Home » Posts tagged 'euthanasia'

Judge Gorsuch nominated to fill Supreme Court vacancy

By

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch to fill the seat on the U.S. Supreme Court that has been empty since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia last February.

Judge Neil Gorsuch speaks after U.S. President Donald Trump nominated him to be a U.S. Supreme Court justice Jan. 31 at the White House in Washington. If confirmed, Gorsuch will fill the seat that has been empty since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia last February. (CNS photo/Michael Reynolds, EPA)

Judge Neil Gorsuch speaks after U.S. President Donald Trump nominated him to be a U.S. Supreme Court justice Jan. 31 at the White House in Washington. If confirmed, Gorsuch will fill the seat that has been empty since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia last February. (CNS photo/Michael Reynolds, EPA)

Gorsuch is a man the country needs, Trump said in announcing his nominee the evening of Jan. 31. He added that his pick for the high court already has had bipartisan support. “Judge Gorsuch has outstanding legal skills, a brilliant mind, tremendous discipline,” he said.

When Trump announced his choice at the White House, in the audience was Maureen McCarthy Scalia, the widow of the late justice. One of the couple’s children also was present: Father Paul Scalia, a priest of the Diocese of Arlington, Virginia.

In his remarks, Gorsuch said he was thankful for friends, family and faith giving him balance. He also said he was honored and humbled to be chosen as a nominee to the nation’s highest court. He described Scalia as “lion of the law” and said he misses him.

He said he respects the fact that Congress, not the courts, writes new laws. “It is the role of judges to apply, not alter, the work of the people’s representatives. A judge who likes every outcome he reaches is very likely a bad judge, stretching for results he prefers rather than those the law demands.”

Several news outlets reported that hundreds of demonstrators held a rally outside the Supreme Court building to protest Trump’s choice of Gorsuch. Pro-life organizations, however, were quick to praise the president’s selection of someone who they said will “carry on the legacy” of Scalia.

Gorsuch, judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, is 49, making him the youngest Supreme Court nominee in 25 years. He was born in Denver. He currently lives outside of Boulder, Colorado, with his wife and two daughters, he lived in the Washington area as a teenager when his mother, Anne Gorsuch Burford, was appointed by President Ronald Reagan to head the Environmental Protection Agency. Gorsuch attended the Jesuit-run Georgetown Preparatory School where he won a national debate championship.

Gorsuch has the typical qualifications of a high court justice. He graduated from Columbia, Harvard and Oxford, clerked for two Supreme Court justices and also worked for the Department of Justice.

He also is an adjunct law professor at the University of Colorado and he wrote a 2009 book arguing against the legalization of assisted suicide and euthanasia.

Gorsuch hasn’t written a ruling specifically on abortion but he has strong views on religious liberty. He sided with the Little Sisters of the Poor in their challenge of the contraceptive mandate of the Affordable Care Act. And in Hobby Lobby Stores v. Sebelius, in June 2013, the 10th Circuit ordered the federal government to stop enforcement of the federal mandate against Hobby Lobby, the Oklahoma-based Christian chain of retail arts and crafts stores. In his concurrence, Gorsuch said the contraception mandate substantially burdened the company’s religious exercise, a decision the Supreme Court later upheld.

Gorsuch is an Episcopalian. Scalia, who had been one of six Catholic members of the court, was often described as its most conservative voice and known for his strict interpretation of the Constitution’s intent.

“All too often, our efforts to protect unborn children and other vulnerable humans have been overridden by judges who believe they have a right to impose their own policy preferences,” Carol Tobias, president of National Right to Life, said in a statement.

“We are heartened that Judge Gorsuch appears to share Justice Scalia’s view that federal judges are constrained to enforce the text and original intent of constitutional provisions, and on all other matters should defer to democratically elected lawmakers,” Tobias added.

Priests for Life, the American Life League, the Susan B. Anthony List and other groups echoed those sentiments.

Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List, called Gorsuch “an exceptional choice.”

“In the coming days, we will mobilize the pro-life grass-roots nationwide and in key Senate battleground states to urge the Senate to swiftly confirm” she said in a statement. “Should pro-abortion Democratic Senators choose to filibuster this immensely qualified nominee, they do so at their own political peril.”

Comments Off on Judge Gorsuch nominated to fill Supreme Court vacancy

Pope: Euthanasia is triumph of selfishness, not compassion

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Growing acceptance of euthanasia does not indicate increased compassion, but highlights the rise of a selfish “throwaway culture” that casts aside the sick, the dying and those who do not satisfy the perceived requirements of a healthy life, Pope Francis said.

Pope Francis greets a man while meeting the disabled during his general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican June 8. (In a culture that is increasingly “technological and individualistic,” some tend to “hide behind alleged compassion to justify killing a patient,” the pope said the next day. CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Pope Francis greets a man while meeting the disabled during his general audience in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican June 8. (In a culture that is increasingly “technological and individualistic,” some tend to “hide behind alleged compassion to justify killing a patient,” the pope said the next day. CNS photo/Paul Haring)

In a culture that is increasingly “technological and individualistic,” some tend to “hide behind alleged compassion to justify killing a patient,” the pope told health professionals from Spain and Latin America June 9.

“True compassion does not marginalize, humiliate or exclude, much less celebrate a patient passing away,” the pope said. “You know well that would mean the triumph of selfishness, of that ‘throwaway culture’ that rejects and despises people who do not meet certain standards of health, beauty or usefulness.”

Thanking doctors who care for “those who suffer in body and spirit,” Pope Francis insisted physicians’ identity as doctors does not depend solely on their knowledge or competence, but mainly on their compassion and mercy toward the sick.

“Compassion does not mean pity, it means ‘suffering with,’” the pope said. When physicians share in the suffering of their patients, he added, the “sacred value of the life of the patient does not disappear or become obscured.”

Pope Francis reminded the medical professionals of the biblical tradition of health care, citing the example of the good Samaritan “who does not pass by the injured person at the roadside, but rather moved by compassion, cures and attends to him.”

“The Christian medical tradition has always been inspired by the parable of the Good Samaritan, the pope said. It is about identifying with the love of the son of God, who ‘went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil, for God was with him.’”

However, he said, care for the sick requires patience, and doctors must not give in to “the functionalist temptation” of applying quick solutions that are motivated by “false compassion” or cost-efficiency.

“The dignity of human life is at stake; the dignity of the medical vocation is at stake,” the pope said. “Nothing must prevent you from putting more heart into your hands.”

 

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

Comments Off on Pope: Euthanasia is triumph of selfishness, not compassion

Synod report highlights pastoral care of society’s marginalized

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — While they did not grab headlines, the elderly and people with disabilities, openness to life and the plight of migrants and refugees were also on the agenda of the Synod of Bishops on the family.

A boy along with other visually impaired people walk during a rally to mark International White Cane Day in Yangon, Myanmar, Oct. 15. While they did not grab headlines, the topics of elderly and people with disabilities, openness to life and the plight of migrants and refugees were also on the agenda of the Synod of Bishops on the family. (CNS photo/Lynn Bo Bo, EPA)

A boy along with other visually impaired people walk during a rally to mark International White Cane Day in Yangon, Myanmar, Oct. 15. While they did not grab headlines, the topics of elderly and people with disabilities, openness to life and the plight of migrants and refugees were also on the agenda of the Synod of Bishops on the family. (CNS photo/Lynn Bo Bo, EPA)

The synod’s final report, which was approved Oct. 24, addressed the pastoral needs of those who are often cast aside to the margins of society, those who are often neglected and abandoned in a world that places profit over value.

Affirming the church’s teaching on the “sacred and inviolable character of human life,” the synod members not only denounced the tragedy of abortion, they also expressed their closeness to young mothers, abandoned children and those suffering the consequences of abortion.

The report also denounced euthanasia, saying that society is called to “care for the elderly, protect people with disabilities, assist the terminally ill, comfort the dying, and firmly reject the death penalty.”

One of the most important tasks of Christian families, the report said, is to “safeguard the bond between generations for the transmission of the faith.”

While birth rates are dwindling in Western countries, the report noted, the number of elderly people continue to rise and they are often “perceived as a burden” in increasingly industrialized societies. The synod fathers also praised the role of grandparents, whose presence within the family deserved “special attention” and are crucial in passing on the faith to future generations.

In the eyes of synod members, the situation of men, women and children scattered and divided due to war, persecution and poverty was another of the most heart-breaking situations affecting families.

Forced migration, which “traumatizes people and destabilizes the family,” requires a two-fold pastoral ministry not only for migrants, but also for the families they have left behind, the report said.

“Humanity’s history is a history of migrants: this truth is inscribed in the lives of people and of families,” the report said. “Our faith also stresses this: We are all pilgrims.”

The value of families who endure the difficulties of lovingly caring for members who have disabilities or special needs also was emphasized. Those families, the report said, “give the church and society a precious witness of faithfulness to the gift of life.”

“The family that accepts with the eyes of faith the presence of people with disabilities can recognize and guarantee the quality and value of every life, with its needs, its rights and its opportunities,” the report said.

Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, described the synod’s response to families of people with special needs as “among the most poetic areas” of the report.

It’s a particularly moving point for Archbishop Kurtz, whose older brother Georgie was born with Down syndrome.

“I don’t want to minimize the heroic nature of what people are going through, especially as they receive a child with special needs, but the gift is just extraordinary,” Archbishop Kurtz told journalists Oct. 25. This gift, he noted, was not only for his family but for his neighborhood, parish and town.

Following the death of their parents, Georgie lived with his younger brother in two rectories and a bishop’s house until his death in 2002. Archbishop Kurtz said that Georgie’s presence “changed the nature of those rectories.”

“They became a home,” the archbishop said. “I never anticipated that.”

 

A video to accompany this story can be found at https://youtu.be/oCU5Mvftjk0

Comments Off on Synod report highlights pastoral care of society’s marginalized

Pope Francis decries attacks on life — abortion, euthanasia, abandoning immigrants at sea, unsafe workplaces…

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Abortion, abandoning migrants at sea, unsafe working conditions, malnutrition, terrorism and euthanasia are all “attacks on life,” said Pope Francis.

In an audience with members of the Italian Science & Life Association May 30, the pope said “life is a gift” and urged more reflection on how people are treated throughout all stages of life.

Migrants are seen in a boat after being rescued in late April in the Mediterranean Sea. Abortion, abandoning migrants at sea, unsafe working conditions, malnutrition, terrorism and euthanasia are all "attacks on life," said Pope Francis. (CNS photo/Alessandro Di Meo, EPA)

Migrants are seen in a boat after being rescued in late April in the Mediterranean Sea. Abortion, abandoning migrants at sea, unsafe working conditions, malnutrition, terrorism and euthanasia are all “attacks on life,” said Pope Francis. (CNS photo/Alessandro Di Meo, EPA)

“The degree of progress of a civilization is measured precisely by its capacity to care for life, especially in its most fragile phases,” he told the association, which had gathered its members in Rome the previous day to mark its 10th anniversary.

“When we speak of humanity, let us never forget the attacks on the sacredness of human life,” he said. “The plague of abortion is an attack on life. Allowing our brothers and sisters to die in boats in the Strait of Sicily is an attack on life. Death at the workplace, because minimum safety conditions are not respected, is an attack on life. Death because of malnutrition is an attack on life. Terrorism, war, violence, euthanasia as well, is an attack on life.”

The pope affirmed the association’s work as important, especially in a society marked by a throwaway mentality, and urged its members to “relaunch a renewed culture of life.”

“To love life is to care always for others, to want their good, to cultivate and respect their transcendent dignity,” he said.

Pope Francis told association members to be “unafraid of undertaking fruitful dialogue with the entire world of science, even with those who do not profess to be believers but who remain open to the mystery of human life.”

Underlining the vital link between science and life, the pope said “it is the miracle of life in its unfathomable depths that gives rise to and accompanies the scientific journey.”

“Christ, who is the light of humankind and of the world, illuminates the path so that science may always be knowledge at the service of life,” he said. “When this light ceases and when knowledge is no longer in touch with life, it becomes sterile.”

He urged scientists to maintain a high regard for the sacredness of human life, “so that science is really at the service of humankind and not humankind at the service of science.”

It is thanks to scientific analysis, he said, that the church reaffirms “a just society recognizes the primacy of the right to life, from conception until its natural end.”

 

Comments Off on Pope Francis decries attacks on life — abortion, euthanasia, abandoning immigrants at sea, unsafe workplaces…
Marquee Powered By Know How Media.