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‘Love Saves Lives’ is the theme for 2018 March for Life

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WASHINGTON — The theme for the 45th annual March for Life will be “Love Saves Lives: Life Is the Loving, Empowering and Self-Sacrificial Option.”

The March for Life Education and Defense Fund announced the theme for the 2018 rally and march at a briefing on Capitol Hill Oct. 3 with Jeanne Mancini, president of the March for Life organization and other pro-life leaders in Washington. Read more »

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March for Life: ‘Renewed hope for change’

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For The Dialog

Eastern Shore Catholics at March for Life in Washington see possibility of legal abortion being ended

Vallie Otwell returned to the Jan. 27 March for Life in Washington for the first time in three decades, prompted by “a renewed hope for change.”

She also brought her daughter, Miranda, a senior at Easton High School who went to Ss. Peter and Paul Elementary School. “I want my kids to realize that there is hope.” Read more »

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Jubilant crowd gathers in Washington for annual March for Life

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Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON — Tens of thousands of pro-lifers filled the grounds near the Washington Monument and marched up Constitution Avenue to the U.S. Supreme Court Jan. 27 as both a protest of legalized abortion and a celebration of successful pro-life efforts across the country.

Students from the Diocese of Lansing, Mich., holds signs during the annual March for Life in Washington Jan. 27. (CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Catholic Standard)

Students from the Diocese of Lansing, Mich., holds signs during the annual March for Life in Washington Jan. 27. (CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Catholic Standard)

In years past, the March for Life, which takes place on or near Jan. 22 to mark the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973 decisions in Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton that legalized abortion virtually on demand, has been almost a battle cry for the uphill and constant fight faced by those in the pro-life movement hoping for more abortion restrictions and ultimately an end to abortion.

This year’s March for Life, under mostly sunny skies and 40-degree temperatures, was decidedly more upbeat, in part because one of the first speakers was Vice President Mike Pence: the first time a vice president attended the rally.  (See story below.)

Kellyanne Conway, special adviser to Trump, and the first on the speakers’ list to address the group, holding aloft placards but none of the usual giant banners, which were banned for security reasons, similarly got plenty of cheers when she said: “This is a new day, a new dawn for life.”

The scheduled presence of the vice president, only announced the day before, required the rally perimeter to be fenced in and the crowd to enter through long lines that had formed at security checks. Participants seemed unfazed by the required wait, taking it in stride with the day. Some pulled out their pre-packed lunches and started eating, others prayed the rosary. These marchers are used to hardships from weather conditions alone at the annual march.

Jeanne Mancini, president of March for Life, noted that the group has been marching in all types of bad weather over the years. She also pointed out that amid recent discussion about crowd size at events in Washington, it was hard to measure the number of people that day or for the total who have come out for the annual march over the past four decades. “The only number we care about is the 58 million” lost to abortion since it was legalized, she said.

As in years past, the crowd was primarily young, with a lot of high school and college-age groups. It was something the speakers took note of, saying this generation would not only keep the pro-life movement going but bring about changes.

Mary Ann Vann, a retiree who made the trip from Trussville, Alabama, for her sixth march, said the most exciting thing for her each time she has taken part is seeing the young people.

Vann, a parishioner at Holy Infant of Prague Parish in Trussville, said she hoped the energy at the march could be channeled into everyday support for the pro-life movement, something she is involved with on a regular basis with sidewalk counseling, volunteering at crisis pregnancy centers and helping young mothers with basic needs. She also said she is disheartened by hearing those who say pro-lifers are only concerned about babies because she and her fellow volunteers not only bring pregnant women to their doctor’s appointments but also help pay their medical costs.

Jim Klarsch, a member of St. Clement Parish in St. Louis, who came with a busload of eighth-graders, also is  involved with pro-life work with the Knights of Columbus at his parish. In Washington on his second march, he said the experience was “empowering.”

Standing alongside Constitution Avenue waiting for the march to begin, he said the crowd, which was already filling the street to each side and behind him as far as the eye could see, reinforced his feeling that “this is not just a day but a lifelong mission.”

“You’re part of a pilgrimage. You take that experience home and you live it,” he added.

Some noted that the march had a distinctly different tone than the Women’s March on Washington six days before. Two sisters who stood on the sidelines with some of the few handmade signs at the march, described themselves as feminists and said they found the pro-life march more positive and less angry.

“This is a message of love,” said Bridget Donofrio, from Washington, holding aloft a poster-board sign with words written with a black marker: “Respect all women born and unborn.”

Many of the march signs were pre-made placards with messages such as “I am pro abundant life” or “Defund Planned Parenthood” and “I am the pro-life generation.”

On the Metro, when two older women asked a young woman for directions and pointed to the group with signs that they wanted to join, the woman looked up from her phone and asked if there was a protest today.

“It’s the March for Life,” one woman said. A few seconds later she added: “It’s not a protest; it’s more of a celebration.”

     

Follow Zimmermann on Twitter: @carolmaczim.

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Cardinal Dolan: If sanctuary of the womb is violated, no one is safe

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Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON — Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan of New York warned that if the sanctuary of the womb is violated, then other sanctuaries are at risk.

“Can any of us be safe, can any of us claim a sanctuary anywhere when the first and most significant sanctuary of them all, the mother’s womb protecting a tiny life, can be raided and ravaged?” he asked in his homily during the Jan. 26 opening Mass for the National Prayer Vigil for Life at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. The vigil always precedes the annual March for Life, which takes place on the National Mall.

New York Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan, chairman of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Pro-Life Activities, waves as he arrives to concelebrate the opening Mass of the National Prayer Vigil for Life at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington Jan. 26. The all-night vigil is held before the annual March for Life, which this year marked the 44th anniversary of the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion across the nation. (CNS/Bob Roller)

New York Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan, chairman of the U.S. bishops’ Committee on Pro-Life Activities, waves as he arrives to concelebrate the opening Mass of the National Prayer Vigil for Life at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington Jan. 26. The all-night vigil is held before the annual March for Life, which this year marked the 44th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion across the nation. (CNS/Bob Roller)

Cardinal Dolan, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Pro-Life Activities, called the womb “a sanctuary which beckons us, where we are safe and secure in our mother’s tender yet strong embrace, where the Creator himself assures us of protection and life itself, a sanctuary God has designed for us to protect our lives now and in eternity.”

He summoned up a montage of sanctuaries throughout human history, including those used by the Israelites, the sanctuary of the temple in Jerusalem where Mary and Joseph took Jesus each year, the use of cathedrals and churches as sanctuaries from violence, and the United States, first as a sanctuary for the Pilgrims fleeing religious violence in England, later for Catholics with little to their name but “clinging within to that pearl of great price, their faith,” and today’s immigrants and refugees.

When life in the womb is threatened, “should it shock us” that “such a society would begin to treat the sanctuary of the earth’s environment as a toxic waste dump; would begin to consider homes and neighborhoods as dangerous instead of as sanctuaries where families are protected and fostered; would commence to approach the poor as bothersome instead of brothers?” Cardinal Dolan asked.

Shrine officials estimated that 12,000 attended the Jan. 26 Mass, which was shown on three cable channels and broadcast on two radio networks. Among the faithful were 545 seminarians, 90 deacons, 320 priests, 40 bishops and five cardinals in a 20-minute entrance procession.

The faithful were squeezed more tightly than usual as pews in the left transept were blocked off so work crews could continue work on the shrine’s Trinity Dome, which should be completed by next year’s March for Life. The blockage resulted in the loss of “several hundred” seats, according to shrine spokeswoman Jacqueline Hayes.

Auxiliary Bishop Barry R. Knestout of Washington received applause when he announced near the end of the Mass that the starting times for three pre-March for Life Masses elsewhere in Washington the next morning would be moved up an hour to allow for longer lines in security checkpoints at the pre-march rally, as among those speaking at it now included “senior White House officials and a special guest.” No name was mentioned, but earlier in the day it was announced Vice President Mike Pence would address the March for Life rally in person. After a lineup of speakers, rally participants then march from the National Mall to Constitution Avenue, then up the avenue to the Supreme Court.

The weather changed overnight from the low 50s at the start of the Jan. 26 Mass to a more typical near-freezing temperature with stiff winds before a Jan. 27 morning Mass at the shrine celebrated by Archbishop Gregory M. Aymond of New Orleans, USCCB secretary.

Archbishop Aymond’s homily sounded a similar theme to Cardinal Dolan’s in terms how acceptance of abortion is “used to justify” other disrespect for life at various stages, citing assisted suicide, euthanasia, the death penalty and the rejection of immigrants. Quoting from that day’s Gospel, Archbishop Aymond said, “Jesus says, ‘Let them come to me, let them come to me.’”

He received applause from a Mass attendance estimated at 3,500 when he cited the results of a recent study that showed “the abortion rate in the United States has hit a historic low since Roe v. Wade.” Archbishop Aymond said the study speculated on various reasons for the decline, but one was not mentioned.

That reason was “the witness of so many people for life,” he said. “Youth and young adults are strongly pro-life in our world and in our church,” he added to applause. “You are making a difference in the United States. You are changing our culture from a culture of death into a culture of life,” the archbishop said to more applause.

During the March for Life, and afterward in the marchers’ parishes and neighborhoods, Archbishop Aymond said, “we will continue to witness, and with God’s help, we will continue to be strong voices for the respect and the dignity of human life.”

 

Follow Pattison on Twitter: @MeMarkPattison.

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Vice President Pence will address March for Life rally in D.C. tomorrow

January 26th, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized Tags: , , , ,

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The White House has confirmed that Vice President Mike Pence will address tomorrow’s March for Life rally.

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence speaks to reporters Jan. 6 in New York. The White House has confirmed that Pence will address the Jan. 27 March for Life rally in Washington. (CNS photo/Mike Segar, Reuters)

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence speaks to reporters Jan. 6 in New York. The White House has confirmed that Pence will address the Jan. 27 March for Life rally in Washington. (CNS photo/Mike Segar, Reuters)

The rally is scheduled to begin at noon.

As a member of Congress, Pence addressed the March for Life in 2002, 2003 and 2007. Other speakers to address the rally include: New York Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan, chairman of the U.S. bishops’ pro-life committee; Kellyanne Conway, special adviser to President Donald J. Trump; Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa; Reps. Mia Love, R-Utah, and Chris Smith, R-New Jersey; and Baltimore Ravens tight end Benjamin Watson.

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Commentary — Marching for Life is not enough

January 26th, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized Tags: , ,

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What a sight! Over 25 times from the top of Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., I have seen a sea of people marching to proclaim the dignity of unborn human life, and how death-dealing abortion sends the unholy message that some human beings are disposable.

As I write, I am a just one day away from marching with and viewing that sea of people once again. It’s always a moral and spiritual shot-in-the-arm for me.

But good as they are, the Washington “March for Life” (Jan. 27), the “Walk for Life West Coast” (Jan. 21), the “Midwest March for Life” (Feb. 4) and dozens of similar events at state capitols throughout the U.S., they are not enough. Read more »

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Diocesan groups sponsoring trips to the 2017 March for Life

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Buses are leaving from parishes around the diocese for the annual March for Life, which will take place Jan. 27 in Washington, D.C. These were taken from parish bulletins.

• The Church of the Holy Child in Brandywine Hundred in Wilmington is sponsoring a bus. The cost is $30. The bus will depart by 7:15 a.m. and return at approximately 6:30 p.m. Contact Nancy Frick at (302) 529-5738 or nancyfrick93@verizon.net. Read more »

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Parishioners help stranded motorists on turnpike during blizzard

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Catholic News Service

HOLLIDAYSBURG, Pa. — It didn’t take long into 2016 for St. Thomas the Apostle Parish in Bedford to put into practice Pope Francis’ request for people to respond with compassion to those in need during the Year of Mercy.

At the start of snowstorm that pummeled much of the Northeast Jan. 22-23, Father Donald W. Dusza, pastor of St. Thomas, was probably wondering how many people might venture out to attend the scheduled 4 p.m. Mass that Saturday, Jan. 23.

Father Patrick Behm of Le Mars, Iowa, checks out his cellphone during Mass Jan. 23 at an altar constructed of snow alongside the Pennsylvania Turnpike. The group from the Diocese of Sioux City, Iowa, was returning home from the annual March for Life rally in Washington when Winter Storm Jonas consumed the East Coast.A parish in Bedford, Pa., helped stranded motorists on the Pa. Turnpike during the storm. See story.  (CNS photo/courtesy Carolyn Von Tersch)

Father Patrick Behm of Le Mars, Iowa, checks out his cellphone during Mass Jan. 23 at an altar constructed of snow alongside the Pennsylvania Turnpike. The group from the Diocese of Sioux City, Iowa, was returning home from the annual March for Life rally in Washington when Winter Storm Jonas consumed the East Coast.A parish in Bedford, Pa., helped stranded motorists on the Pa. Turnpike during the storm. See story. (CNS photo/courtesy Carolyn Von Tersch)

“I actually was heading to the church around 3:30 p.m. when I got a call from a group of travelers from the Sioux Falls Diocese of South Dakota looking for lodging,” he said. The group was returning home after attending the annual March for Life in Washington when they became stranded on the Pennsylvania Turnpike where a tractor-trailer had jackknifed and traffic had been at a standstill while the accident was cleared.

The priest said the group, mainly high-school and college-age students, was welcome to stay overnight in the school gym. He then immediately telephoned Railitsa Diehl, who is in charge of the school kitchen.

“She was a real trouper,” said Father Dusza in a telephone interview with The Catholic Register, newspaper of the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown. “She worked really hard, by herself, to get a pasta meal together for the weary young people,” who had spent the previous night in their buses.

“I can’t say enough about her effort, and the sacrifice she made by coming out in the middle of a storm. The students and their chaperones really appreciated her efforts.”

As the highways began to clear a bit the next night, Father Dusza received another request for shelter from more pro-life marchers on their way back to the Diocese of Lincoln, Nebraska. The group had been in touch with the South Dakota chaperones. So, that night, St. Thomas Parish hosted a big sleepover for about 160 pilgrims. Some of the travelers found blankets on their buses and they all slept on the gym floor.

Things became a little more hectic later that evening when Father Dusza received another call, this time from officials traveling with the Archdiocese of Omaha, Nebraska. “They said they were able to find shelter in the hotels around Bedford, but were looking for a place to celebrate Mass,” he said. The caravan was comprised of five buses with more than 300 people.

“I told them we just had a small church building that only accommodated about 250 people. Along with my parishioners, it would be beyond capacity.” Luckily, the group had two priests with them. Father Dusza told them they were welcome to celebrate Mass in the school gym, which they accepted.

By Sunday morning Jan. 24, most of the buses continued their return home.

Celebrating its bicentennial this year, St. Thomas the Apostle Parish is an official Jubilee Year of Mercy pilgrimage site for the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown, where the faithful may gain the jubilee year indulgence.

But for hundreds of weary travelers, that indulgence was expressed in a very practical way.

“It was an interesting weekend,” Father Dusza said with a laugh. Providing the stranded marchers with shelter was “easily done and we were certainly glad to help,” he added.

By Bruce A. Tomaselli

Tomaselli is manager of The Catholic Register, newspaper of the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown.

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Parishioners help stranded motorists on Pa. turnpike during blizzard

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Catholic News Service

HOLLIDAYSBURG, Pa. — It didn’t take long into 2016 for St. Thomas the Apostle Parish in Bedford to put into practice Pope Francis’ request for people to respond with compassion to those in need during the Year of Mercy.

At the start of snowstorm that pummeled much of the Northeast Jan. 22-23, Father Donald W. Dusza, pastor of St. Thomas, was probably wondering how many people might venture out to attend the scheduled 4 p.m. Mass that Saturday, Jan. 23.

“I actually was heading to the church around 3:30 p.m. when I got a call from a group of travelers from the Sioux Falls Diocese of South Dakota looking for lodging,” he said. The group was returning home after attending the annual March for Life in Washington when they became stranded on the Pennsylvania Turnpike where a tractor-trailer had jackknifed and traffic had been at a standstill while the accident was cleared.

The priest said the group, mainly high-school and college-age students, was welcome to stay overnight in the school gym. He then immediately telephoned Railitsa Diehl, who is in charge of the school kitchen.

“She was a real trouper,” said Father Dusza in a telephone interview with The Catholic Register, newspaper of the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown. “She worked really hard, by herself, to get a pasta meal together for the weary young people,” who had spent the previous night in their buses.

“I can’t say enough about her effort, and the sacrifice she made by coming out in the middle of a storm. The students and their chaperones really appreciated her efforts.”

As the highways began to clear a bit the next night, Father Dusza received another request for shelter from more pro-life marchers on their way back to the Diocese of Lincoln, Nebraska. The group had been in touch with the South Dakota chaperones. So, that night, St. Thomas Parish hosted a big sleepover for about 160 pilgrims. Some of the travelers found blankets on their buses and they all slept on the gym floor.

Things became a little more hectic later that evening when Father Dusza received another call, this time from officials traveling with the Archdiocese of Omaha, Nebraska. “They said they were able to find shelter in the hotels around Bedford, but were looking for a place to celebrate Mass,” he said. The caravan was comprised of five buses with more than 300 people.

“I told them we just had a small church building that only accommodated about 250 people. Along with my parishioners, it would be beyond capacity.” Luckily, the group had two priests with them. Father Dusza told them they were welcome to celebrate Mass in the school gym, which they accepted.

By Sunday morning Jan. 24, most of the buses continued their return home.

Celebrating its bicentennial this year, St. Thomas the Apostle Parish is an official Jubilee Year of Mercy pilgrimage site for the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown, where the faithful may gain the jubilee year indulgence.

But for hundreds of weary travelers, that indulgence was expressed in a very practical way.

“It was an interesting weekend,” Father Dusza said with a laugh. Providing the stranded marchers with shelter was “easily done and we were certainly glad to help,” he added.

By Bruce A. Tomaselli, manager of The Catholic Register, newspaper of the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown.

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March for Life marks 43rd anniversary of Roe decision legalizing abortion

January 26th, 2016 Posted in Featured, National News Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON — Catholic admonitions about inclusion mixed with strong political language before the March of Life got underway Jan. 22 in Washington.

Pro-life supporters walk in the snowfall up Constitution during the March for Life Jan. 22, the 43rd anniversary of the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion in U.S. The snowfall was the start of a two-day historic storm in the nation's capital. (CNS/Gregory L. Tracy, The Pilot)

Pro-life supporters walk in the snowfall up Constitution during the March for Life Jan. 22, the 43rd anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion in U.S. The snowfall was the start of a two-day historic storm in the nation’s capital. (CNS/Gregory L. Tracy, The Pilot)

At a Jesuit-sponsored Mass for life at St. Aloysius Gonzaga Church that morning, Father Paddy Gilger’s homily reminded a small group of students that because Jesus made an effort to be inclusive when he chose his disciples, they, too, should be respectful of others’ opinions.

“As we join in the fight against the scourge of abortion, our differences remain, and that’s OK,” he said.

Father Gilger also told the students to combine prayer and penance to create a culture of life. “Our efforts are to be able to create the same amount of space for people to change their hearts.”

Later, at the March for Life rally at the Washington Monument, attended by nearly 50,000, Carly Fiorina, the former CEO of Hewlett-Packard who is running for the Republican presidential nomination, stuck to her standard political stump speech.

She drew loud cheers with her claim, “You can bet that I will win this fight against Hillary Clinton.”

Fiorina reminded the audience that the next president “will have the awesome responsibility to pick up to four Supreme Court justices who will decide issues of life and religious liberty. … Make no mistake, ladies and gentleman, this election is a fight for the character of our nation.”

They grew quiet when Fiorina said the issue before them was “whether we, as a nation believe, as the Democrat platform says that a life isn’t a life until it leaves the hospital. Yes, that is the Democrat platform, that a life isn’t a life until it’s born. And they call us extreme. It is Democrats, the pro-abortion industry, that is extreme.”

Silent symbols of religious liberty, however, got a roar. A group of Little Sisters of the Poor who work at the order’s nursing home in Washington drew a sustained ovation when they were introduced.

The Denver-based order is fighting a mandate from the Department of Health and Human Services that requires employers, including most religious employers, to provide contraceptive coverage to its employees under the Affordable Health Care Act even if they have moral objections to doing so.

Their Supreme Court case,  Zubik v. Burwell, will be heard in March. The order is facing $70 million in fines per year if it does not comply.

In her remarks, Fiorina also expressed her continued support for the series of videos released last summer by David Daleiden and the Center for Medical Progress that purport to show California representatives of Planned Parenthood discussing the sale of parts of aborted fetuses.

A lawsuit against Daleiden and the center over the videos has reached the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, with the National Abortion Foundation and Planned Parenthood accusing him of misrepresenting his organization and illegally taping without permission, and aiding in violent threats against abortion clinics and the women who go there.

Planned Parenthood officials claim the videos were edited to manipulate the interviews and any mention of money for tissue and body parts is related to customary handling fees. But Daleiden and the Center for Medical Progress stand by its videos.

Patrick Kelly, the Knights of Columbus vice president for public policy, said opponents of the pro-life movement, “insist on dividing and bullying those who disagree with them by speaking of a fictional war on women. Our movement, the movement to protect human life, is different. It is built by you, the grass roots. … We come her to show that we cannot be intimidated.”

Rep. Chris Smith, R-New Jersey, co-chairman of the Congressional Pro-Life Caucus, praised efforts by state legislatures. “The gains have been historic — 282 pro-life laws have been enacted since 2010 including laws to stop dismemberment abortions, require a 72-hour waiting period, and informed consent.”

Smith, a Catholic, said the House override vote of President Barack Obama’s recent veto of a bill removing all federal funding from Planned Parenthood was scheduled for next week.

The rally was the evangelical community’s first formal involvement in the annual March for Life, which is held on the anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision, which legalized abortion virtually on demand in the U.S.

“We are grateful for your leadership on the culture of life,” said Jim Daly, president of Focus on the Family. “It’s taken us time to come to the party, but we are here with you!”

Daly also was headlining the first major pro-life conference for evangelicals to be held in conjunction with the March for Life. He was joined at the conference and the rally by Russell Moore, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention.

In the days leading up to the March for Life as forecasters announced the impending blizzard headed for Washington, organizers of the annual event said it would not be canceled.

It drew “what appeared to be tens of thousands” of participants, according to an estimate from Jeanne Monahan-Mancini, president of the March for Life Education and Defense Fund.

“The world may think that we’re a little bit crazy to be here on a day like today, but those that are standing here know that there is no sacrifice too great to fight the human rights abuse of abortion,” Monahan-Mancini told the crowd.

After the rally, participants marched up Constitution Avenue to the U.S. Supreme Court as snow began to fall, the beginning of what turned into a major blizzard and left more than 2 feet of snow in Washington, with outer suburbs receiving even more.

 

A related video can be viewed at https://youtu.be/z4t88lZ5jCA.

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