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‘Be Jesus for others’: Bishop Malooly’s homily at the ordination of Father Rich Jasper

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The following is excerpted from the text of Bishop Malooly’s homily during the Ordination Mass of Father Jasper, May 20, at the Cathedral of St. Peter in Wilmington.

 

On behalf of the Church of Wilmington I want to begin by thanking Rich’s parents, Rick and Kathy, for bringing their son to life in Christ through baptism. Also, Brian, we are grateful for your support of your brother.

It is in baptism that the seeds of the priestly vocation are first planted. My dear parents, you are an important part of God’s mysterious call, and I want to recognize that from the start. Read more »

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An ordination journey nears its destination

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Dialog Editor

When Rich Jasper recently traced the course of his life that lead to the priesthood, he said, “As you can see, the Lord writes straight with crooked lines.”

However, in an era when men are often ordained beyond their 20s, Jasper’s vocation path of ardently practicing his faith, teaching it to young people, and sharing it with parishioners and with the needy has had a clear route to the altar in retrospect.

Jasper, 42, will be ordained a priest for the Diocese of Wilmington by Bishop Malooly on May 20 at the Cathedral of St. Peter. Read more »

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Priesthood is never a job, it’s a calling, a vocation

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Dialog Editor

Time was, young people could contemplate their future by thinking about a single job — blue collar, white collar or professional — and know they could depend on keeping it when they found it. Not anymore.

“I think young people today are so aware, they know that our society is not giving that option,” said Father Norman Carroll, director of the diocesan Office of Priestly and Religious Vocations. “They know, these days, that they will have multiple professions. They think about ‘what I want to do with the rest of my life,’ but our culture is not offering that.” Read more »

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Viewpoint: Pray for those who answer the call

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Bishop Malooly and Father Norman P. Carroll, director of the Office of Priestly and Religious Vocations and pastor of St. Elizabeth Church, met with the five current seminarians for the Diocese of Wilmington at St. E’s rectory July 21 for dinner. Read more »

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‘A very happy day for the Diocese of Wilmington’ — Father Lance Martin ordained to the priesthood

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WILMINGTON – Church bells tolled joyfully as a procession or priests and deacons began its way into the Cathedral of St. Peter May 28 for the ordination of Father Lance Martin.

“This is a very happy day for the Diocese of Wilmington. We rejoice,” Bishop Malooly told 33 priests, Father Martin’s fellow seminarians, and a congregation of about 200. The congregation included Father Martin’s parents and two siblings. Read more »

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Meet Father Lance Stirling Martin

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Dialog Editor

 

Every priest’s vocation story is different; the diocese’s newest priest had a slow but confident journey

 

“I knew God was working in my life since I was a little kid,” said Lance Martin, 10 days before he was to be ordained the newest priest for the Diocese of Wilmington by Bishop Malooly.

Though he didn’t grow up a Catholic, he said, “I felt called to the Catholic Church in sixth grade. I used to walk by a church called Immaculate Conception that was between my house and my best friend’s. It was German gothic architecture, red sandstone. It had this weight about it and it had this white statue of the Blessed Mother.” Read more »

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Archbishop Hebda named to head St. Paul-Minneapolis archdiocese

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Catholic News Service

St. PAUL, Minn. — Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda said his Holy Thursday appointment to head the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis highlights the connection between his new role and the Eucharist, priesthood and service.

Pope Francis has named Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda to head the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. Archbishop Hebda, who has been apostolic administrator of the Minnesota archdiocese since last June, is pictured in a 2015 photo. (CNS photo/Dave Hrbacek, The Catholic Spirit)

Pope Francis has named Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda to head the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. Archbishop Hebda, who has been apostolic administrator of the Minnesota archdiocese since last June, is pictured in a 2015 photo. (CNS photo/Dave Hrbacek, The Catholic Spirit)

“It’s the Eucharist that brings us together,” he told The Catholic Spirit, the archdiocesan newspaper. “The bishop is called to be that source of unity in his local church and where that takes place is at the table of the Lord.”

His appointment was announced in Washington March 24 by Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, apostolic nuncio to the United States. It comes nine months after the archbishop was named apostolic administrator of the archdiocese.

Archbishop Hebda, 56, has been at the helm of the archdiocese as it has faced significant challenges, including bankruptcy and criminal and civil charges, since the June 2015 resignation of his predecessor, Archbishop John C. Nienstedt, and Auxiliary Bishop Lee Piche. An installation Mass is being planned for May 13, the feast of Our Lady of Fatima.

Prior to the March 24 appointment, Archbishop Hebda was coadjutor archbishop of Newark, New Jersey, on track to automatically succeed Archbishop John J. Myers when he retires. Archbishop Myers turns 75 in July; canon law requires bishops to turn in their resignation to the pope at that age.

Archbishop Hebda has been dividing his time between Newark and the Twin Cities, but made it clear at the onset of his duties in Minnesota that his priority was the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis as long as he was its apostolic administrator.

The Pittsburgh native called the archbishop appointment to St. Paul and Minneapolis a shock, because he never seriously entertained the idea of staying in Minnesota, he said, even though many in the archdiocese said they hoped he would.

“I … knew that Pope Francis had already given me responsibilities in the Archdiocese of Newark, so really that’s what I’d been thinking of all along,” he said. “Monday evening (March 21) we had our chrism Mass in Newark, so I was already taking notes about what I would hope to do at next year’s chrism Mass. That was 12 hours before the nuncio called.”

Also shocking, he said, was the short time between Archbishop Vigano’s call March 22 and the Holy Thursday announcement of his appointment.

The urgency, he said, was related to the encouragement Pope Francis wanted to show the archdiocese, he said.

“I think the Holy Father really wanted to show his closeness to the archdiocese, which was going to have to go through the Triduum without an archbishop,” he said. “While that’s still going to happen, because I’m not the archbishop until the installation Mass on May 13, the Holy Father’s action was a great encouragement to me and resolved the unsettling uncertainty that so often reigns in the vacant see.”

The archbishop said much of his role has been consumed by administrative duties. However, he hosted 10 listening sessions throughout the archdiocese in October and November to gather information about the archdiocese’s strengths, challenges and hopes for its next archbishop, and compiled a report for Pope Francis to aid his decision making. A delegate from the nunciature, Msgr. Michael Morgan, also attended some of the sessions, calling them unprecedented in the process of selecting a bishop.

Typically, the nuncio seeks confidential input from some local leaders, including laypeople, Msgr. Morgan said, but never before on this scale. “This is the closest the church comes to direct democracy, you might say,” he said at the time.

Archbishop Hebda said he heard a range of views at the listening sessions that offered insights into the life of the archdiocese, which he expects to aid him as he transitions from apostolic administrator to archbishop. They also help him approach the role with humility.

“Remembering the qualities people had indicated that they would be looking for in the next archbishop, I’m somewhat intimidated to have been even considered for the post,” he said. “I remember at one of the sessions, somebody, after hearing all of the characteristics that people were looking for in their next bishop, said, ‘Basically you want this person to be able to walk on water.’ And somebody else piped in, ‘Well, at least not to drown.’ I’m hoping I can at least tread water and try to respond to those expectations.”

Among the challenges he’ll continue to face is the archdiocese’s bankruptcy, which it entered in January 2015 because of mounting claims of clerical sexual abuse, as well as criminal charges it faces related to a case of clerical sex abuse. Under Archbishop Hebda’s leadership, the archdiocese reached a settlement in December with Ramsey County on civil charges related to the same sex abuse case. The charges were filed simultaneously in June 2015.

“It’s a still long road that’s ahead of us. We’ve been … trying to deal with all of these things in a positive way that reflects who we are as church,” he said. “I suspect that other people would be a better judge for how well we’ve done, but can attest that I have experienced a lot of cooperation and even some affirmation. When we entered into the settlement agreement for the civil charges, for example, I had the sense that many people in the archdiocese thought that we were moving in the right direction even though there’s still much that needs to be worked out.”

Prior to his appointment to Newark in 2013, Archbishop Hebda was bishop of Gaylord, Michigan, from 2009 to 2013. From 1996 to 2009, he served in Rome in the Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts, which is responsible for canon law, serving for six years as council undersecretary.

He was ordained a priest in 1989 for the Diocese of Pittsburgh. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Harvard University, a law degree from Columbia University School of Law, and a licentiate in canon law from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome.

Wiering is editor of The Catholic Spirit, newspaper of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis.

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Thirty-three priests celebrate jubilees

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Thirty-three diocesan and religious-order priests are celebrating significant milestones of their ordinations this year.

(Information about six additional Oblate jubilarians previously appeared in the May 15, 2015 issue of The Dialog.)

 

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Guest Commentary: Let priests know they are appreciated and treasured

October 16th, 2014 Posted in Uncategorized, Vocations Tags: , ,

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Oct. 26 is Priesthood Sunday. The Delaware Knights of Columbus and members of the Diocese of Wilmington look forward to this day each year to recognize and celebrate our priests in the Catholic Church for all they do throughout the year and to encourage and pray for vocations to the priesthood.

Parishes each have their own special way of marking this day (cards, personal contacts, Masses, etc.), but each has the same purpose and that is to let our priests know they are very much appreciated, treasured and cherished by their flock. Read more »

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Prayer and laughs: Books offer clues to what makes priests happy

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“Why Priests are Happy: A Study of the Psychological and Spiritual Health of Priests” by Stephen J. Rossetti. Ave Maria Press (Notre Dame, Ind., 2011). 238 pp., $18.95.“Between Heaven and Mirth: Why Joy, Humor and Laughter Are at the Heart of the Spiritual Life” by James Martin, S.J. HarperOne (San Francisco, 2011). 247 pp., $25.99.

Two books published in October reflect on Catholic culture from quite different, unique viewpoints. Brian Welter reviews both books below.

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