Home » Posts tagged 'Saint of the Week'

Saint of the Week: St. Zita

April 20th, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized Tags:

By

 

Saint Zita

Feast Day: April 27

 

At age 12 Zita began working as a domestic in the household of a wealthy weaver in Lucca, Italy, and remained there her entire life. Initially,

St. Zita (CNS)

St. Zita (CNS)

the devout and punctilious Zita antagonized her fellow servants, and drew the ire of her employers for lavish gifts of food to the poor. But she gradually won over everyone by her goodness, and was put in charge of the house. Later in life, she spent much time visiting the sick and imprisoned. At her death, she already was acclaimed a saint in Lucca and her cult spread to England through Lucchese merchants in London.

Comments Off on Saint of the Week: St. Zita

Saint of the Week: Bernadette Soubirous

April 11th, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized Tags:

By

 

Saint Bernadette Soubirous

Feast Day: April 16

St. Bernadette Soubirous is pictured in this undated photo provided by the Sanctuaries of Our Lady of Lourdes in Lourdes, France. (CNS photo/Durand, courtesy of Sanctuaries of Our Lady of Lourdes)

St. Bernadette Soubirous is pictured in this undated photo provided by the Sanctuaries of Our Lady of Lourdes in Lourdes, France. (CNS photo/Durand, courtesy of Sanctuaries of Our Lady of Lourdes)

As a child in a poor French family in the Hautes-Pyrenees town of Lourdes, Bernadette suffered both asthma and cholera. Uneducated, she had not made her first Communion by 1858, the year she experienced 18 visions of a beautiful lady calling herself the Immaculate Conception and calling for penance and pilgrimage.

Bernadette was unchanged by this extraordinary experience, and in 1866 became a member of the Sisters of Charity, taking the name Maria-Bernarda. Chronically ill after 1875 with worsening asthma and tuberculosis of the bones, she died at age 35. When she was canonized in 1933, it was not for being the Lourdes visionary, but for her simple life of prayer, devotion and obedience.

Comments Off on Saint of the Week: Bernadette Soubirous

Saint of the Week: Magdalen Canossa

April 6th, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized Tags:

By

 

Saint Magdalen Canossa

Feast Day: April 10

 

This foundress, born to a noble family in Verona, Italy, lost her father at age 5 and was abandoned by her mother when she remarried.

15st14c

Saint Magdalen Canossa

Choosing religious life over an advantageous marriage, Magdalen first joined the Carmelites, but left when she saw that their strict rules of enclosure would prohibit her charitable works.

She began a new community, the Canossian Daughters of Charity, in 1799 by bringing two poor girls into her own home. The institute spread throughout Italy, and Magdalen helped found an order of priests and a third order for laypeople.

Canossians minister today in Italy, Latin America and the Philippines. Magdalen, who was canonized in 1988, famously said, “Those who love are never tired, since love knows no burden.”

Comments Off on Saint of the Week: Magdalen Canossa

Saint of the Week: Benedict the Moor

March 30th, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized Tags: ,

By

Saint Benedict the Moor

Feast Day: April 4

Born near Messina, on the Italian island of Sicily, Benedict was the son of African slaves who, as their eldest

St. Benedict the Moor

St. Benedict the Moor

son, was given his freedom. Growing up, he was nicknamed “il moro sante” (“the holy Moor”) for his piety and good works.

He became a hermit and then the community’s superior; but, after the pope ordered them to disband in 1562, Benedict became a Franciscan lay brother. He served as cook, but drew many visitors and supplicants with his reputation for holiness and miracles.

Despite his illiteracy, Benedict was chosen as superior and also as novice master, before being allowed to return to his kitchen refuge.

He is a patron saint of Palermo, Sicily, and of blacks in the United States.

Comments Off on Saint of the Week: Benedict the Moor

Saint of the Week – Margaret Clitherow

March 23rd, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized Tags:

By

St. Margaret Clitherow

St. Margaret Clitherow

Saint Margaret Clitherow

Feast Day: March 25

 

Born into a prosperous York Protestant family when Catholicism was forbidden, Margaret married wealthy Protestant John Clitherow, whose brother became a Catholic priest. Margaret soon became a Catholic and set up Mass centers in her home and a nearby inn. She was imprisoned three times for failing to attend Protestant services. When officials confirmed the secret Masses, Margaret was sentenced to death for treason. She died a martyr, pressed to death by a heavy load.

Comments Off on Saint of the Week – Margaret Clitherow

Saint of the Week – Frances of Rome

March 9th, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized Tags:

By

Saint Frances of Rome

Feast Day: March 9

St. Frances of Rome (CNS)

St. Frances of Rome (CNS)

 

This laywoman and foundress, born a Roman aristocrat, married Lorenzo Ponziano when she was 13; they had several children. In 1409, their palazzo was pillaged by Neapolitan soldiers and Lorenzo was exiled for five years, returning home a broken man. He died in 1436. Frances, known for her great charity during epidemics and civil war, organized a ladies society dedicated to self-denial and good works. It became the Oblates of Tor de Specchi, which she directed for her last four years. She is the patron saint of motorists, perhaps because she was guarded for 23 years by an archangel visible only to her. Her last words were: “The angel has finished his work. He is beckoning me to follow.”

Comments Off on Saint of the Week – Frances of Rome

Saint of the week — Anne Line

February 23rd, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized Tags: , ,

By

Feast day: Feb. 27

Anne is one of three laywomen among the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales canonized in 1970 by Pope Paul VI.

St. Anne Line statue at Church of St Etheldreda in London. (2012) (Photo by Marcin Mazur)

St. Anne Line statue at Church of St Etheldreda in London.  (Photo by Marcin Mazur)

Anne Heigham and her brother were disowned by their Protestant father for converting to Catholicism. She married another disinherited convert, Roger Line, who died in exile in Flanders in 1594. Left penniless and always in poor health, Anne began working with Jesuits in London, where she organized and operated safe houses for priests and embroidered vestments. She took voluntary vows of poverty, chastity and obedience.

Within one month, February 1601, she was arrested, tried at the Old Bailey, convicted of hiding a priest, and hanged at Tyburn. Anne is a patron of the childless, widows and converts.

 

 

 

Comments Off on Saint of the week — Anne Line
Marquee Powered By Know How Media.