Home » Posts tagged 'Miami Archbishop Thomas G. Wenski'

Two U.S. bishops troubled by Trump’s pardon of Arpaio

By

Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON — It began with the retired archbishop of Los Angeles saying he was “troubled” and “disgusted” with President Donald Trump’s pardon of convicted former Arizona Sheriff Joseph Arpaio.

In an Aug. 28 blog, Cardinal Roger M. Mahony, retired archbishop of Los Angeles, bluntly addressed racial profiling that he said Latinos suffered at the hands of Arpaio, former sheriff of Maricopa County in Arizona. In late July, Arpaio was found in criminal contempt of court for failing to stop detaining people he “suspected” of being undocumented immigrants. Arpaio detractors say that meant stopping people with brown skin and that was his only criteria for determining suspicion.

Miami Archbishop Thomas G. Wenski has said if President Trump pardoned Arizona Sheriff Joseph Arpaio, Congress should pardon irregular immigrants by passing comprehensive immigration reform. .(CNS file photo)

One of those detained was Dan Magos, a U.S. citizen, who, along with his wife, was stopped for no reason and harassed by the sheriff in 2009 in Phoenix. With help from the American Civil Liberties Union, Magos filed a lawsuit against Arpaio, and ultimately the case wound up in court. Different judges warned Arpaio to stop his practices, but he nevertheless continued, placing him in contempt of court.

Cardinal Mahony said Arpaio’s tenure was marked by “harassment of our Latino brothers and sisters, and the disruption of immigrant communities. He created fear and terror among so many immigrants, and not just in Arizona. Children here in California were afraid to go to school because of what they heard from Phoenix.”

But President Trump saw things a different way and said via Twitter that the former sheriff was a “patriot” and “He kept Arizona safe.” On Aug. 25, he pardoned Arpaio, who has been identified by several news outlets as Catholic.

Cardinal Mahony said that Instead of upholding the law, the president’s pardon “flouts and undermines the rule of law. It also sends a dangerous signal to law enforcement throughout the country that they, too, can ignore due process and profile and harass persons of color, especially Latinos.”

“This pardon rekindles the fear and terror so rampant among our immigrant peoples. The police need good relationships with immigrants and our immigrants need an understanding and helpful police force to protect them,” he added.

The retired archbishop also called on “all Catholics and people of goodwill” to raise their voices “and stand up for our immigrant brothers and sisters during this difficult period in their lives and in the life of our country.”

On Aug. 28, Miami Archbishop Thomas G. Wenski also weighed in on Arpaio’s pardon via Twitter, saying that if the president pardoned the sheriff, then Congress should ‘“pardon’ irregular immigrants by passing comprehensive immigration reform.”

The next day, he told Jesuit-run America magazine: “What’s good for the goose is good for the gander,” meaning that if the sheriff broke the law and received a pardon, then the argument that undocumented criminals who broke the law should be punished, does not hold.

       

Follow Guidos on Twitter: @CNS_Rhina.

       

Comments Off on Two U.S. bishops troubled by Trump’s pardon of Arpaio

Bishops from around the world plead for climate change action

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — The presidents of the U.S. and Canadian bishops’ conferences joined leaders of the regional bishops’ conferences of Asia, Africa, Latin America, Oceania and Europe in signing an appeal for government leaders to reach a “fair, legally binding and truly transformational climate agreement” at a summit in Paris.

Indian Cardinal Oswald Gracias of Mumbai, president of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences, signed the appeal Oct. 26 at the beginning of a joint news conference at the Vatican.

A boathouse sits at the end of a small pier at Lake Ammersee in Germany Oct. 24. The presidents of the U.S. and Canadian bishops' conferences joined leaders of the regional bishops' conferences of Asia, Africa, Latin America, Oceania and Europe in signing an appeal for government leaders to reach a "fair, legally binding and truly transformational climate agreement" at a summit in Paris. (CNS photo/Karl-Josef Hildenbrand, EPA)

A boathouse sits at the end of a small pier at Lake Ammersee in Germany Oct. 24. The presidents of the U.S. and Canadian bishops’ conferences joined leaders of the regional bishops’ conferences of Asia, Africa, Latin America, Oceania and Europe in signing an appeal for government leaders to reach a “fair, legally binding and truly transformational climate agreement” at a summit in Paris. (CNS photo/Karl-Josef Hildenbrand, EPA)

The appeal, Cardinal Gracias said, was a response to Pope Francis’ letter on the environment and an expression of “the anxiety of all the people, all the churches all over the world” regarding how, “unless we are careful and prudent, we are heading for disaster.”

The appeal is addressed to negotiators preparing for the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Paris Nov. 30-Dec. 11. The bishops called for “courageous and imaginative political leadership” and for legal frameworks that “clearly establish boundaries and ensure the protection of the ecosystem.”

The bishops also asked governments to recognize the “ethical and moral dimensions of climate change,” to recognize that the climate and the atmosphere are common goods belonging to all, to set a strong limit on global temperature increase and to promote new models of development and lifestyles that are “climate compatible.”

The appeal calls for decisions that place people above profits, that involve the poor in decision making, that protect people’s access to water and to land, are particularly mindful of vulnerable communities and are specific in commitments to finance mitigation efforts.

Colombian Cardinal Ruben Salazar Gomez of Bogota, president of the Latin American bishops’ council, spoke of the “suffering” Amazon basin and the key role it plays in the survival of South America and the world. The Latin American bishops, he said, want an end to pollution, to the destruction of the forests and the disappearance of biodiversity, but they also want justice for their people, the majority of whom do not benefit from the exploitation of resources taken from their countries.

Archbishop John Ribat of Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, president of the Federation of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Oceania, told reporters, “We come from islands, and our life is very much at risk.”

“We belong to those most vulnerable groups impacted by rising sea levels,” he said. Many communities, particularly on Tuvalu, Kiribati and the Carteret Islands, already are experiencing the disappearance of land used for subsistence farming or seeing their agricultural land rendered unusable by the infiltration of salt water.

Climate change, the archbishop said, already is leading to the phenomenon of climate refugees.

The appeal said that most people, whether or not they believe in God, recognize the planet as “a shared inheritance, who(se) fruits are meant to benefit everyone. For believers, this becomes a question of fidelity to the creator, since God created the world for everyone.”

Miami Archbishop Thomas G. Wenski, chairman of the U.S. bishops’ Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, confirmed that the U.S. bishops asked that a specific temperature target not be in the appeal. Others agreed, he said.

“We’re pastors and we’re not scientists,” the archbishop said. The specific temperature target for reversing the impact of climate change is something for scientists to decide, but the need to act is a moral issue, and the bishops are competent to speak to that, he said.

People in the United States are starting to understand how important action is, Archbishop Wenski said. It has been slow because “we live in a little bit of a cocoon sometimes, and if it doesn’t affect us immediately, we don’t react.”

Archbishop Richard Smith of Edmonton, Alberta, represented the Canadian bishops at the presentation. His province, Alberta, is “fossil fuel central,” he said, yet people in Alberta, like in the rest of Canada, recognize that something must be done.

“Nobody wants the future placed in jeopardy because of this, and everyone understands intergenerational responsibility,” he said.

“Everybody knows that we have to move away from fossil fuels,” he said, but the big question is how. “There are some great minds out there working on finding the new technologies” that will provide jobs and energy without harming the environment.

Comments Off on Bishops from around the world plead for climate change action

Labor Day 2014 — U.S. bishops lament young adults’ high unemployment rate

By

WASHINGTON — In their 2014 Labor Day statement, the U.S. bishops denounced the fact young adults have “borne the brunt” of unemployment and underemployment in this country and around the world.

“Our younger generations are counting on us to leave them a world better than the one we inherited,” wrote Miami Archbishop Thomas G. Wenski, chairman of the U.S. bishops’ Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development.

Writing the statement on behalf of the bishops for Labor Day, which is Sept. 1, the archbishop spoke of Pope Francis’ teaching against an “economy of exclusion” and applied it to the millions of unemployed young adults in the United States. Read more »

Comments Off on Labor Day 2014 — U.S. bishops lament young adults’ high unemployment rate
Marquee Powered By Know How Media.