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‘Professor Marston and the Wonder Women’ is no comic book

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Catholic News Service

Fans of the comic book superheroine Wonder Woman (and of the recent film) are advised to steer well clear of “Professor Marston and the Wonder Women.”

Bella Heathcote stars in a scene from the movie “Professor Marston and the Wonder Women.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. .(CNS photo/Annapurna Pictures)

The sheer escapist pleasure of watching the wholesome feminist icon fight for truth and justice is downright spoiled on learning the sordid story of the comic’s creator, William Moulton Marston (1893-1947).

In this case, the truth hurts, and not simply because Marston (Luke Evans) liked to tie women up and paddle them. In addition to sadomasochism, he was a proponent of so-called free love and open marriage. Or, in Hollywood parlance, he was “ahead of his time.”

At Radcliffe College in the late 1920s, the hunky professor teaches behavioral psychology to his eager female students. Marston purports that all human behavior can be traced to the interplay of four emotional states: dominance, inducement, submission, and compliance.

It’s not hard to see where all this will lead. “People are happiest when they submit to a loving authority,” Marston insists.

By his side is his wife and research partner, Elizabeth (Rebecca Hall). Together they invent a lie detecting machine, which offers multiple opportunities to ask awkward questions (and inspires Wonder Woman’s “lasso of truth”).

Open-minded Elizabeth tolerates her husband’s roving eye. “I’m your wife, not your jailer,” she says.

The door thus opened, in marches one of Marston’s students, the gorgeous Olive (Bella Heathcote), who volunteers as a research assistant. Marston is instantly smitten. But Olive, in a surprising twist, only has eyes for Elizabeth, at least initially.

What ensues is a love triangle devoid of all propriety. The trio moves in together, engages promiscuously and, as the years pass, multiple babies are born.

It’s only a matter of time before neighborhood whispers are confirmed, and Marston is fired. To earn a living (and support all those children), he turns to writing.

“I’m going to inject my ideas right into the thumping heart of America,” Marston boasts.

Viewers will be disappointed to learn that the inspiration for Wonder Woman comes from Marston’s visit to a seedy Manhattan sex shop filled with tight costumes, ropes and cuffs.

Indeed, the early years of the Wonder Woman comic (which began in 1941) raised eyebrows for its extreme violence, bondage episodes and an acceptance of “free love” and homosexual behavior. Amid calls for the comic to be banned, Marston is hauled before a tribunal headed by moral gatekeeper Josette Frank (Connie Britton), director of the Child Study Association of America.

He has some explaining to do, as does writer-director Angela Robinson, who eagerly hoists the banner of relativism, painting a sympathetic picture of the outrageous Marston triad and casting traditional morality to the winds.

So much for being lassoed by the truth.

The film contains a negative view of religion, strong sexual content with nudity, a benign view of aberrant behavior, pornography and birth control, sexual banter, frequent rough language and one profane oath. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R, restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

 

McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.

 

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‘Friend Request’ is second-rate horror flick for Facebook users

September 25th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

Lots of blood and little sense characterize the second-rate horror flick “Friend Request.”

Alycia Debnam-Carey and Liesl Ahlers star in a scene from the movie “Friend Request.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. .(CNS photo/Entertainment Studios Motion Pictures)

Though director and co-writer Simon Verhoeven’s routine creeper includes a few genuinely jumpy moments, it fails to establish any grounding in logic. The film also becomes ever gorier as it unspools.

In a bid to frighten Facebook users, the plot has popular psych major Laura (Alycia Debnam-Carey) briefly befriend isolated fellow student Marina (Liesl Ahlers) both online and in person. When odd duck Marina behaves too strangely and gets too clingy, though, Laura dumps her, only to be shaken to learn, shortly afterward, that Marina has killed herself.

End of story? Well, not quite.

Death, it turns out, fails to stop occult-loving Marina. Wreaking revenge from beyond the grave, she targets her erstwhile buddy’s circle of closest pals, including BFF Olivia (Brit Morgan), tech guru Kobe (Connor Paolo), party boy Gustavo (Sean Marquette) and hefty, good-hearted Isabel (Brooke Markham).

Marina also manages to endanger Tyler (William Moseley), the aspiring coroner with whom Laura sometimes cohabits. (If that sounds like a somewhat random career for Verhoeven and his screenplay partners Matthew Ballen and Philip Koch to assign to the young man, bear in mind that having a character with easy access to the morgue can come in handy in this type of movie.)

As her besties drop like flies, Laura also has to grapple with the fact that Marina has taken control of her Facebook account and the folks at Facebook are powerless to help! What are the stabbings, gunshots and defenestration Laura’s unfortunate confidants are facing compared to the horror of that?

The film contains excessive bloody violence, a suicide theme, a premarital situation, some gruesome images, several uses of profanity, occasional rough language and a few crude terms. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R.

     

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

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‘Kingsman: The Golden Circle’ dressed in unsuitable, gruesome style

September 21st, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

Stylish but wayward, director and co-writer Matthew Vaughn’s action sequel “Kingsman: The Golden Circle” spoils its own fun by refusing all hint of restraint.

Channing Tatum and Halle Berry star in a scene from the movie “Kingsman: The Golden Circle.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS/Fox)

This leads to cartoonish but gruesome mayhem as well as a distasteful bedroom sequence that, together with other over-the-top elements, push the proceedings beyond the boundaries of acceptability.

In following up on his 2015 feature, “Kingsman: The Secret Service,” Vaughn and his returning script collaborator Jane Goldman once again focus on Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Taron Egerton), the working-class London lad whose transformation into a skilled espionage operative was charted in the original.

Now an established agent of the independent Kingsman service, Eggsy takes on Poppy Adams (Julianne Moore), a psychopathic international drug trafficker intent on blackmailing the U.S. government into legalizing all narcotics. Early scenes find Eggsy and Merlin (Mark Strong), the group’s tech guru, staggered by Poppy’s murderous assault on their headquarters and on the homes of some of their colleagues.

Following an emergency protocol, the duo discovers the existence of the Kentucky-based American counterpart of their organization, and travels to bluegrass country seeking assistance.

Where the Kingsman, as viewers of the first movie will know, use the eponymous Saville Row tailor shop as a front their operation, their cousins across the water conceal themselves behind the Statesman whiskey distillery. And, just as Kingsman agents use figures from Arthurian legend for their codenames, Statesman spies, including their leader, Champagne (Jeff Bridges), get their monikers from a variety of beverages.

With Champagne’s aid, as well as that of his subordinates, Tequila (Channing Tatum), Ginger Ale (Halle Berry) and Whiskey (Pedro Pascal), Eggsy battles to bring down both Poppy and Charlie Hesketh (Edward Holcroft), a rejected Kingsman applicant who’s backing her.

Continuing to work from a comic book series by Matt Millar and Dave Gibbons, Vaughn edges Eggsy toward a more committed relationship with his live-in girlfriend, Tilde (Hanna Alstrom), a Swedish princess he rescued from peril in the first outing. And the screenplay dwells on Eggsy’s ties to his mentor, Harry Hart (Colin Firth), aka Agent Galahad.

Yet, to cite just one instance of the movie’s excesses, the audience watches as characters are fed into a meat grinder. There’s no helping that kind of hamburger.

The film contains persistent, sometimes shocking, bloody violence, a scene of cannibalism, a drug theme, cohabitation, frivolously portrayed casual sex, some sexual humor, a couple of uses of profanity as well as pervasive rough and much crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R.

     

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

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‘Atomic Blonde’ — sadistic, degrading and tedious

July 27th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

Aspiring to be edgy and stylish, the espionage thriller “Atomic Blonde,” matches sometimes sadistic brawling with exploitative scenes of aberrant sex. The result is not only degraded but tedious as well.

Charlize Theron stars in a scene from the movie "Atomic Blonde." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive. (CNS)

Charlize Theron stars in a scene from the movie “Atomic Blonde.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS)

In the weeks leading up to the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, British operative Lorraine Broughton (Charlize Theron) is dispatched to the still-divided city. Her mission is to retrieve a vital dossier containing the identity of every Western agent active in the metropolis.

Broughton gets unreliable help form the jaded station chief, David Percival (James McAvoy). Percival, viewers are led to suspect, may be the mole whose double dealing the elusive file would reveal along with its other secrets.

Broughton receives less expected but more dependable aid from novice French spy Delphine Lasalle (Sofia Boutella). Rather rapidly, the two women wind up in bed together in more ways than one.

Told in flashbacks during a debriefing in which CIA officer Emmett Kurzfeld (John Goodman) joins Broughton’s superiors, Eric Gray (Toby Jones) and Chief “C” (James Faulkner) as she tells her tale, the plot of director David Leitch’s film is as convoluted as its tacky appeal to its audience’s lowest instincts is straightforward.

When she’s not groping Lasalle, Broughton grapples with enemies from the Stasi and the KGB, finding creative ways to eliminate them such as plunging a corkscrew into the esophagus of one opponent. Percival, for his part, prefers a handy ice pick to the forehead. He also does Broughton one better by waking up in one scene with a duo of dames bookending him.

Tough on the men and tender with her lady, Broughton, whose adventures are adapted from the 2012 graphic novel series “The Coldest City,” embodies a pornographic adolescent fantasy anyone committed to a Christian view of human dignity should shun.

The film contains nasty violence with much gore, graphic lesbian sexual activity, implied group sex, upper female and rear nudity, a blasphemous joke, a mild oath as well as pervasive rough and some crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R, restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

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‘The House’ is for losers

July 7th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

Had “The House” been made as a taut, dark comedy about the price of greed, it might have some merit. Instead, director Andrew Jay Cohen, who co-wrote the screenplay with Brendan O’Brien, has produced a sloppy, illogical, cringe-inducing time-waster.

Will Ferrell, Amy Poehler and Jason Mantzoukas star in a scene from the movie "The House." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive. (CNS photo/Warner Bros.)

Will Ferrell, Amy Poehler and Jason Mantzoukas star in a scene from the movie “The House.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS photo/Warner Bros.)

Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler as Scott and Kate Johansen are demonstrably stupid about the basics of financial security. But they are aware they’re in over their heads with debt. “We played by the rules and this is where it got us,” Scott complains bitterly.

Everyone’s happy when daughter Alex (Ryan Simpkins) is accepted at Bucknell University. But they were counting on a free-ride scholarship offered by their town, and the town council decides to build an elaborate community pool instead.

The couple’s solution is to go into partnership with their friend Frank (Jason Mantzoukas) to open a gambling den in his home. Frank’s trying to avoid foreclosure and get back with his wife, Raina (Michaela Watkins), who has been asking for a divorce.

Since the gambling house always wins, they figure that this is a foolproof scheme. What they don’t realize, of course, is that they’re complete fools, and that all such criminal enterprises eventually face justice.

Chaos descends quickly, with Frank putting the casino into heavy debt with high-end amenities, and the jollity comes to an abrupt end when Scott, threatening an accused cheater, unintentionally chops off his finger with a hatchet.

Light on the yucks but heavy on the yuk, “The House” becomes an onerous trial of the viewer’s attention span.

The film contains a lengthy gory sequence and frequent rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R.

 

Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.

 

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‘All Eyez on Me’ insightful but offensive

June 19th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

Radical politics and the wayward values of hip-hop culture take “All Eyez on Me,” a sometimes intense but overlong and rarely insightful biography of rapper Tupac Shakur (Demetrius Shipp Jr.), off course.

Demetrius Shipp Jr. and Kat Graham star in a scene from the movie "All Eyez on Me." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive.  (CNS photo/Codeblack Films)

Demetrius Shipp Jr. and Kat Graham star in a scene from the movie “All Eyez on Me.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS photo/Codeblack Films)

Add to these elements a script so laden with obscenities that hardly a sentence of dialogue passes without a visit to the verbal gutter, and the film becomes endorsable for none.

Born into a family of Black Panther activists, Danai Gurira turns in a powerful performance as his mother, Afeni, the future singer and actor confronts the challenges of an inner-city childhood before gaining stardom. Afeni trains him to react to these circumstances partly by educating himself (he eventually becomes a Shakespeare aficionado) but also, more troublingly, through a revolutionary attitude apparently accepting of violence.

Beginning with these early scenes, the script, written by Jeremy Haft, Eddie Gonzalez and Steven Bagatourian, shows a lack of balance both in its wholesale sympathy for the Panthers and in its entirely negative portrayal of the police. It later depicts former Vice President Dan Quayle as a villain and a dunce for questioning the anti-law enforcement tenor of some of Shakur’s lyrics.

Structured around an interview with a fictional, and unnamed, journalist (Hill Harper) during a real stint in prison, the retrospective takes in Shakur’s lifelong friendship with Jada Pinkett (Kat Graham), his partnership with rage-prone producer Suge Knight (Dominic Santana) and his romance with Quincy Jones’ daughter, Kidada (Annie Ilonzeh).

Before achieving a more or less stable relationship with Kidada, albeit one that involves living together before marriage, Shakur is shown partaking in the decadent lifestyle often associated with celebrity. This includes group and casual sex as well as deviant acts. Although a minor character calls Shakur out on this behavior, overall, the movie’s tone is one of implicit acceptance.

Where narcotics are concerned, “All Eyez” adopts an ambivalent outlook. While Afeni struggles with addiction and Shakur himself consistently refuses hard drugs, smoking marijuana is presented as essentially harmless.

Rampant materialism, exemplified by bling jewelry and private jets, also plays a role in setting director Benny Boom’s dramatization at odds with faith-based values. While viewers will hardly begrudge the once impoverished Shakur the financial success he earned, the need to wear more than one gold Rolex watch at a time can be questioned.

In fact, rivalry for expensive trinkets may have played a role in the tragic end of Shakur’s story, his still unsolved murder on the streets of Las Vegas 21 years ago. As a postscript to the picture points out, Shakur’s brief life, he died aged 25, was at least as much marked by creativity as by controversy. But if there are lessons to be learned from it, they are not to be found in “All Eyez on Me.”

The film contains some violence and gore, strong sexual content, including aberrant behavior, cohabitation and rear and upper female nudity, drug use, about a dozen profanities and relentless rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R.

 

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

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‘Rough Night’ is dead on arrival

June 15th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

“Weekend at Bernie’s” meets “Bridesmaids” in the raunchy comedy “Rough Night.” The result is pure dreck.

Political candidate and bride-to-be Jess Thayer (Scarlett Johansson) joins her four best friends — Aussie ditz Pippa (Kate McKinnon), overeager misfit Alice (Jillian Bell), social justice warrior Frankie (Ilana Glazer) and self-satisfied rich lady Blair (Zoe Kravitz) — for a wild bachelorette weekend in Miami.

Zoe Kravitz, Jillian Bell, Scarlett Johansson, Kate McKinnon, and Illana Grazer star in a scene from the movie "Rough Night." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive. .(CNS photo/Sony)

Zoe Kravitz, Jillian Bell, Scarlett Johansson, Kate McKinnon, and Illana Grazer star in a scene from the movie “Rough Night.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. .(CNS photo/Sony)

After doing shots and snorting cocaine, they summon a stripper (Ryan Cooper) to the house they’ve been loaned. But the fun comes to a screeching halt when Alice, who could afford to go on a diet, accidentally kills burlesque boy by impulsively jumping into his lap, overturning his chair and smashing the back of his head into the corner of a stone hearth.

As the quintet scrambles to hide the evidence, fearing, for barely tenable reasons, that the police will not believe their story, director and co-writer Lucia Aniello’s film runs the gamut of smut. Early on, the script (on which Aniello collaborated with Paul W. Downs, who also plays Jess’ nice-guy fiance, Peter) winsomely tips us off to the fact that, back in college, Frankie and Blair were lovers.

Later the screenplay introduces us to Lea and Pietro (Demi Moore and Ty Burrell), the randy swingers who live next door. Plot developments find Blair forced into an encounter with this duo while Peter, who knows that Jess is in some kind of trouble, dons diapers and chugs Red Bull for a marathon drive to Florida to save the day.

Along the way to the supposedly friendship-affirming conclusion, such inherently hilarious subjects as contraception, venereal disease and personal hygiene are milked for laughs. And, as Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman discovered all those years ago in the first movie referred to above, there’s really no sight gag funnier than propping up a corpse.

The film contains strong sexual content, including aberrant behavior, nudity and a benign view of homosexual acts, cohabitation, drug use, some gory images, constant vulgar humor, several uses of profanity and pervasive rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R, restricted

 

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

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‘Baywatch’ draws audience into polluted shallows

May 25th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

Eye candy and escapism were the draw of the television series from which director Seth Gordon’s action comedy “Baywatch” has been adapted.

Dwayne Johnson and Zac Efron star in a scene from the movie "Baywatch." The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. (CNS/Paramount)

Dwayne Johnson and Zac Efron star in a scene from the movie “Baywatch.” The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. (CNS/Paramount)

Whatever success the show, which began on NBC but had a longer life in syndication, may have had back in the 1990s, it takes more than an ensemble of good-looking people running around in bathing suits to sustain a feature film.

And, since neither Gordon nor screenwriters Damian Shannon and Mark Swift can seem to decide whether they’re out to make a pop-culture spoof or a crime-solving adventure, their film turns out to be a predictably shallow mess.

Matters are not helped by the absurdly earnest tone in which the conflict at the center of the plot is put forward to the audience. This clash pits newcomer Matt Brody (Zac Efron) against Mitch Buchannon (Dwayne Johnson), the longtime leader of the lifeguarding team of the title.

A disgraced Olympic swimmer whose selfish ways and fondness for partying cost his team a medal, Matt bucks against Mitch’s ethos of cooperation and mutual concern. As the dialogue heavy-handedly seeks to drive home, however, lives could be endangered if Matt doesn’t learn to collaborate with his new colleagues.

Like the group’s sober-toned effort to foil scheming real-estate developer and possible drug dealer Victoria Leeds (Priyanka Chopra), talk about the potentially fatal consequences of Matt’s ego-driven mistakes rings hollow when interspersed with lingering views of barely clad bodies.

The serious sleuthing also jars against the surfeit of low-minded humor in “Baywatch,” much of which displays a preoccupation with male characters’ crotches. This misguided motif reaches a low point with a prolonged sight gag involving the private parts of a cadaver. While the movie’s self-conscious flesh peddling is mostly just tiresome, this effort to reap gross-out giggles from less appealing anatomy registers as degrading.

The film contains some gunplay and physical violence with momentary but extreme gore, strong sexual content, including full nudity and off-screen nonmarital activity, several profanities and a few milder oaths as well as pervasive crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R.

 

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

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Avoid the ‘CHIPS’

March 24th, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

Get your motor running, spring yourself from a cage out on Highway 9, do whatever it takes to get away from the mind-numbing, motorcycle-bedecked comedy “CHIPS.”

Dax Shepard and Michael Pena star in a scene from the movie "Chips." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive. (CNS/Warner Bros.)

Dax Shepard and Michael Pena star in a scene from the movie “Chips.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS/Warner Bros.)

The humor in this twist on the 1977-1983 NBC-TV drama series quickly skids off the road and into the gutter, where it remains.

Dax Shepard, who also wrote and directed, plays rookie California Highway Patrol officer Jon Baker while Michael Pena portrays Jon’s first partner, and odd-couple counterpart, Frank “Ponch” Poncherello. Supposedly a veteran of the force from another part of the state, Ponch is in fact an undercover FBI agent investigating a corruption case.

As Jon makes a nudge of himself and Ponch gripes about it (until of course, the two inevitably bond), the script lurches from one base topic to another. We visit a locker room where the awkwardness of two straight men embracing while dressed only in their underwear is both played for laughs and discussed: Is being uncomfortable with such a gesture symptomatic of homophobia? Yes, no, ha, ha ha.

We stroll through more than one parking lot so that Ponch and the camera can ogle women in yoga pants as they bend over to put something in the trunk. We already know that Ponch is a philanderer since, as the opening sequence has shown us, he has to write down the name of the girl in bed with him lest he forget it in the morning.

That’s not to mention an extended exchange between the two leads on the enthralling question of why Ponch stops to use the bathroom so often.

There’s also a vaguely pro-divorce message to “CHIPS.” Jon, a washed-up extreme-sports motorcyclist, initially becomes a police recruit in an effort to win back his estranged wife, Karen (Kristen Bell), whose dad was a cop. But he eventually discovers, with Ponch’s help, that Karen is so selfish and greedy, he’s better off without her.

Since juvenile potty and bedroom gags must nowadays be rounded out with nauseating visuals, late developments include the decapitation of one character and the loss of four fingers by another. Lavish attention is paid to the bloody stumps as well as to the dismembered digits lying about like so many stubby breadsticks.

Our advice? Let these “CHIPS” fall where they may. And leave them there.

The film contains scenes of gross-out gore, strong sexual content, including brief graphic activity, masturbation and full male and female nudity, much sexual and scatological humor, frequent profanity and pervasive rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

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‘Logan’ presents dreary killing fest

March 3rd, 2017 Posted in Movies Tags: , ,

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Catholic News Service

Moviegoers unwise enough to take in a showing of “Logan,” the 10th installment of the Marvel Comics-based X-Men series, will discover that the very first word of the dialogue is a four-letter one beginning with “F” and the last image of the film is sacrilegious.

Patrick Stewart and Hugh Jackman star in a scene from the movie "Logan." The Catholic News Service classification is O -- morally offensive.  (CNS photo/Fox)

Patrick Stewart and Hugh Jackman star in a scene from the movie “Logan.” The Catholic News Service classification is O — morally offensive. (CNS photo/Fox)

In between, the grumpy mutant of the title (Hugh Jackman), a character better known as Wolverine, uses his machete-like claws to perforate all who threaten him.

His main adversary is Donald Pierce (Boyd Holbrook). Pierce is an agent of Transigen, a company that has set itself the goal of eliminating all mutants not under their control.

That includes Logan’s current housemates, Professor Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart) and the albino Caliban (Stephen Merchant), as well as Laura (Dafne Keen), a young girl with blades like his own who, as the plot progresses, comes under Logan’s reluctant protection.

Set in the near future, director James Mangold’s action adventure poses as a redemption story for its bad-tempered protagonist. Logan gradually has his disgust with the world softened by Laura’s presence. He also improves his strained relationship with Charles.

But in the midst of all that, he carries on a spree of beheadings, impalements and limb lopping as he vents his anger and his enemies. Worse yet, Laura behaves in a similarly vicious manner, balletically jumping form one extra’s back to the next one’s shoulders as she, so to speak, digs in.

As though this duo wasn’t enough, Transigen has been developing another blade wielder who, once unleashed, starts to get under Logan’s skin.

The upshot is a dreary killing fest that’s gutsy in all the wrong ways.

The film contains excessive gory violence, upper female nudity, about a half-dozen uses of profanity and pervasive rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O, morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R.

 

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

 

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