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Viewpoint: Deny Dover’s death-dealing bills

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Spring, nature’s season of rebirth and growth, has taken on a deadly aspect in Dover’s Legislative Hall with the introduction of three bills this session that focus on ending lives in Delaware.

One bill, Senate Bill 5, would officially make the Federal legalization of abortion part of the Delaware code of laws. The move might seem redundant, but the bill is intended to create back-up law for the First State to invoke, should the Supreme Court ever reverse its 44 years of rulings regarding Roe v. Wade.

Bishop Malooly, in a statement on SB5, has reiterated in his opposition to the measure. He stated on May 1 that the right to life is the first and most fundamental human right, that abortion denies God’s gift of life and dignity to the most vulnerable, and that “the life and dignity of every person must be respected and protected at every stage and every condition. This applies to the unborn as well as the sick, the elderly and those on death row.” Read more »

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Bishop Malooly’s letter to priests decries anti-life bills in Dover

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On May 3, Bishop Malooly wrote a letter to priests of the Diocese of Wilmington regarding three bills introduced this legislative session in Dover that would: codify in state law legalized abortion; amend the state’s death penalty statute in order to restore capital punishment; and legalized physician-assisted suicide.

The following is the text of the bishop’s letter to priests on Wednesday: Read more »

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Chrism Mass homily: Share, speak and witness the Good News to others

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The following is Bishop Malooly’s prepared text for his April 10 Chrism Mass homily at Holy Cross Church in Dover. Each year at the Chrism Mass the bishop blesses the oil of the Sick and the oil of the Catechumens and consecrates the chrism, a mixture of balsam and oil, that’s used for baptisms, confirmations and ordinations during the coming year at parishes in the diocese.

Bishop Malooly blesses the holy oils during the Chrism Mass April 10 at Holy Cross Church in Dover. (The Dialog)

Bishop Malooly blesses the holy oils during the Chrism Mass April 10 at Holy Cross Church in Dover. (The Dialog)

This is my ninth Chrism Mass. As I have said before, for some reason this is always a very significant moment of transition for me. Almost like the beginning of a new year. Tonight, we bless the sacramental oils and my brothers and I renew our priestly commitment. Today, even as we celebrate priesthood and bless the sacramental oils, I am very grateful for all who serve our church.

For this Chrism Mass, I look ahead with hope and I look back with gratitude. We have weathered together many challenges. I especially want to thank my brother priests for their support, faith, leadership and positive outlook. You have kept your parishes and ministries alive and vibrant in some difficult years.

And now we continue to celebrate with Pope Francis as he enters his fifth year. As we are moving ahead in Wilmington, he has the church moving ahead. When Jesus began his public ministry, he returned to Galilee and we hear that the power of the Spirit was with him as he quotes from the prophet Isaiah and the news about him spread throughout the whole region. He outlined clearly how he would live. Pope Francis has done the same in both words and actions and indicated what he expects of us.

Jesus’ mission reached out to all people, especially to those in need: the poor, the captives, the blind, and the oppressed. Our Holy Father, Pope Francis, echoes this for us, telling us to go out to the peripheries, as Christ did. Our lives must reach out to accompany others.

Today, that requires us to advocate on behalf of our immigrants and refugees – our brothers and sisters in Christ – no matter where they are from, children of our God. We welcome them and support them. I have visited many of our Hispanic communities in the past year to encourage them. And our bishops’ conference nationally works everyday on Capitol Hill, advocating on their behalf.

To continue Jesus’ mission as a diocese, we have set our goals for the coming years — vocations, catechesis, evangelization, and some slightly new models of ministry. We are moving; we are making progress.

I would, once again, appeal to all of us at this Chrism Mass and throughout Holy Week to intensify our efforts to pray for vocations to the priesthood and to the consecrated life. I am grateful for the work of Father Norm Carroll and his ever growing vocation team of priests. The more of our priests who celebrate the good news of their call, with joy, the more we will attract others.

Tonight, we gather with some of our catechumens and candidates as we did earlier here at the Rite of Election. As in every year they energize the rest of us. As a church we continue to grow even as Mass attendance in some places declines. Our new members step forward because they have found the truth.

Talking about energy and life – if you were not at our eighth annual youth pilgrimage this past Saturday – the theme “Love without Measure”you missed a wonderful opportunity to have your faith reinforced by the youth and young adults of our diocese. We had 800 people marching, carrying the cross, and witnessing to their faith. They celebrated reconciliation, took part in the Stations of the Cross, spent time in adoration before the Blessed Sacrament, and carried the blessed palm from St. Hedwig to celebrate Mass at St. Elizabeth. For me, it is always a remarkable way to begin Holy Week and connect with our present and future church. You can’t help but be caught up in hope.

During this week we will once again remember, commemorate and celebrate the sacred mysteries of our redemption.

On Thursday we will gather to celebrate the Eucharist, commemorating that first Eucharist at the Last Supper, while at the same time we will be focused on washing one another’s feet. Both go together; Jesus comes to each of us to encourage us to serve the needs of his brothers and sisters.

On Good Friday, we will celebrate our Lord’s suffering and death that selfless gift that gives each of us eternal life. It is our core message and God’s greatest gift. At the vigil and on Easter Sunday, we will remember the joy of that first Easter. And the disciples and holy men and women with the power received from the Holy Spirit at Pentecost used the simple tools of words, faces, and conviction to spread the message and did so extremely well.

Two thouand and some years later, it is our turn. We are encouraged by the Lord’s presence among us. We are truly blessed. Let us share, speak, and witness that good news to others.

For us priests and for all of us the Eucharist is the center of our lives and our love for the Eucharist deepens and broadens over time. To move into a deeper relationship with Christ for all of us means moving more deeply into the Eucharist. When people come to you, let them see Jesus in you. That is why it is so important for all of us to recommit ourselves to the celebration of the Eucharist.

When I was installed as your bishop on September 8, 2008, I said, “I will lead but I want to walk with you and I want you to walk with me.” I actually bumbled the words but you knew what I meant and you have done the walk. I had no idea then how complex the walk would be for all of us. The walk will continue to be challenging in different ways than earlier. I need you to continue to walk with me and I thank you for that. God bless you all. And thank you.  Amen.

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Holy Cross students enter Catholic Church with a crowd

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Dialog reporter

Zachary and Nicholas Klaus tell parents they want to be baptized, then share special day with classmates

 

DOVER — “Today, we have two members we want to welcome.”

With those words, Deacon Bob McMullen began the baptism service for Zachary and Nicholas Klaus, brothers who are in kindergarten and pre-k, respectively, at Holy Cross School. They were brought into the church March 23 in front of their classmates, teachers, and a few family members and friends. Read more »

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Almost 600 students attend third annual diocesan Vocations Day

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Bishop Malooly, the Office of Priestly and Religious Vocations and the Office for Catholic Schools hosted the Third Annual Vocations Day at Holy Cross Parish in Dover, Nov. 9

Rev. Mr. Rich Jasper, a transitional deacon of the Diocese of Wilmington, gives the keynote address Nov. 9 at the Third Annual Diocesan Vocations Day. More than 500 sixth-graders attended the event. (Photo courtesy of Father Norman P. Carroll, director, Office of Priestly and Religious Vocations.)

Rev. Mr. Rich Jasper, a transitional deacon of the Diocese of Wilmington, gives the keynote address Nov. 9 at the Third Annual Diocesan Vocations Day. More than 500 sixth-graders attended the event. (Photo courtesy of Father Norman P. Carroll, director, Office of Priestly and Religious Vocations.)

The event, attended by more than 500 sixth-graders from 17 Catholic schools in the diocese, included a keynote address by Rev. Mr. Rich Jasper, a transitional deacon for the Diocese of Wilmington. Nov. 9 was picked because it’s during Vocations Awareness Week, Nov. 6-12.

In addition to the main presentation, Bishop Malooly along with priests, religious sisters and brothers also talked to the sixth-grade students about their vocations and answered questions about priestly and religious life during smaller group sessions.

For information about vocations in the church, call the diocesan Office of Priestly and Religious Vocations, 302-573-3113.

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Bishop Malooly blesses holy oils during Chrism Mass in Dover

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Priests from the Diocese of Wilmington joined Bishop Malooly at the annual Chrism Mass March 21,  7 p.m., at Holy Cross Church in Dover.

Bishop Malooly blesses the chrism by breathing on it, during the annual Chrism Mass at Holy Cross Church in Dover March 21. (The Dialog)

Bishop Malooly blesses the chrism by breathing on it, during the annual Chrism Mass at Holy Cross Church in Dover March 21. (The Dialog)

During the Mass, the bishop blessed the sacred oils used at parishes during the year. Bishop Malooly blessed the chrism, consisting of olive oil mixed with scented balsam, by breathing on the container of it. Chrism is used for anointing in the sacraments of baptism, confirmation and holy orders.

The oils of the sick and for catechumens are also blessed during the Mass.

Representatives of parishes throughout the diocese take portions of the blessed oil back to their communities for use during the year.

 

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‘Use your voices to proclaim the faith’ — Bishop Malooly’s Chrism Mass homily

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The following is taken from Bishop Malooly’s homily at the Chrism Mass on March 30 at Holy Cross Church in Dover.

It’s great to be with all of you here. This is one of the wonderful once-a-year celebrations. This is my seventh Chrism Mass (as bishop of Wilmington).

Bishop Malooly stirs the balm into the holy oil before consecrating the sacred chrism during the Chrism Mass March 30 at Holy Cross Church in Dover. (Jason Minto for The Dialog)

Bishop Malooly stirs the balm into the holy oil before consecrating the sacred chrism during the Chrism Mass March 30 at Holy Cross Church in Dover.

For some reason this is always a very significant moment of transition for me. Almost like the beginning of a new year, even though it’s nestled in Holy Week.

It’s a time to welcome new members, to bless and consecrate the sacramental oils and to have my brothers and myself renew our priestly commitment.

The holy chrism is used to anoint the newly baptized, to seal the candidates for confirmation and to anoint the hands of presbyters (priests) and the heads of bishops at their ordinations, as well as in the rites of anointing pertaining to the dedication of churches and altars.

The oil of catechumens is used in preparation of the catechumens for their baptism. The oil of the sick is used in the comfort and support of the sick in their infirmity.

Today as we celebrate, I am very grateful for so many women and men in consecrated life, who offer us such powerful witness in different ministries.

Many of our priests in religious communities have been joining us in great numbers in recent years. Our Franciscans, our Oblates, I’m very happy to have all of you. Many of you are involved in our parishes, too, and for that I’m grateful.

This is the Year of Consecrated Life, so it’s even more important.

I also want to acknowledge our permanent deacons and their wives, all of our dedicated diocesan, parish, school and Charities employees and coworkers. Each of you has a mission and a ministry and it’s important for all of us.

With this Chrism Mass, I look forward with hope. I look back with gratitude. I especially want to thank my brother priests for their support, their faith, their leadership and their positive outlook. You have kept your parishes and ministries alive and vibrant.

Yesterday, Pope Francis, to the youth of the world, said, “Have the courage to be happy.” And I ask the same of you. It’s not always easy for us but it’s so important, to continue to bring joy to where you minister.

I want to thank you now for the first time for the remarkable effort you made on behalf of the capital campaign. It was successful because the pastors made it successful in parishes. For that, I’m very grateful.

The Gospel is familiar. When Jesus began his public ministry he returned to Galilee. When he came to Nazareth, where he was raised, he stood up in his own synagogue and read from the prophet Isaiah: “The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me. Because he has anointed me to bring glad tidings to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives and recovery of sight to the blind,

to let the oppressed go free and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.”

Then he rolls up the scroll and the first thing he says in his public ministry, “Today, this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.”

This would be what he did during his public ministry, how he would reach out and serve the needs of all he met.

When we look at Pope Francis’ agenda and how he deals with all kinds of people, especially the poor and needy, you see a very similar model as we hear in Isaiah and see in Jesus.

Today, as I always do, I would once again appeal to all of us to intensify our efforts to pray for vocations to the priesthood and the consecrated life.

I am grateful for the work Father Dave Kelley and his vocation team of priests do. I also thank my brother priests who have been working with the Come and Seek program for the gathering together of young men with a group of priests just to sit down and discuss (the priesthood).

My four seminarians — and I wish there were more but they are outstanding — are here this evening. They are serving and I’m grateful that you are here.

Are there many of our catechumens or candidates here who will be received into the church at the Easter Vigil? We had about 200 at the Rite of Election and it’s good to have you’re here.

Every year our candidates and catechumens create a lot of energy for us. I saw that once again on Saturday. If you were not at our sixth annual Youth Pilgrimage, we had just short of 1,200 people marching, carrying the cross and witnessing to their faith.

When we passed a place, people would run out and say, “What are you doing?”

And they would say, “We’re witnessing our belief in Jesus and what he did for us.”

So even by their expressions and demeanor, it made a great witness for those who were there.

It was a shoehorned event at St. Hedwig, as Father Andrew (Molewski) knows, getting them in for the Stations.

We had the adoration and Benediction and St. Paul’s; reconciliation at St. Anthony’s. Stations of the Cross, beautiful Stations, at St. Hedwig’s, and Mass back at St. Elizabeth’s.

The enthusiasm of our young people was not only energizing for us, who were the adults there, but I also think it was very helpful for them to see the faith of so many of their peers and the willingness to express that.

They were positive, they were upbeat, they were filled with joy. And they understood Pope Francis’ challenge to have the courage to be happy.

At the time of the millennium, some 15 years ago now, Pope John Paul wrote, and I love this phrase, “All initiatives should be set in relationship to holiness, which expresses best the mystery of the church.”

All of our initiatives, all of our activities should be set in relationship to holiness which expresses best the mystery of the church.

No one who suffered as long as he did and was as holy as he was could miss this realization. He knew it firsthand and he knew it substantively.

We are to be holy within the unique gifts and personality God has given us.

As our Oblate brothers and sisters remind us, quoting St. Francis de Sales, “Be who you are and be that well.”

That’s true of every one of us. I know my brother priests take that seriously and we all should.

During this week, we will once again remember, commemorate and celebrate the sacred mysteries of our redemption. On Thursday, we will gather to celebrate the Eucharist, commemorating that first Eucharist at the Last Supper. At the same time, we will be focused on service, by the Washing of the Feet.

On Good Friday, we will celebrate our Lord’s suffering and death, that selfless gift that gives each of us eternal life.

At the Vigil and on Easter Sunday, we will remember the joy of that first Easter.

Some 2,000 years-plus later, we are encouraged by the Lord’s presence among us. We are truly blessed. He asked very little of us. I think he wants us to do what the early disciples did: to speak the Good News to others that Jesus suffered, died and rose that we might have eternal life. No more complex, no simpler, just simple fact: Jesus suffered, died and rose that we might have eternal life.

I ask you during this Holy Week to speak that phrase to your friends who might not be as connected to the Lord as you are. To do what Paul and the holy men and women of the first century did. They didn’t have pamphlets or books, they had voices and they used those voices to proclaim your faith.

Let us do the same.

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Dover couple, tested in military and on home front, become Catholic

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Staff reporter

DOVER – Years of spiritual seeking ended at the Easter vigil April 7 at Holy Cross Church as Michel and Lisa Kasday entered the Catholic Church. For the Camden-Wyoming couple, it wasn’t really that simple. In their lives, few things are.

Like many couples in this part of Kent County, the Kasdays are a military family. Mike, 40, is a staff sergeant and an engine mechanic at Dover Air Force Base, and his wife is studying nursing at Delaware Technical Community College. They have dealt with deployments and work schedules that are anything but 9-to-5.

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Reagan Garnsey’s pre-K classmates attend her baby sister’s baptism at Holy Cross in Dover

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Staff reporter

 DOVER – All the elements required for a baptism were in place at Holy Cross Church on April 4, the Wednesday before Easter. There was the adorable baby, Payton Amelia Garnsey, in her white dress; two beaming parents and big sister; and godparents and other family.

Also in the church, seated next to the baptismal font, were 16 pre-kindergarten students, classmates of Reagan Garnsey, whose sister was the guest of honor. They were there because Reagan’s parents, Angela and Brian, wanted the class and its teacher, Patricia Wegemer, to share in their special day.

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Joy on the journey: More than 200 begin final steps to become Catholics

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Dialog Editor

Bishop Malooly emphasized the joy on the journey to joining the Catholic Church during the Feb. 25 rites for catechumens and candidates at Holy Cross Church in Dover.

He welcomed more than 200 people from the Diocese of Wilmington who began their Lenten journey toward baptism or full membership in the church that will culminate when they receive sacraments at this year’s Easter Vigil.

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