Home » Posts tagged 'papal audience'

At Mass, Jesus seeks to bring others with him to salvation, pope says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — If people really understood that participating at Mass is witnessing Christ’s suffering, death and resurrection, then maybe they would stop taking pictures, talking, making comments and acting as if it were some kind of show, Pope Francis said.

“This is Mass: to enter into Jesus’ passion, death, resurrection and ascension. When we go to Mass, it is as if we were going to Calvary, it’s the same,” the pope said Nov. 22 during his weekly general audience. Read more »

Comments Off on At Mass, Jesus seeks to bring others with him to salvation, pope says

Mass is a time of silence and prayer, not idle chitchat, pope says

By

Catholic News Service

 

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Mass is the highest form of prayer and not an appropriate moment for small talk, Pope Francis said.

At church, Catholics should spend their time in silence before Mass, preparing “to meet with Jesus” instead of engaging in “chitchat,” the pope said Nov. 15 during his weekly general audience.

“Silence is so important,” he said. “Remember what I told you last time: we are not going to a show. Silence prepares us and accompanies us.” Read more »

Comments Off on Mass is a time of silence and prayer, not idle chitchat, pope says

Christians aren’t ‘whiny and angry,’ they find hope in the Resurrection, pope says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Real hope lies in the proclamation of Jesus’ death and resurrection, not just with one’s words but also in deeds, Pope Francis said.

Christians are called to be witnesses of the resurrection through “their way of welcoming, smiling and loving” instead of just “repeating memorized lines,” the pope said Oct. 4 during his weekly general audience. Read more »

Comments Off on Christians aren’t ‘whiny and angry,’ they find hope in the Resurrection, pope says

Greed corrupts beauty of God’s creation, pope says at audience

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Humanity’s greed and selfishness can turn creation into a sad and desolate world instead of the sign of God’s love that it was meant to be, Pope Francis said.

U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, the Democratic nominee for U.S. vice president in the 2016 election, talks with Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan of New York during Pope Francis' general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Feb. 22. (CNS/Paul Haring)

U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, the Democratic nominee for U.S. vice president in the 2016 election, talks with Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan of New York during Pope Francis’ general audience in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican Feb. 22. (CNS/Paul Haring)

Human beings are often tempted to view creation as “a possession we can exploit as we please and for which we do not have to answer to anyone,” the pope said Feb. 22 at his weekly general audience.

“When carried away by selfishness, human beings end up ruining even the most beautiful things that have been entrusted to them,” the pope said.

As an early sign of spring, the audience was held in St. Peter’s Square for the first time since November. Despite the chilly morning temperatures, the pope made the rounds in his popemobile, greeting pilgrims and kissing bundled-up infants.

Continuing his series of talks on Christian hope, the pope reflected on St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans, which expresses the hope “that creation itself would be set free from slavery to corruption.”

St. Paul, the pope said, reminds Christians that creation is a “marvelous gift that God has placed in our hands.”

Through this gift, he said, “we can enter into a relationship with him and recognize the imprint of his loving plan, which we are all called to achieve together.”

Sin, however, breaks communion not only with God but with his creation, “thus making it a slave, submissive to our frailty,” the pope said.  

“Think about water. Water is a beautiful thing; it is so important. Water gives us life and it helps us in everything. But when minerals are exploited, water is contaminated and creation is destroyed and dirtied. This is just one example; there are many,” he said, departing from his prepared remarks.

When people break their relationship with creation, they not only lose their original beauty, he said, but they also “disfigure everything surrounding them,” causing a reminder of God’s love to become a bleak sign of pride and greed.

St. Paul tells believers that hope comes from knowing that God in his mercy wants to heal the “wounded and humbled hearts” of all men and women and, through them, “regenerate a new world and a new humanity, reconciled in his love,” Pope Francis said.

“The Holy Spirit sees beyond the negative appearances for us and reveals to us the new heavens and the new earth that the Lord is preparing for humanity,” the pope said.

“This is the content of our hope. A Christian does not live outside of the world; he knows how to recognize the signs of evil, selfishness and sin in his own life and in what surrounds him,” he said. “But at the same time, a Christian has learned to read all of this with the eyes of Easter, with the eyes of the risen Christ.”

 

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

Comments Off on Greed corrupts beauty of God’s creation, pope says at audience

God’s gift of mercy must be shared with others, pope says

By

 

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — God’s mercy is infectious and must be shared with others, Pope Francis said.

Mercy is “a journey that departs from the heart to arrive at the hands,” the pope said Aug. 10 at his weekly general audience.

Pope Francis greets the faithful as he arrives to lead his general audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Aug. 10. (CNS photo/Max Rossi, Reuters)

Pope Francis greets the faithful as he arrives to lead his general audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Aug. 10. (CNS photo/Max Rossi, Reuters)

In his main audience talk, Pope Francis focused on the Gospel story of Jesus raising from the dead the son of the widow of Nain, giving renewed hope not just to the woman and her son, but to all.

“The powerful word of Jesus can make us rise again and takes us, too, from death to life,” the pope said. “His word revives us, gives hope, refreshes weary hearts and opens us to a vision of the world and of life that goes beyond suffering and death.”

Pope Francis ended his main talk by insisting that “Jesus watches you, heals you with his mercy and says, ‘Arise,’ and your heart is new.”

“And what do I do now with this new heart healed by Jesus?” he asked. “I do the works of mercy with my hands and I try to help, to heal the many who are in need. Mercy is a journey that departs from the heart and arrives at the hands, at the works of mercy.”

Greeting Italian visitors at the end of the audience, the pope returned to his point about how the experience of mercy must lead Christians to concrete acts of mercy toward others.

Recently, he said, a bishop told him that in his cathedral, there is not just one Holy Door designated for the Year of Mercy, but two.

One Holy Door is an entrance, the doorway people pass through to ask for God’s forgiveness and receive it in the sacraments. The other door is an exit, “to go out and bring God’s mercy to others with the works of mercy. This bishop is intelligent, isn’t he?” the pope said.

“In our hearts we receive the mercy of Jesus, who gives us pardon because God forgives everything, everything,” the pope said. “He raises us up. He gives us new life and he also infects us with his compassion. From our hearts forgiven and healed, and with the compassion of Jesus, the journey toward our hands begins, that it, toward the works of mercy.”

 

Follow Wooden on Twitter @Cindy_Wooden

Comments Off on God’s gift of mercy must be shared with others, pope says

World at war needs signs of brotherhood, friendship, pope says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — In a world traumatized by war, young people gathered for World Youth Day in Krakow, Poland, gave strong signs of hope and brotherhood, Pope Francis said.

Pope Francis greets a bride during his general audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Aug. 3.  (CNS photo/Max Rossi, Reuters)

Pope Francis greets a bride during his general audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Aug. 3. (CNS photo/Max Rossi, Reuters)

World Youth Day was a “prophetic sign for Poland and Europe” and took on a “global dimension” in a world threatened by a war fought in pieces, the pope said Aug. 3 at his weekly general audience.

“Precisely in this world at war, we need brotherhood, we need closeness, we need dialogue, and we need friendship. And this is the sign of hope: when there is brotherhood,” he said.

The pope entered the Paul VI audience hall greeted by thousands of pilgrims reaching out to him, asking him to bless their religious articles, kiss their babies or receive their gifts. But one gift stopped the pope in his tracks: a pope doll.

Pope Francis pointed to the doll and to himself, not completely convinced of the similarity, and then laughed, thanking the pilgrim for her present.

Before taking his place on the stage, the pope greeted Rabbi Alejandro Avruj, an old friend from Argentina seated in the front row. Also present were bishops and pilgrims from Panama, the country Pope Francis announced would host World Youth Day 2019.

In addition, a group of 65 young refugees from Eritrea and Syria came to see the pope. According to the Vatican, the children are from the Center for Asylum Seekers at Castelnuovo di Porto, about 15 miles north of Rome. The pope greeted them and posed for a group photo after the audience.

In his main audience talk, Pope Francis reflected on his visit to Krakow July 27-31 to join hundreds of thousands of young people from across the globe who met to celebrate their faith and who answered the call to “go forth together, to build bridges of brotherhood,” he said.

“They also came with their wounds, with their questions but, above all, with the joy of meeting each other,” the pope said.

Despite language barriers, he said, the youths were able to understand each other, creating a “mosaic of brotherhood” that is “emblematic of World Youth Day.”

Recalling his visit to the Auschwitz-Birkenau Nazi death camp, the pope said the great silence there “was more eloquent than any spoken word.”

“In that silence I heard, I felt the presence of all the souls that have passed there; I felt the compassion, the mercy of God that several holy souls brought there to that great abyss,” Pope Francis said. “In that great silence, I prayed for all the victims of violence and war.”

At Auschwitz, he said, he learned the “value of memory” not only as a remembrance of past tragedies, but also as a warning and call to responsibility today “so that the seed of hate and violence does not take root in the furrows of history.”

“Looking at that cruelty, at that concentration camp, I immediately thought of today’s cruelty, which is very similar. Not as concentrated as in that place, but around the world. This world that is sick with cruelty, pain, war, hate and sadness. And for this I ask you to pray so that the Lord may give us peace,” he said.

 

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

Comments Off on World at war needs signs of brotherhood, friendship, pope says

Church and society must learn from families, pope says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Society and the church have much to learn from the family and, in fact, the bond between the church and the family is “indissoluble,” Pope Francis said.

Pope Francis greets a baby during his general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Oct. 7. The pope said that when families mirror God's love for all, they teach the church how it should relate to all people. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Pope Francis greets a baby during his general audience in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican Oct. 7. The pope said that when families mirror God’s love for all, they teach the church how it should relate to all people. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Families bring needed values and a humanizing spirit to society and, when they mirror God’s love for all, they teach the church how it should relate to all people, including the “imperfect,” the pope said Oct. 7 during his weekly general audience.

While members of the Synod of Bishops on the family were meeting in small groups, Pope Francis held his audience with an estimated 30,000 people in St. Peter’s Square. He asked them to accompany the synod with their prayers.

While the Catholic Church insists that governments and the economy need families and have an obligation to give them greater support, Pope Francis said, the church itself recognizes that it, too, must have a “family spirit.”

Using the Gospel story of Jesus telling the disciples he would make them fishers of men, Pope Francis said, “a new kind of net is needed for this. We can say that today families are the most important net for the mission of Peter and the church.”

“It is not a net that imprisons,” he said. “On the contrary, it frees people from the polluted waters of abandonment and indifference that drown many human beings in the sea of solitude.”

Families are the place where individuals learn that they are “sons and daughters, not slaves or foreigners or just a number on an identity card,” the pope said. “The church must be the family of God.”

Pope Francis asked people to join him in praying that “the enthusiasm of the synod fathers, animated by the Holy Spirit, would energize the impulse of the church to abandon its old nets and start fishing again, trusting in the word of its Lord. Let us pray intensely for this.”

“Christ promised, and this comforts us, that even bad fathers do not refuse to give bread to their hungry children, so it is impossible that God would not give the Spirit to those who, even imperfect as they are, ask with passionate insistence,” he said.

The world itself needs “a robust injection of family spirit,” he said. Even the best organized economic, juridical and professional relationships are “dehydrated” and anonymous without concern for people, especially for the weakest members of society.

Family ties, the pope said, teach individuals and society the value of “bonds of fidelity, sincerity, trust, cooperation, respect; they encourage people to work toward a world that is livable and to believe in relationships even in difficult situations; they teach people to honor their word.”

Comments Off on Church and society must learn from families, pope says
Marquee Powered By Know How Media.