Charles.

But in the midst of all that, he carries on a spree of beheadings, impalements and limb lopping as he vents his anger and his enemies. Worse yet, Laura behaves in a similarly vicious manner, balletically jumping form one extra’s back to the next one’s shoulders as she, so to speak, digs in.

As though this duo wasn’t enough, Transigen has been developing another blade wielder who, once unleashed, starts to get under Logan’s skin.

The upshot is a dreary killing fest that’s gutsy in all the wrong ways.

The film contains excessive gory violence, upper female nudity, about a half-dozen uses of profanity and pervasive rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R.

 

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

Comments Off on ‘Logan’ presents dreary killing fest

‘Fist Fight’ a dirty jokes mess in the parking lot after school

February 22nd, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

By

Catholic News Service

We have to inquire: What kinds of audience laughter are the makers of the misbegotten “Fist Fight” going for?

Broad guffaws at human frailties? Nope, none of that. Expansive hoots at outrageous physical comedy? Again, not here.

Charlie Day and Ice Cube star in a scene from the movie "Fist Fight." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive. (CNS photo/Warner Bros.)

Charlie Day and Ice Cube star in a scene from the movie “Fist Fight.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS photo/Warner Bros.)

That leaves bitter, humorless sneering at various forms of human degradation. If there’s a sweet spot for that, this film has found it.

Director Richie Keen and screenwriters Van Robichaux and Evan Susser have constructed this unpleasant mess as a series of dirty jokes.

It’s the last day of the academic year at a crumbling Atlanta public high school, which has a tradition of year-end senior pranks. So a lot of these, usually involving crude sexual imagery or animal abuse, go on while the faculty worry about impending layoffs.

Nebbishy English teacher Andy Campbell (Charlie Day) is fearful of losing his job because his wife is pregnant. And Strickland (Ice Cube), the only member of the staff who actually stands up to the pranksters, does so with nearly feral outbursts in a misguided attempt to maintain his dignity and authority.

Finally, Strickland has had too much of the high jinks and, with Andy in tow, goes after a student with a fire axe. Principal Tyler (Dean Norris) then has to decide, before the last bell, which one of the two is going to get the figurative axe as a result. With some urging from Andy, he chooses Strickland.

So Strickland challenges Andy to an after-school brawl in the parking lot, and the ensuing complications take up the rest of the plot, with much ridicule directed at Andy’s fears along the way.

The film contains strong sexual content, including pornographic images and masturbation, drug use and pervasive rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R, restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

 

Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.

 

Comments Off on ‘Fist Fight’ a dirty jokes mess in the parking lot after school

Damonds are still a girl’s best friend in ‘Fifty Shades Darker’

February 10th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

By

Catholic News Service

To beat or not to beat, that is the question in the sordid sequel “Fifty Shades Darker.” Sensible people won’t care a whip, er, a whit what the answer is.

Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan star in a scene from the movie "50 Shades Darker." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive. (CNS photo/Universal)

Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan star in a scene from the movie “50 Shades Darker.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS photo/Universal)

Extending a franchise whose appeal seems to be that it offers armchair submissives the erotic equivalent of ordering Fra Diavolo sauce in an Italian restaurant, director James Foley pads out his adaptation of E.L. James’ novel, the second in a trilogy, heaven help us, with nonsexual scenes that range from the boring to the ridiculous. So anyone with a higher interest than mere prurience will be disappointed.

Yearning to revive his relationship with book editor Anastasia Steele (Dakota Johnson), who doesn’t share his interest in dungeon doings, sadist Seattle billionaire Christian Grey (Jamie Dornan) struggles to control his urges. Whether Mr. Kinky Boots can kick the habit is one of the least compelling questions imaginable, however, and so the mind wanders to other matters.

Is it not pretentious for anyone unrelated to the Romanovs to bear the weighty name Anastasia? Why, in this film’s version of the Emerald City, does it only rain when our heroine is depressed? What would Henry James make of E.L.?

The sketchy plot is founded on a dubious backstory. Christian, we are led to believe, acquired his disordered tastes from a combination of childhood physical abuse and the later tutelage of his adoptive mother Grace’s (Marcia Gay Harden) friend, Elena Lincoln (Kim Basinger), whom Christian nicknames Mrs. Robinson. Koo-koo-ka-choo.

We will leave it to the professionals to explain how plausible it is that Christian has switched sides in the bondage game, going from taking punishment at Elena’s hands to dishing it out to a succession of partners. Equally puzzling is the idea that being mistreated by a man early in life would inspire a mania for walloping women. But there it is.

As for Anastasia, presumably in order to keep things frisky, she occasionally takes a walk on the wild side. But the next minute, she’s back to freaking out over Christian’s 31-flavors approach to bedroom behavior.

To give the movie its due, the central duo does move toward acquiring outward respectability and lending permanence to their bond. So, if there’s a moral to be drawn from Anastasia’s saga, perhaps it’s this: A smack on the butt may be quite continental, but diamonds are still a girl’s best friend.

The film contains excessive sexual content, including aberrant acts, graphic activity and much nudity, several uses of profanity and occasional rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. restricted.  

 

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

Comments Off on Damonds are still a girl’s best friend in ‘Fifty Shades Darker’

‘Moonlight’ — powerful, compelling and morally offensive

February 8th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

By

Catholic News Service

Considered as an exploration of the African-American experience in contemporary society, writer-director Barry Jenkins’ powerfully understated drama “Moonlight” makes a compelling statement. 

Alex Hibbert and Mahershala Ali star in a scene from "Moonlight." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive. (CNS /A24)

Alex Hibbert and Mahershala Ali star in a scene from “Moonlight.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS /A24)

As the film chronicles three stages in the life of an inner-city Miami youth, however, aspects of its main character’s personal story raise complications for viewers of faith.

As a bullied and withdrawn 10-year-old, burdened with a crack-addicted mother (Naomie Harris), Chiron (Alex Hibbert), derisively nicknamed Little, comes under the surprisingly positive influence of local drug dealer Juan (Mahershala Ali). Juan’s gentle girlfriend, Teresa (Janelle Monae), becomes a more predictable mentor, taking on the role of a second mom.

One of the few other bright spots in Chiron’s bleak existence is his friendship with schoolmate Kevin (Jaden Piner) who proves much more accepting of Chiron than the lad’s other peers.

Reaching his teens, Chiron (now Ashton Sanders) falls for Kevin (now Jharrel Jerome). Although Kevin boasts (apparently truthfully) of his prowess with women, he willingly participates in a single sexual act with Chiron. But circumstances soon set them cruelly at odds with each other.

Once grown, and now played by Trevante Rhodes, Chiron has himself become a pusher with a grim persona symbolized by his latest moniker, Black. He lives an isolated and shady life until an unexpected reunion opens up emotional possibilities for him.

The relationship at the heart of the film is dealt with in a restrained and thoughtful way, with spiritual affinity far outweighing eroticism and fidelity leading to sexual reserve. Yet the physical expression of the bond is presented as acceptable, making it impossible to endorse “Moonlight” for any age group.

In fact, the temptation to let sympathy blur moral borders is all the more potent here because immensely likable, terribly downtrodden Chiron has the audience rooting for him all the way. So, too, does compassionate Kevin. Yet commiseration needs to be clear-eyed where ethical truths, especially those taught both by Scripture and tradition, are at stake.

The film contains tacit endorsement of homosexual acts, mature themes, including narcotics use and prostitution, a graphic heterosexual and a semi-graphic same-sex encounter, several mild oaths, frequent rough and crude language and some vulgar sex talk. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R, restricted

 

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

Comments Off on ‘Moonlight’ — powerful, compelling and morally offensive
Marquee Powered By Know How Media.