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Consult the Bible as often as you use a cellphone, pope says

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Christians should care about reading God’s messages in the Bible as much as they care about checking messages on their cellphones, Pope Francis said.

As Christ did in the desert when tempted by Satan, men and women can defend themselves from temptation with the word of God if they “read it often, meditate on it and assimilate it” into their lives, he said before praying the Angelus with those gathered in St. Peter’s Square March 5.

Pope Francis attends the first day of his Lenten retreat at the Pauline Fathers' retreat center in Ariccia, 20 miles southeast of Rome, March 5. The pope and top members of the Roman Curia are on retreat from March 5-10. (CNS/L'Osservatore Romano)

Pope Francis attends the first day of his Lenten retreat at the Pauline Fathers’ retreat center in Ariccia, 20 miles southeast of Rome, March 5. The pope and top members of the Roman Curia are on retreat from March 5-10. (CNS/L’Osservatore Romano)

“What would happen if we turned back when we forget it, if we opened it more times a day, if we read the messages of God contained in the Bible the way we read messages on our cellphones?” the pope asked the crowd.

The pope’s reflection centered on the day’s Gospel reading (Matthew. 4:1-11) in which Jesus is tempted by the devil while fasting in the desert for 40 days and nights before beginning his ministry.

Satan, he said, attempts to dissuade Jesus from fulfilling his message and to undermine his divinity by tempting him twice to perform miracles like “a magician” and lastly, by adoring “the devil in order to have dominion over the world.”

“Through this triple temptation, Satan wants to divert Jesus from the path of obedience and humiliation, because he knows that through that path evil will be defeated, and take him on the false shortcut of success and glory,” the pope said.

However, Jesus deflects “the poisonous arrows of the devil” not with his own words but “only with the Word of God.”

Christians, the pope continued, are called to follow Jesus’ footsteps and “confront the spiritual combat against the evil one” through the power of God’s word which has the “strength to defeat Satan.”

“The Bible contains the word of God, which is always relevant and effective. Someone once said: What would happen if we treated the Bible like we treated our cellphones? What would happen if we always brought it with us, or at least a small pocket-sized Gospel?” he asked.

While the comparison between the Bible and a cellphone is “paradoxical,” he added, it is something that all Christians are called to reflect on during the Lenten season.

“If we have the Word of God always in our hearts, no temptation could separate us from God and no obstacle would deviate us from the path of good,” the pope said.

After praying the Angelus prayer with the faithful in the square, Pope Francis asked for prayers before departing for a weeklong Lenten retreat with members of the Roman Curia.

Lent, he said, “is the path of the people of God toward Easter, a path of conversion, of fighting evil with the weapons of prayer, fasting and works of charity,” Pope Francis said. “I wish everyone a fruitful Lenten journey,” he said.

 

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Pope Francis outlines his principles of reform at Vatican

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — The reform of the Roman Curia is not a mere face-lift to rejuvenate an aging body but a process of deep, personal conversion, Pope Francis said.

Pope Francis greets a cardinal during an audience to exchange Christmas greetings with members of the Roman Curia in Clementine Hall of the Apostolic Palace at the Vatican Dec. 22. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Pope Francis greets a cardinal during an audience to exchange Christmas greetings with members of the Roman Curia in Clementine Hall of the Apostolic Palace at the Vatican Dec. 22. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Meeting with cardinals and the heads of Vatican offices for his annual Christmas greeting, the pope warned that “it is not wrinkles the church should fear” but rather the stains that impede its growth and relevance in the world.

“The reform does not have an aesthetical end to make the Curia more beautiful; it cannot be understood as a sort of face-lift or applying makeup to beautify the elderly curial body, nor plastic surgery to remove wrinkles,” the pope said Dec. 22.

While his addresses in previous years focused on curial ills and medicinal virtues, this year’s speech laid out a 12-step program of guiding principles geared toward an appropriate and long-lasting recovery.

“It was necessary to speak of illnesses and cures so that every operation, to achieve success, be preceded by an in-depth diagnosis, by accurate analyses and must be accompanied and followed through with precise prescriptions,” the pope said.

Although certain forms of resistance to reform may come from a sense of goodwill or fear, there are others that are based on malevolent intentions dressed like a wolf in sheep’s clothing, he said.

“This last type of resistance hides behind justifying words and, in many cases, accusatory; finding refuge in traditions, in appearances, in formality, in what is known, or in wanting to bring everything on a personal level without distinguishing between the act, the actor and the action,” the pope said.

However, no matter whether the intentions are good or bad, resistance is necessary and they “deserve to be heard, received and encouraged because it is a sign that that the body is alive.”

“The absence of reaction is a sign of death!” he said.

Curial reform, however, must be viewed as a slow and delicate process that must be followed through with continuous discernment, wisdom and action but above all, “with many prayers.”

Listing 12 criteria, the pope explained that the reform is at its heart a sign of the church’s liveliness and a “process of growth and above all, conversion.”

The guiding principles of the reform of the Roman Curia are:

  • Individuality (Personal conversion): A person’s spiritual well-being can either strengthen the body of the Curia or damage it and make it sick.
  • Pastoral conversion: The workplace must have a pastoral spirit where “no one feels neglected and mistreated” and everyone can experience the care of the Good Shepherd.
  • Missionary spirit (Christ-centric): Without an authentic evangelical spirit and faithfulness of the church to its own vocation, “any new structure will corrupt in short time.”
  • Rationality: No Vatican office is greater than another and the responsibilities of each office must be clearly distinguished.
  • Functionality: The merging of offices, demotions and promotions must always be done to streamline and hone in a dicastery’s specific mission.
  • Up-to-date (“Aggiornamento”): Vatican offices must read “the signs of times” and adapt to the needs of the universal church.
  • Sobriety: The Roman Curia must be willing to simplify and slim down, especially when it comes to “offices that are no longer responsive to contingent needs.”
  • Subsidiarity: Reorganize priorities within the offices and, if necessary, shifting responsibilities to another dicastery while working in sync with the Secretariat of State.
  • Synodality: Reducing or merging Vatican offices avoids fragmentation and allows for more frequent meetings between the pope and the heads of those offices.
  • Catholicity: The Curia should mirror the universality and multicultural nature of the church and hire personnel from around the world while emphasizing the important role of permanent deacons and the laity, especially women, in the life and mission of the church.
  • Professionalism: Every office must adopt a policy of personal formation to avoid the rust and routine of functionalism, as well as putting a definitive end to the practice of “promoveatur ut amoveatur” (“removal by promotion”). “This is a cancer!” the pope exclaimed.
  • Graduality (Discernment): Taking time by verifying, correcting and discerning methods and policies that can “allow the necessary flexibility to achieve a true reform.”

He also highlighted the various steps, structural changes and continuing processes of the reform throughout his pontificate, all of which are meant to stress that “the heart and center of the reform is Christ.”

Reciting a Christmas prayer written by the late Coptic Orthodox monk, Father Matta El Meskeen, the pope said the birth of Christ is a “celebration of the loving humility of God,” which stands in stark contrast to the logic of ambitions, power, phariseeism, and domination.

Before greeting those present individually, Pope Francis said he had a gift for each one of them: a copy of Jesuit Father Claudio Acquaviva’s 14th-century book, “Curing the Illnesses of the Soul,” a guide for spiritual directors that emphasized expressing views gently without compromising in substance.

“It’s a beautiful translation, it’s well-made and I think it can help,” the pope said.

 

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Don’t mistreat those who come to you, pope tells Roman Curia

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Let no one feel ignored or mistreated when they encounter a member of the Roman Curia or staff working at the Vatican, Pope Francis said.

May everyone experience “the considerate care of the Good Shepherd” himself, who is the foundation and inspiration for all people who serve the church, the pope said during a Mass marking the Jubilee of the Roman Curia and Vatican offices and institutions.

Pope Francis celebrates a Mass for members of the Roman Curia and Vatican staff in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican Feb. 22. The Mass was a special event of the Holy Year of Mercy. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Pope Francis celebrates a Mass for members of the Roman Curia and Vatican staff in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican Feb. 22. The Mass was a special event of the Holy Year of Mercy. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

The jubilee was celebrated Feb. 22, the feast of the Chair of Peter, which commemorates the authority Jesus gave to St. Peter and his successors, the popes.

In his homily, the pope asked the cardinals, bishops, religious and laypeople gathered in St. Peter’s Basilica to keep their minds and hearts “fixed on Jesus Christ, the beginning and the end of every action of the church. He is the foundation and no one can establish something different. He is the rock upon which we must build.”

By passing through the Holy Door of mercy and praying before the tomb of St. Peter, those assembled were asked to repeat the profession of faith and reflect on their call to conform their lives to God.

For those who are priests, the pope said, they more than anyone else must model themselves after the Good Shepherd: taking care of his flock, seeking out the lost sheep and bringing healing to the sick and wounded.

“It’s a faithful, constant and unconditional commitment” to be a sign of God’s boundless love, he said, “so that all of the weakest may meet his mercy.”

Asking that they pray God enlighten, purify and transform them in their mission, the pope said they must also cultivate and practice this same pastoral ministry in their work at the Vatican.

With all of the people they encounter each day, he said, “may no one feel neglected or mistreated,” and instead feel God’s attentive concern.

“We are called to be God’s collaborators,” he said, as they carry out their unique and valuable mission.

“Let’s let the Lord free us from every temptation that distances us from what is essential in our mission and rediscover the beauty of professing the faith in the Lord Jesus.”

Being faithful and being merciful are two sides of the same coin, he said, because being faithful is acting and living according to Christ’s heart, which is filled with mercy for others.

Mass for the Roman Curia and Vatican staff was the culmination of a number of morning events marking the special jubilee. Thousands of employees, including family members, walked through the Holy Door of the basilica in a solemn procession from the Paul VI audience hall.

Cardinals in Rome led the procession, followed by archbishops and bishops who head curial offices. Pope Francis joined the long procession with a large group of laypeople and religious, walking prayerfully with the large crowd. Priests and monsignors were the last through the door and into the basilica.

The day’s events began with a spiritual meditation in the Paul VI hall led by Jesuit Father Marko Rupnik.

With the pope, top curial officials and many Vatican employees present, Father Rupnik said every central church office, not just the Curia in Rome, risks the temptation of its administrators becoming too self-centered.

“It is a terrible temptation,” he said, because it sets functional efficiency, the institution, the organizational structure and the individual above all else.

The focus on the individual not only can let in “all the pathologies of the world,” it causes scandal when the world sees “us living Christianity as an individual reality” and not joined together as part of the body of the church and Christ, he said.

“The demon of individual perfection is the ruin” of the body of the church and communion, he said.

“The perfection of the church is in organization,” the Jesuit priest said, which is not just setting up a bunch of commissions. It means the church shows the world how to organize, lead and manage life in a way that transforms and transcends the individual.

This kind of “organization” in the church shows a fractured world what including and serving others means and “it manifests a deeper reality.”

When people encounter someone who works for the church, it is beautiful when they say, “you know, I saw people who were free, free from themselves,” generous, willing and available.

“This is what must emerge” and that is what will have an impact on the rest of the world, he said.

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Seasonal checkup: Pope prescribes spiritual virtues to fight curial ills

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Catholic News Service
VATICAN CITY (CNS) — If Pope Francis sees the church as a field hospital after battle, then his annual Christmas address to the Roman Curia often looks like the triage tent, with him holding the charts.
Instead of a typical gathering to exchange just thanks and best wishes, Pope Francis uses this year-end moment with cardinals and top officials to offer “fraternal correction,” spiritual direction and his clear expectation of their role as servants, not masters, of the church. Read more »

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Pope, Roman Curia heads discuss refugees, dialogue with Muslims

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — The difficulties facing migrants coming into Europe and the continuing dialogues with Muslims were among the topics discussed during Pope Francis’ meeting with the heads of the Roman Curia offices, the Vatican spokesman said.

Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, Vatican spokesman, said the Nov.16 meeting did not deal with the pope’s reform of the Curia or with further changes to the existing offices. The pope had announced Oct. 22 the establishment of a new office for laity, family and life, which combines the responsibilities of two pontifical councils.

“It is one of the normal dicastery meetings that are scheduled every six months,” Father Lombardi said.

Noting that the themes of the meeting were scheduled in advance, Father Lombardi told journalists that the plight of migrants and the problems facing refugees and the countries that receive them were discussed. The Pontifical Council for Migrants and Travelers, headed by Cardinal Antonio Maria Veglio, wanted to update the pope and members of the Curia on its work in aiding thousands of migrants and refugees coming into Europe.

Father Lombardi said the meeting also focused on the continuing dialogue with Muslims, an area of discussion that was requested by Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, president of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue.

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With reorganization, cardinals named to Roman Curia offices

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Giving assignments to 15 of the cardinals he created in February, Pope Francis named some of them members of pontifical councils widely expected to be merged with others.

In the months following their induction into the College of Cardinals, those who who are under the age of 80 are named members of various Vatican congregations and councils; while the day-to-day work of Vatican offices is carried out by the staff, the direction and major decisions of the offices are determined by the full membership.

As Pope Francis began another three-day meeting April 13 with his international Council of Cardinals to discuss the reorganization of the Roman Curia, the Vatican published the list of his assignments for the cardinals created in February.

Several of them were assigned to the pontifical councils for justice and peace, Cor Unum, migrants and travelers, and health care ministry — all offices that had been expected to merge into a new Congregation for Charity, Justice and Peace.

In February, the entire College of Cardinals was briefed about the Council of Cardinals’ progress, including proposals to create the new charity, justice and peace congregation. They also heard of plans to establish a Congregation for Laity, Family and Life, merging the current pontifical councils for laity and for the family, along with the Pontifical Academy for Life. No new members of the councils for laity or for the family were announced in the slate released April 13.

Among the assignments, Pope Francis named Cardinal John A. Dew of Wellington, New Zealand, to be a member of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples and of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity.

Spanish Cardinal Ricardo Blazquez Perez of Valladolid, a theologian and president of the Spanish bishops’ conference, was the only one of the new cardinals named a member of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

The youngest member of the College of Cardinals, Tonga’s 53-year-old Cardinal Soane Mafi, was named a member of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples and the Pontifical Council Cor Unum, which promotes and coordinates Catholic charitable giving.

Portuguese Cardinal Manuel Macario do Nascimento Clemente of Lisbon and Thai Cardinal Francis Xavier Kriengsak Kovithavanij of Bangkok were named to the Pontifical Council for Social Communications.

 

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Pope’s Christmas greeting warns Vatican officials of being prone to spiritual ills, dysfunction, gossip

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis’ Christmas greeting to the Vatican bureaucracy this year was an extended warning against a host of spiritual ills to which he said Vatican officials are prone, including “spiritual Alzheimer’s,” “existential schizophrenia,” publicity-seeking, the “terrorism of gossip” and even a poor sense of humor.

Pope Francis exchanges Christmas greetings with members of the Roman Curia during an audience in Clementine Hall at the Vatican Dec. 22. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Pope Francis exchanges Christmas greetings with members of the Roman Curia during an audience in Clementine Hall at the Vatican Dec. 22. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

The pope made his remarks Dec. 22, in a biting half-hour speech to heads of the Roman Curia, the church’s central administration, and to cardinals resident in Rome.

Popes have often used their annual Christmas speech to review events of the previous year and lay out priorities for the next. Pope Francis’ nine-member Council of Cardinals is currently working on an overhaul of the Curia, but the pope’s speech did not address specific reforms. Instead, he spoke in general terms of virtues and values, saying he hoped his words might serve officials as a “support and stimulus to a true examination of conscience” in preparation for the sacrament of reconciliation.

The pope, who has made criticism of the church’s leaders a common theme of his preaching, called the Curia a “dynamic body” naturally vulnerable to “maladies, to dysfunction, to infirmities.”

He offered what he called a catalog of 15 such diseases. Most corresponded to vices for which he has frequently rebuked the hierarchy, including self-promotion, greed and a focus on bureaucratic efficiency over pastoral solicitude. But the pope’s rhetoric this time was especially impassioned and forceful.

Following a year in which Vatican officials and other bishops aired differences to a remarkable degree in the press, especially during the October Synod of Bishops on the family, Pope Francis warned against “exhibitionism,” the “malady of persons who seek insatiably to increase their power and to that end are capable of calumniating, defaming and discrediting others, even in newspapers and magazines.”

The pope denounced the “hypocrisy typical of the mediocre” and said an apostle who puts excessive faith in planning becomes a mere “bookkeeper or accountant” who would “confine and control the liberty of the Holy Spirit.” He said an official who forgets his personal relationship with Jesus becomes completely dependent on his “passions, whims and manias,” “incapable of carrying out any autonomous activity, living in a state of absolute dependence on his often imaginary views.”

Officials who idolize their bosses are “victims of careerism and opportunism,” “mean persons, unhappy and inspired only by their own fatal egoism,” the pope said, acknowledging that bosses often encourage such attitudes to obtain “submission, loyalty and psychological dependence” from their staff.

Deriding a “gruff and grim” manner he described as characteristic of the insecure, Pope Francis called for a “joyous spirit, full of humor and even self-mockery, that makes us amiable persons, even in difficult situations.” The pope said that every day he recites a prayer, which he attributed to St. Thomas More, asking God for a sense of humor.

The pope wound up his remarks on a note of encouragement, saying that the failings of a few have discredited the virtuous majority of the church’s ministers. He quoted an adage that “priests are like airplanes, they make news only when they fall, but there are so many that fly.”

After the speech in the Vatican’s Clementine Hall, the pope spent about half an hour exchanging Christmas greetings with individual cardinals and curial members.

 

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Pope confirms retirement age of 75 for bishops, including in Roman Curia

November 5th, 2014 Posted in Vatican News Tags: , , ,

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — While all bishops offer to resign at age 75, those who are not cardinals and are working in the Roman Curia, including as presidents of pontifical councils, automatically end their service on their 75th birthdays, said a new document from Pope Francis.

The ministry of a bishop in a diocese or in the Roman Curia requires a total commitment of energy, and anything, including age, that decreases the ability to dedicate oneself fully to serving the church and the faithful is a valid reason for offering to retire, said the brief new document, released by the Vatican Nov. 5.

The text of “dispositions regarding the resignation of diocesan bishops and holders of offices of pontifical nomination” was signed by Pope Francis Nov. 3 and was to take effect Nov. 5.

Passionist Father Ciro Benedettini, a Vatican spokesman, said there was nothing truly new in the document, but it is a “strong re-proposal of existing norms.”

The 1983 Code of Canon Law and the 1990 Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches already require most bishops to submit their resignations at the age of 75; the pope is not required, however, to accept them.

The new document says that when the pope accepts a bishop’s retirement, the bishop automatically ceases to hold any fixed-term office he may have on a national level, for example as an officer of the national bishops’ conference.

The document also formally restated the power of the pope in a “fraternal dialogue” to request a bishop’s resignation when he believes it is necessary, “after having made known the reasons for such a request.”

St. John Paul II’s 1988 constitution on the organization of the Curia required all cardinals and bishops working at the Vatican to submit offers of resignation at 75. However, in the 1988 document, only non-cardinal “moderators and secretaries” of Vatican offices automatically retired at 75.

The new document says, “Non-cardinal heads of dicasteries in the Roman Curia, the secretaries and bishops who fulfill other offices of pontifical nomination forfeit their office on the completion of their 75th year.”

With the exception of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments, which was without a prefect when the papal document was published, in early November all congregations were headed by a cardinal as were eight of the 12 pontifical councils.

The four non-cardinals who head pontifical councils are: Archbishops Claudio Maria Celli, 73, president of the council for social communications; Vincenzo Paglia, 69, president of the council for the family; Zygmunt Zimowski, 65, president of the council for health care ministry; and Rino Fisichella, 63, president of the council for promoting new evangelization.

In addition to fulltime staff members, Vatican congregations and pontifical councils also have members who include both the heads of other Vatican offices as well as cardinals, bishops, priests, religious and laity from around the world. Pope Francis reaffirmed that membership automatically ends when a person turns 80, although he added that if the person is a member of a congregation or council because of the main office he holds, when he retires from his main office his term as a member of other congregations and councils also ends.

Canon law permits a bishop to resign before age 75 “because of ill health or some other grave cause,” but the new document praises bishops who do so because they realize they are no longer able to fulfill their obligations.

“Worthy of the church’s appreciation is the gesture of one who, motivated by love and the desire for a better service to the community, believes it is necessary because of ill health or other serious reason to renounce his office as pastor before reaching the age of 75,” it says. “In such cases the faithful are called to demonstrate solidarity and understanding for the one who was their pastor, providing him punctual assistance in accordance with the requirements of charity and justice.”

The document says Pope Francis made his decisions based on canon law and on “the recommendations of the Council of Cardinals” assisting him “in the preparation of the reform of the Roman Curia and in the governance of the church.”

 

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Pope says it’s important to follow Jesus with hope and a sense of humor

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Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — At the end of his Lenten retreat, Pope Francis said he and his closest collaborators at the Vatican “want to follow Jesus more closely, without losing hope in his promises and without losing a sense of humor.”

The pope and 82 members of the Roman Curia, who left the Vatican by bus March 9 to travel the 20 miles to the Pauline Fathers’ retreat and conference center in Ariccia, returned to the Vatican by bus March 14.

Pope Francis rides in a bus with cardinals and bishops at the and of their weeklong Lenten retreat in Ariccia, Italy, March 14. At the end of the retreat, Pope Francis said he and his closest collaborators at the Vatican “want to follow Jesus more closely, without losing hope in his promises and without losing a sense of humor.” (CNS photo/L’Osservatore Romano via Reuters)

Before they left the retreat house, Pope Francis thanked Msgr. Angelo De Donatis, the pastor of St. Mark’s parish in the center of Rome, whom he had chosen to guide the Lenten retreat.

“We are returning home with a good seed, the seed of the word of God,” the pope told him. “The Lord will send the rain and that seed will grow. It will grow and bear fruit. We thank the Lord for the seed and for the rain he will send, but we also want to thank the sower.”

Pope Francis said Msgr. De Donatis really knew what he was doing. “He threw some seed here and he threw some there without knowing it, or pretending not to know, but he hit the mark.”

The 10 meditations offered by the monsignor focused on “the purification of the heart.”

While the meditations were not made public, the Vatican newspaper offered brief reports on their content. According to L’Osservatore Romano, Msgr. De Donatis began the final reflections March 13 talking about how no one could understand the value of God’s love using economics or commerce, which too often are the only way modern people determine the value of anything.

He told the story of a little boy in a first Communion class in his parish who asked him, “Do you know Jesus so well through your work or are you friends?” Msgr. De Donatis told the pope and Curia officials that the only way to truly know Jesus is through friendship and love.

 

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Cardinal Law turns 80, replaced at Rome basilica

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VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Cardinal Bernard F. Law, former archbishop of Boston, has been replaced as archpriest of the Rome Basilica of St. Mary Major, the Vatican announced.

In a regular bulletin listing church appointments and resignations Nov. 21, the Vatican said Pope Benedict XVI had named Spanish Archbishop Santos Abril Castello, the Vatican’s vice chamberlain, to the post.

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