Home » Posts tagged 'canonization'

Salvador’s Blessed Romero canonization probably in Rome in October

By

WASHINGTON — During an April 11 homily in Washington, Salvadoran Archbishop Jose Luis Escobar Alas said the canonization of Blessed Oscar Romero will “probably” be in Rome and “probably” take place at end of October after a meeting of bishops.

He hedged his statement in an interview with Catholic News Service saying the final decision is up to Pope Francis. Read more »

Comments Off on Salvador’s Blessed Romero canonization probably in Rome in October

Salvadoran: Blessed Romero, family friend, used visits to escape horrors

By

Catholic News Service

SANTA TECLA, El Salvador — Leonor Chacon remembers every emotion she felt March 24, 1980, as if it were yesterday.

It started, she recalls, with the happiness that always accompanied the expectation that Archbishop Oscar Romero of San Salvador would be coming to eat with her family in the small city of Santa Tecla, just west of the Salvadoran capital. Read more »

Comments Off on Salvadoran: Blessed Romero, family friend, used visits to escape horrors

Pope recognizes miracle attributed to Fatima visionaries

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis has approved the recognition of a miracle attributed to the intercession of two of the shepherd children who saw Our Lady of Fatima in 1917, thus paving the way for their canonization.

Pope Francis signed the decree for the causes of Blesseds Francisco and Jacinta Marto during a meeting March 23 with Cardinal Angelo Amato, prefect of the Congregation for Saints’ Causes, the Vatican said.  

Pilgrims walk on their knees at the Marian shrine of Fatima in central Portugal in this 2012 file photo. (CNS photo/Rafael Marchante, Reuters)

Pilgrims walk on their knees at the Marian shrine of Fatima in central Portugal in this 2012 file photo. (CNS photo/Rafael Marchante, Reuters)

The recognition of the miracle makes it likely that the canonization ceremony for the two children will be scheduled soon. The cardinals and bishops who are members of the congregation must vote to recommend their canonization and then the pope would convene the cardinals resident in Rome for a consistory to approve the sainthood.

Many people are hoping Pope Francis will preside over the canonization ceremony during his visit to Fatima May 12-13.

The pilgrimage will mark the 100th anniversary of the Marian apparitions, which began May 13, 1917, when 9-year-old Francisco and 7-year-old Jacinta, along with their cousin Lucia dos Santos, reported seeing the Virgin Mary. The apparitions continued once a month until Oct. 13, 1917, and later were declared worthy of belief by the Catholic Church.

A year after the apparitions, both of the Marto children became ill during an influenza epidemic that plagued Europe. Francisco died April 4, 1919, at the age of 10, while Jacinta succumbed to her illness Feb. 20, 1920, at the age of 9.

Francisco and Jacinta’s cause for canonization was stalled for decades due to a debate on whether non-martyred children have the capacity to understand heroic virtues at a young age. However, in 1979, St. John Paul II allowed their cause to proceed; he declared them venerable in 1989 and beatified them in 2000.

Their cousin Lucia entered the Institute of the Sisters of St. Dorothy and, later, obtained permission to enter the Carmelite convent of St. Teresa in Coimbra, where she resided until her death in 2005 at the age of 97.

Following her death, Pope Benedict XVI waived the five-year waiting period before her sainthood cause could open. Bishop Virgilio Antunes of Coimbra formally closed the local phase of investigation into her life and holiness Feb. 13, 2017, and forwarded the information to the Vatican.

Also March 23, Pope Francis signed other decrees recognizing miracles, martyrdom and heroic virtues in six other causes, the Vatican said.

The pope also approved the bishops’ and cardinals’ vote to canonize two Brazilian priests — Blessed Andre de Soveral and Blessed Ambrosio Francisco Ferro — as well as Mateus Moreira and 27 laypeople, who were killed in 1645 as violence broke out between Portuguese Catholics and Dutch Calvinists in Brazil.

Pope Francis also approved the vote to canonize three young Mexican martyrs, known as the child martyrs of Tlaxcala, who were among the first native converts in Mexico. Known only by their first names —Cristobal, Antonio and Juan — they were killed in 1529 for rejecting idolatry and polygamy in the name of their faith.

In addition, Pope Francis signed a decree recognizing the martyrdom of Franciscan Claretian Sister Rani Maria Vattalil, who died in 1995 after being stabbed 54 times, apparently because of her work helping poor women in India organize themselves. With the signing of the decree, a date can be set for her beatification.

 

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

Comments Off on Pope recognizes miracle attributed to Fatima visionaries

Pope canonizes seven saints who ‘fought the good fight of faith’

By

Catholic News Service
VATICAN CITY (CNS) — The seven new saints of the church were holy not because of their own efforts but because of “the Lord who triumphs in them and with them,” Pope Francis said.
Each one “struggled to the very end with all their strength,” which they received through perseverance and prayer, the pope said Oct. 16 at a canonization Mass in St. Peter’s Square. Read more »

Comments Off on Pope canonizes seven saints who ‘fought the good fight of faith’

‘We will continue to call her ‘Mother’

By

and Cindy Wooden

Catholic News Service

Pope canonizes St. Teresa of Kolkata, ‘a generous dispenser of God’s mercy’

VATICAN CITY — With a large tapestry bearing the portrait of the woman known as the “Saint of the Gutters” suspended above him, Pope Francis proclaimed the sainthood of Mother Teresa of Kolkata, hailing her courage and love for the poor.

Despite the formality of the occasion though, “her sanctity is so close to us, so tender and fruitful, that spontaneously we will continue to call her ‘’Mother Teresa,’” Pope Francis said to applause at the canonization Mass Sept. 4. Read more »

Comments Off on ‘We will continue to call her ‘Mother’

U.S. pilgrims say they always knew Mother Teresa was a saint

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Joining tens of thousands of people at the Vatican to celebrate the newly declared St. Teresa of Kolkata, many U.S. pilgrims said it was about time Mother Teresa officially had the title.

A tapestry of St. Teresa of Kolkata is seen on the facade of St. Peter's Basilica as Pope Francis celebrates her canonization Mass at the Vatican Sept. 4. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

A tapestry of St. Teresa of Kolkata is seen on the facade of St. Peter’s Basilica as Pope Francis celebrates her canonization Mass at the Vatican Sept. 4. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Organized diocesan and parish pilgrimages generally had a priest-chaplain with them, celebrating daily Masses and joining them on tours. But many people came on their own or with their immediate family; the Missionaries of Charity — priests, brothers and nuns — organized Masses and tours for them, too.

At the Basilica of St. Anastasia Sept. 2, English-speaking pilgrims, most of whom were not part of a tour group, gathered for a Mass celebrated by Indian Cardinal Telesphore Toppo of Ranchi.

Mother Teresa was “an iconic personality of mercy and service,” the cardinal said. “She drank, from the font of Jesus, the living water of love.”

The 76-year-old cardinal said that when he was a new, young bishop in the late 1970s, he accompanied Mother Teresa on a car trip to visit some of her projects. Knowing how hard she worked, “I found the courage to ask, ‘Where do you get your strength from?’ The answer came from her like a bullet: ‘From Jesus in the Eucharist.’”

Deacon John and Arlene Storm from the Diocese of Santa Rosa, California, were among those at the Mass. The deacon is involved in prison ministry and what he terms “restorative justice,” a combination of advocacy and one-on-one ministry aimed at rehabilitating prisoners and promoting reconciliation between them and the victims of their crimes.

Mother Teresa was criticized during her lifetime for not using her high profile to do more to press governments to remedy the injustices that kept so many people so poor. While Deacon Storm’s work combines promoting justice on an institutional level as well as showing concrete care for individuals, he said not everyone has to do both. “She had a wonderful ministry of her own.”

His wife added, “I don’t care if you are Christ, someone will say you are wrong,” but Mother Teresa “did wonderful works” and members of her order continue that today.

Arturo Martinez, a young man from Miami, showed up at the Mass alone. “I love this lady, Mother Teresa, so I thought I would see Rome and honor her at the same time,” he said before rushing into the church.

Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Parish in Woodinville, Washington, organized a pilgrimage for 87 people, about 10 percent of the parish membership. Because most of the staff was heading to Rome, Father Frank Schuster said, the parish website, bulletin and sign were changed to “St. Teresa of Calcutta” Aug. 31 before the group set off.

“When we built the church we made sure the sign was on snaps because we knew all along that mother church would recognize what we all knew: Mother Teresa is a saint,” Father Schuster said during a brief interview at Rome’s Basilica of St. Mary Major.

Honoring Mother Teresa on the outside of the building obviously is not enough, said the pastor of the parish in the Archdiocese of Seattle. “She said everything begins with prayer. We want to have as close a relationship with Jesus as she did, to see Jesus in others and reach out to them.”

For four months in the spring, the parish hosted Camp Unity Eastside, a tent encampment for people experiencing homelessness. Different churches and community organizations take turns providing land for the encampment, showers for the residents and a place for distributing meals. “It was amazing to be Mother Teresa to these people,” said Meg Nafziger, a member of the parish staff.

Nafziger described Mother Teresa as “my mentor,” the person who helped her accept her own suffering and care for her mother, then her father and then her husband, who all developed cancer and died within a short time of one another.

“I would put my hands on the feet of our bronze statue of Mother Teresa and pray that I would have some of her strength,” she said. “She taught me how to see Jesus in the eyes of others and to do small things with great love.”

“I was suffering along with them,” Nafziger said of her loved ones, “but I was feeling that joy — defiant joy,” telling herself, “I will suffer through this so someone else might be blessed.”

Allen Larpenteur, another parishioner, said he and his wife, Suzi, always wanted to visit Rome and so the canonization was a perfect opportunity to do it. Belonging to a parish named after Mother Teresa was less a motivation for the pilgrimage than honoring Mother Teresa was, he said.

“This beautiful nun was not beautiful from a physical standpoint,” he said, “but from a spiritual and a compassionate viewpoint, she is beyond words. She did not consider herself anything in God’s eyes, but she saw God’s eyes in the dying, the poor and the outcast.”

Mother Teresa “took great chances to help the neediest when others would ignore them,” he said, and “Pope Francis cares about the outcast as much as Mother Teresa did.”

The 71-year-old Larpenteur said he had expected the parish would need to change its name long before now. Waiting 19 years after Mother Teresa’s death in 1997 “seems like a long time to formally recognize someone as a saint whom we all knew was a saint,” he said.

Follow Wooden on Twitter: @Cindy_Wooden

Comments Off on U.S. pilgrims say they always knew Mother Teresa was a saint

New portrait of Mother Teresa unveiled in Washington

By

Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON — On the eve of her canonization as a saint, Mother Teresa of Kolkata, who famously disliked being photographed, was immortalized with the unveiling of a dramatic portrait at the St. John Paul II National Shrine.

Artist Chas Fagan, assisted by two members of Mother Teresa’s Missionaries of Charity congregation, unveiled his oil painting, “St. Teresa of Calcutta: Carrier of God’s Love,” Sept. 1.

Sisters from the Missionaries of Charity admire the official canonization portrait of Blessed Teresa of Kolkata just after its unveiling Sept. 1 at the St. John Paul II National Shrine in Washington. The image will be displayed during her canonization at the Vatican Sept. 4. (CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Catholic Standard)

Sisters from the Missionaries of Charity admire the official canonization portrait of Blessed Teresa of Kolkata just after its unveiling Sept. 1 at the St. John Paul II National Shrine in Washington. The image will be displayed during her canonization at the Vatican Sept. 4. (CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Catholic Standard)

The painting was chosen as the official canonization portrait. It was commissioned by the Knights of Columbus.

A reproduction of the portrait was unfurled earlier the same day as a large tapestry on the facade of St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican. It was to serve as a backdrop for Pope Francis’ Sept. 4 canonization Mass for Mother Teresa.

In Washington the sight of the portrait drew excited gasps and smiles from the 17 members of the Missionaries of Charity attending the ceremony.

“She’s our mother. Now she’s the mother of the whole world. She’s a saint for the church. She’s not just our own. We’ve given her to the world,” said Sister Tanya, superior of the Gift of Peace home in Washington, where the Missionaries of Charity serve elderly, poor, sick and homeless people.

The Knights of Columbus printed more than 1 million prayer cards with the official portrait. They will be distributed at the canonization Mass and given to Missionaries of Charity and the people they serve around the world.

Fagan smiled and said artists dream of seeing a positive reaction to their work like the sisters offered, but that he thought “the credit lies more with the subject than the painting.”

The artist said that he, like millions of people around the world, admired Mother Teresa for her loving service of the poor and her humility. Fagan, who has painted and sculpted portraits of U.S. presidents, said capturing the essence of the nun known around the world was a daunting task.

He explained that he found his “hook” with a simple quote of the saint-to-be that someone shared: “Joy is strength.” He said the phrase helped him feel like he knew Mother Teresa and guided the composition and the expression that he painted on her face.

“Every time I lifted up the brush, that quote was going through my head. Mother Teresa lived that. She was a diminutive, yet earthshaking figure,” the artist said.

Fagan said he spent about a month on preparatory sketches before beginning the portrait, which took about six weeks to complete. “Mother Teresa brought joy to my studio, to my home. Now I will miss her company,” he said.

The painting shows Mother Teresa smiling warmly and looking to the side, with a subtle halo over her head. She is wearing her community’s trademark white sari-styled habit with blue trim. A member of the Missionaries of Charity serving in Charlotte, North Carolina, posed for the artist so he could capture the folds of their distinctive habit accurately.

The painting was to be displayed at the Knights of Columbus Museum in New Haven, Connecticut, for several weeks except for events in New York Sept. 8-9, and a Sept. 10 Mass of Thanksgiving at St. Patrick’s Cathedral celebrating the canonization. It eventually will be given to the Missionaries of Charity.

A second painting depicting Mother Teresa and St. John Paul II also was unveiled at the shrine Sept. 1.

The painting by Russian-born artist Igor Babailov, depicts St. John Paul II and Mother Teresa standing together in front of 22 young children of different races and cultural backgrounds. The girls are wearing white first Communion dresses and the boys also are in white. A toddler is similarly attired.

The pope offers a blessing and Mother Teresa’s hands are folded in prayer. The painting, donated to the shrine by the artist, is called “Credo,” the Latin word meaning to believe and follow.

The unveiling followed a Mass of thanksgiving for the canonization of Mother Teresa celebrated by Archbishop Christophe Pierre, the apostolic nuncio to the United States, at the shrine’s Redemptor Hominis Church.

 

Zimmermann is editor of the Catholic Standard, newspaper of the Archdiocese of Washington.

Comments Off on New portrait of Mother Teresa unveiled in Washington

Blessed Teresa to be canonized Sept. 4; pope sets other sainthood dates

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis will declare Blessed Teresa of Kolkata a saint at the Vatican Sept. 4.

A poster of Blessed Teresa of Kolkata and Missionaries of Charity are seen in Kolkata, India, in this Sept. 5, 2007, file photo. Pope Francis will declare her a saint at the Vatican Sept. 4, the conclusion of the Year of Mercy jubilee for those engaged in works of mercy. (CNS photo/Jayanta Shaw, Reuters)

A poster of Blessed Teresa of Kolkata and Missionaries of Charity are seen in Kolkata, India, in this Sept. 5, 2007, file photo. Pope Francis will declare her a saint at the Vatican Sept. 4, the conclusion of the Year of Mercy jubilee for those engaged in works of mercy. (CNS photo/Jayanta Shaw, Reuters)

The date was announced March 15 during an “ordinary public consistory,” a meeting of the pope, cardinals and promoters of sainthood causes that formally ends the sainthood process.

At the same consistory, the pope set June 5 as the date for the canonizations of Blessed Stanislaus Papczynski of Poland, founder of the Marian Fathers of the Immaculate Conception, and Blessed Mary Elizabeth Hesselblad of Sweden, who re-founded the Bridgettine sisters.

In addition, Pope Francis declared that Oct. 16 he would celebrate Mass for the canonizations of Argentina’s “gaucho priest,” Blessed Jose Brochero, and Blessed Jose Sanchez del Rio, a 14-year-old Mexican boy martyred for refusing to renounce his faith during the Cristero War of the 1920s.

Setting the dates concludes a long process of studying the lives and writings of the sainthood candidates:

  • Mother Teresa was widely known as a living saint as she ministered to the sick and the dying in some of the poorest neighborhoods in the world. Although some people criticized her for not also challenging the injustices that kept so many people so poor and abandoned, her simple service touched the hearts of millions of people of all faiths.

Born to an ethnic Albanian family in Skopje, in what is now part of Macedonia, she went to India in 1929 as a Sister of Loreto and became an Indian citizen in 1947. She founded the Missionaries of Charity in 1950.

Shortly after she died in 1997, St. John Paul II waived the usual five-year waiting period and allowed the opening of the process to declare her sainthood. She was beatified in 2003.

After her beatification, Missionary of Charity Father Brian Kolodiejchuk, the postulator of her sainthood cause, published a book of her letters, “Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light.” The letters illustrated how, for decades, she experienced what is described as a “dark night of the soul” in Christian spirituality; she felt that God had abandoned her. While the letters shocked some people, others saw them as proof of her steadfast faith in God, which was not based on feelings or signs that he was with her.

The date chosen for her canonization is the eve of the 19th anniversary of her death and the date previously established at the Vatican for the conclusion of the Year of Mercy pilgrimage of people like her who are engaged in works of mercy.

  • Blessed Papczynski founded the Marian Fathers of the Immaculate Conception in Poland in the 17th century. Today the Marians are special promoters of the Divine Mercy devotion of St. Faustina Kowalska.

Born in 1631, he was ordained as a Piarist priest, but left the order after 10 years. His new congregation was established officially in 1679 and he died in 1701. He was beatified in Poland in 2007.

  • Blessed Hesselblad was born in Faglavik, Sweden, in 1870 and went to the United States at the age of 18 in search of work to help support her family. She studied nursing in New York and, impressed by the faith of the Catholics she cared for, began the process of entering the Catholic Church. Coming from a Lutheran family, she was conditionally baptized by a Jesuit priest in Washington, D.C. On a pilgrimage to Rome, she visited the home of the 14th-century St. Brigid of Sweden and was welcomed by the Carmelite sisters who were then living there.

She received permission from the pope to make religious vows under the rule of St. Brigid and re-found the Bridgettine order that had died out in Sweden after the Protestant Reformation. She was beatified in 2000.

  • Blessed Brochero, the “gaucho priest,” was born in Argentina in 1840 and died in 1914. Ordained for the Archdiocese of Cordoba, he spent years traveling far and wide by mule to reach his flock. Pope Francis, in a message in 2013 for the priest’s beatification, a ceremony scheduled before the Argentine pope was elected, said Father Brochero truly had “the smell of his sheep.”

He gained particular fame for his work caring for the sick and dying during a cholera epidemic in 1867. With his own hands, he built churches and chapels and opened paths through the western mountains of Cordoba province. During his travels, he contracted Hansen’s disease, more commonly known as leprosy; many people believe he was infected by sharing a cup of mate, an herbal tea, with someone who already had the disease.

  • Blessed Sanchez was martyred in Mexico in 1928, just weeks before his 15th birthday. In 1926 Mexican President Plutarco Elias Calles had introduced tough anti-clerical laws and confiscated church property across the country. Some 90,000 people were killed in the ensuing Cristero war before the government and church reached an accord in 1929.

Young Sanchez wanted to fight in the war alongside his brothers, but he was too young. Eventually, he was allowed to be the flag bearer of a unit. During an intense battle, he was captured by government troops, who ordered him to renounce his faith. He refused, even when tortured. The boy was executed about two weeks later. He was beatified in 2005.

Comments Off on Blessed Teresa to be canonized Sept. 4; pope sets other sainthood dates

Pope Francis declares Blessed Junipero Serra a saint during Mass at National Shrine

By

Catholic News Service

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Here is a timeline of key points in the life and ministry of Junipero Serra, the 18th-century Spanish missionary to California. Pope Francis canonized the Franciscan friar a saint Sept. 23 during his visit to Washington. Read more »

Comments Off on Pope Francis declares Blessed Junipero Serra a saint during Mass at National Shrine

Serra canonization should be call to respect cultures, Franciscan superior says

By

Catholic News Service

ROME — The canonization of Blessed Junipero Serra honors a famous missionary who was motivated by love of God, but it also is a call to recognize how the process of evangelization must respect peoples and their cultures, said the head of the Franciscan order. Read more »

Comments Off on Serra canonization should be call to respect cultures, Franciscan superior says