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Boys basketball tips off with some good matchups

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Dialog reporter

St. Elizabeth already has two games under its belt, but for the rest of the Catholic schools in Delaware, the season gets going this week. Records are included only for those teams that have played already. Read more »

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Catholic schools ready for state basketball tournament

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For The Dialog

 

The girls’ and boys’ basketball state tournaments start this week, and a bunch of Catholic schools are among the 24 in each vying for the top prize.

 

GIRLS

First Round

Tuesday, all games at 7 p.m.

(23) Friends (12-8) at (10) Archmere (14-6). The Auks open with a home game against an experienced Quakers team. The Quakers start three seniors and two juniors and are a balanced team. Junior Natalie DePaulo leads the team in scoring and will be the focus of the Auks’ defense. The Auks have a mixture of youth and experience; freshman Madison Stewart has improved and is one of the scoring leaders on this team.

Unknown(19) St Thomas More (13-7) at (14) Sussex Central (14-6). The Ravens have a tough road test as they travel to Sussex Central in a first-round matchup. The Ravens are a young team that played all season without the injured Sarah Pool. Aniah Patterson is a dangerous player that could score from anywhere. St. Thomas More beat Sussex Central at home on Jan. 19, 51-40. Patterson led the Ravens with 13 points.

Second Round

Thursday, all games at 7 p.m.

Friends-Archmere winner at (7) St. Elizabeth (13-7). The Vikings earned a first-round bye thanks to a strong finish and a quality schedule. They won 11 of their last 13 games. The Vikings beat Archmere, 45-41, on Feb. 4 as senior Lexi Bromwell scored 10 fourth-quarter basketballpoints. The experienced Vikings also feature seniors Sarah Metz and Alanna Speaks, along with junior Alexis Lee. The Vikings and Quakers did not meet during the regular season.

St. Thomas More-Sussex Central winner at (3) Caravel.

Lake Forest-Milford winner at (1) Ursuline (19-1). The Raiders are the top seed and went unbeaten in the state. They have the best backcourt in the state in Alisha Lewis, Maggie Connolly and Yanni Hendley, and their defense is air-tight. Ursuline didn’t play either Lake Forest or Milford this year, but their challenging schedule should have them ready to advance to the Bob Carpenter Center for the quarterfinal round.

Quarterfinals:

Saturday, times to be determined, Bob Carpenter Center

Delaware Military Academy-Laurel-Sussex Tech winner vs. Lake Forest-Milford-Ursuline winner

Friends-Archmere-St. Elizabeth winner vs. Dover-Howard-Caesar Rodney winner

St. Thomas More-Sussex Central-Caravel winner vs. Delcastle-A.I. DuPont-Concord winner

Delmarva Christian-Hodgson-Conrad winner vs. Mount Pleasant-Cape Henlopen-Sanford winner

 

BOYS

First Round 

Wednesday

(18) Indian River (12-8) at (15) St. Mark’s (15-5), 7 p.m. The Spartans earned a home first-round playoff game with a solid finish to the season. They only lost once at home. The Indians should be prepared to face a solid Spartans defense, and on offense, senior senior Chris Ludman leads the way. If the Spartans are making their three-point shots, they are tough to beat. It will be a contrast of styles, as the Indians like to push the tempo, while the Spartans are the epitome of patience.

Second Round 

Friday, all games at 7 p.m.

Indian River-St Mark’s winner vs. (2) St. Thomas More (17-3), site to be announced. The Ravens had an excellent season against a very tough out-of-state schedule. They will push the ball and look to score early and often. St. Thomas More has multiple weapons, including Greg Bloodsworth and Eric Montanez, who can take over a game. A game against a St Mark’s team that likes to slow things down could be interesting.

(19) Caravel (14-6)-(14) Hodgson (15-5) winner at (3) Salesianum (15-5). The Sals are one of the hottest teams coming into the tournament, winners of eight straight and 10 of 11. They were undefeated at home and will play stingy defense. On offense they can shoot the deep ball well and can also go inside to junior Paul Brown. Hodgson had a strong season; the Silver Eagles and the Sals both have wins over top-seeded Mount Pleasant. Caravel features high-scoring O’Koye Parker.

(22) Laurel (12-8)-(11) Sanford (12-8) winner at (6) St. Elizabeth (13-7). The Vikings are a deep team that finished the regular season with four straight wins. Senior Jordan Money can score from anywhere on the court and can take over any game. He’s got a nice supporting cast that includes Elijah Dockery and Nate Thomas. The Vikings are a good foul shooting team which helps them in close games. St. Elizabeth defeated Sanford, 57-56, on Jan. 12 thanks to a late bucket from Money.

Quarterfinals

Sunday, times to be determined, Bob Carpenter Center

Howard-Appoquinimink-Newark winner vs. Indian River-St Marks-St Thomas Moore winner.

Laurel-Sanford-St Elizabeth winner vs. Caravel-Hodgson-Sallies winner.

Red Lion-Milford- Smyrna winner vs. Lake Forest-William Penn-Woodbridge winner.

Friends-St. Georges Tech-Glasgow winner vs. Cape Henlopen-Caesar Rodney-Mount Pleasant.

Tickets to first- and second-round games will be sold at the individual schools and at the door if any remain. Tickets to the quarterfinals, semifinals and final are available at statechamps.com/clients/diaa. The quarterfinal rounds will be spit into two sessions requiring two tickets.

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Benedictine abbey in England displays St. Thomas More’s hair shirt

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Catholic News Service

BUCKFAST, England — The hair shirt worn by St. Thomas More as he contemplated a martyr’s death in the Tower of London has been enshrined for public veneration.

The folded garment made from goat’s hair was encased above an altar in Buckfast Abbey, a Benedictine monastery in southwest England.

St. Thomas, a former lord chancellor of England, wore the shirt while he was incarcerated in the Bell Tower of the Tower of London while awaiting execution for opposing the Protestant reforms of King Henry VIII.

He was beheaded July 6, 1535, after telling a crowd gathered on London’s Tower Hill that he was “always the king’s good servant, but God’s first.”

An encasement of a hair shirt worn by St. Thomas More as he contemplated a martyr's death in the Tower of London, before his 1535 beheading, is on display at the altar of England's Buckfast Abbey Nov. 18 photo. (CNS photo/Luke Michael Davies, courtesy Buckfast Abbey Media Studios)

An encasement of a hair shirt worn by St. Thomas More as he contemplated a martyr’s death in the Tower of London, before his 1535 beheading, is on display at the altar of England’s Buckfast Abbey Nov. 18 photo. (CNS photo/Luke Michael Davies, courtesy Buckfast Abbey Media Studios)

Benedictine Abbot David Charlesworth told Catholic News Service Nov. 21 that the shirt had not been shown in public before.

He said that although the shirt was a secondary relic, he believed it was of greater significance than a body part, or primary relic, because it was directly linked to the religious convictions of the saint.

“What this relic represents is St. Thomas More’s faith,” Abbot Charlesworth said. “This relic says something about who Thomas More was as a Christian … it is a major relic. It is linked to his life of conversion and his identification with the sufferings of Christ.”

Abbot Charlesworth said St. Thomas was a man of conscience who was “standing up for freedom” against a tyranny that was trying to dictate to people what they could or could not think.

Bishop Mark O’Toole of Plymouth, the diocese in which Buckfast is situated, said he hoped the shrine would become an international pilgrimage destination. He said there was a huge cult dedicated to St. Thomas in countries as diverse as Germany and South Korea.

The bishop noted that St. Thomas also had global significance as the patron of statesmen and politicians, a title bestowed on him by St. John Paul II in 2000, as well as patron saint of lawyers.

St. Thomas was a man who manifested “huge integrity” and faith at a time of crisis, Bishop O’Toole said. He “gives us a pattern of what individuals can do through personal integrity and through the living out of their faith in very concrete and practical ways.”

St. Thomas is recorded as wearing a hair shirt when he was testing a possible vocation to the monastic life at the London Charterhouse, a Carthusian monastery, when he was in his early 20s.

The rough uncomfortable cloth is meant to encourage self-control, to serve as a penance for past sins and to unite the wearer with the passion of Christ.

Although St. Thomas went on to marry and father four children, he continued to wear the shirt in private, sometimes beneath his robes of high office.

He gave up public office when King Henry asserted supremacy over the church in England so he could annul his marriage to Queen Catherine of Aragon and wed Anne Boleyn, his mistress.

St. Thomas was condemned for high treason after he refused to take an oath attached to the Act of Succession, which recognized any children of the marriage of Henry and Anne to be rightful heirs to the throne.

The day before his execution, the saint gave his hair shirt to Margaret Giggs, his adopted daughter, and it remained in her family until 1626, when it was bequeathed to a community of exiled English Augustinian nuns in Louvain, Belgium.

The nuns later relocated to Devon and, when their priory closed in 1983, they handed the shirt to the Diocese of Plymouth.

In 2011, now-retired Bishop Christopher Budd of Plymouth asked the monks of Buckfast to put the shirt on display so it could be venerated by the public. In October, the shirt was placed in a sealed case in a side chapel in the abbey church.

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Girls have busy remaining part of week in sports

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For The Dialog

 

Columbus Day and a deadline have pushed the weekly schedule posting back a few days, but there are still plenty of opportunities to see the Catholic school girls in action in field hockey and volleyball.

Field hockey

Thursday

field hockeySt Elizabeth at Ursuline, 3:45 p.m.

Delmarva Christian (0-6) at St. Thomas More, 4 p.m.
Friday
Conrad at Archmere, 3:45 p.m.
St. Mark’s vs. St. Elizabeth, 3:45 p.m. @ Hockessin Montessori School
Saturday
Newark Charter (3-5) at Ursuline, 11 a.m. The Raiders play their last home game of the year.
Volleyball
Thursday
volleyballPadua at St Elizabeth, 7:15 p.m.
Friday
Archmere at Conrad (5-3), 5 p.m.
St Mark’s at Wilmington Charter (5-2), 5 p.m.
Sussex Tech (4-2) at St. Thomas More (9-0), 5:15 p.m. The Ravens want to stay unbeaten before their match with Padua later this month.
Saturday
Delmar (5-3) at Ursuline, 5 p.m.
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Fortnight for Freedom: Martyrs’ relics linked to today’s threats to religious liberty

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Catholic News Service

BALTIMORE — Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori linked urgent matters of “immigration, marriage and the church’s teaching on sexuality” to a pair of 16th-century martyrs during a June 21 Mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Baltimore that began the fifth annual Fortnight for Freedom.

Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori offers a history of the sacrifices made by Sts. Thomas More and John Fisher during his June 21 homily at the Fortnight for Freedom opening Mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Baltimore. The relics of the two saints, on loan from Stonyhurst College in England, are on a national tour. (CNS photo/Kevin J. Parks, Catholic Review)

Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori offers a history of the sacrifices made by Sts. Thomas More and John Fisher during his June 21 homily at the Fortnight for Freedom opening Mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Baltimore. The relics of the two saints, on loan from Stonyhurst College in England, are on a national tour. (CNS photo/Kevin J. Parks, Catholic Review)

The theme of this year’s fortnight is “Witnesses to Freedom.” It features relics of St. Thomas More and St. John Fisher, an English layman and bishop, respectively, who were martyred in a 16-day span in 1535, when they refused to accept Parliament’s Act of Supremacy, which had declared that King Henry VIII was head of the church in England.

On display for veneration were St. John Fisher’s ring and a piece of bone of St. Thomas More. According to Jan Graffius, curator of Stonyhurst College in England, which holds the relics, it came from St. Thomas More’s skull, which was rescued by his daughter, Margaret, from a spike on London Bridge.

During a Mass that was televised nationally by the Eternal Word Television Network, Archbishop Lori’s homily connected Thomas More and John Fisher to an array of 21st century struggles, among them the Health and Human Services contraceptive mandate that the Little Sisters of the Poor continue to challenge in the nation’s highest courts.

“This night we recognize gratefully the courage of all who are resisting the mandate, especially the Little Sisters of the Poor,” the archbishop said. “They are vigorously defending their freedom and ours –- and they are doing so with a beauty and a joy, borne from the heart of the Gospel.”

Archbishop Lori, who is chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee on Religious Liberty of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which sponsors the Fortnight for Freedom, also asked for prayers for the victims of June 12 mass shooting in Orlando, Florida, and their families.

“We may think that the days of the martyrs have ended,” Archbishop Lori said in his homily, “but as Pope Francis points out, there are more martyrs for the faith in our times than there were during the first centuries of the church.

“We remember with reverence and love those who died for their faith — Jews, Catholics and Protestants -— an ecumenism of blood, as Pope Francis says, during the reign of terror that was Nazism and Communism.

“This night,” he continued, “we draw close to the martyrs of the 21st century in Iraq, Iran, Syria and parts of Africa, those slain for their faith in plain sight of us all with no one to hold their persecutors accountable. Refugees are streaming from the Middle East just as Jews tried to escape from the horrors of Nazism, only to find that they are held suspect and they are unwanted.”

While religious liberty in the U.S. might not seem in such dire straits by comparison, vigilance is required nonetheless.

“We would like to think,” Archbishop Lori continued, “such things could never happen here. … Yet, there are ominous signs that protections for religious freedom have waned as bad laws, court decisions and policies pile up and as the prevailing culture more readily turns away from religious faith.

“Let us be clear that challenges to religious freedom in our nation pale in comparison to those faced by our brothers and sisters in many parts of the world; yet who is served when we fail to take seriously the new and emerging challenges to religious freedom that are before us?

“We may not be called upon to shed our blood,” he continued, “but we are called upon to defend our freedoms, not merely in the abstract, but as embedded in matters such as immigration, marriage and the church’s teaching on sexuality.”

Concelebrants of the Mass included Baltimore Auxiliary Bishop Denis J. Madden, Washington Auxiliary Bishop Martin D. Holley., and dozens of priests from the Archdiocese of Baltimore.

Other Catholic organizations represented included the Knights of Columbus, the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem and the Order of Malta. The second reading was given by Dr. Marie-Alberte Boursiquot, president-elect of the Catholic Medical Association and a basilica parishioner.

June 22 is the feast day for both Sts. John Fisher and Thomas More.

The linking of current threats to religious freedom with the relics of the two saints carried particular resonance for one worshipper.

Jim Landers, a parishioner of St. Ignatius, Hickory, was keenly interested in the St. Thomas More relic. He is originally from Louisville, Kentucky, where his great-great-grandfather, Thomas Lawson Moore, was a U.S. senator whose lineage included Thomas More.

The spelling of the name was altered when his ancestors came to the U.S.

“This Mass, and everything it stands for, is extremely important to me,” Landers told the Catholic Review, Baltimore’s archdiocesan publication. “Beyond that, there’s the family connection. I can’t even describe that. It’s extremely exciting.”

His sentiments are compounded by the fact that Landers was raised Baptist and became a Catholic after attending Mass for years with his wife, Michelle.

– – –

McMullen is managing editor of the Catholic Review, the news website and magazine of the Archdiocese of Baltimore.

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Postseason comes into clearer focus as boys sports move into May

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For The Dialog

 

The season is heating up for the boys as we have reached May and the postseason is around the corner. Read more »

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Showdowns mark boys sports schedule this week

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For The Dialog

 

The boys’ seasons heat up this week with some big rivalry showdowns and important games as we move into the second half. Read more »

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Boys schedule is heavy, but nice weather needed

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For The Dialog

 

The boys schedule heats up this week, but will the weather cooperate? Read more »

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If you blink, you might miss a girls contest this week

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For The Dialog

 

Spring break is over and the action heats up this week in girls sports. Read more »

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U.S. bishops developing pastoral plan for family life, marriage

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Catholic News Service

BALTIMORE — As a way to move forward in response to the Supreme Court’s ruling on same-sex marriage this year, U.S. bishops are planning to develop a pastoral plan for marriage and family life.

The pastoral plan, according to Bishop Richard J. Malone of Buffalo, New York, chairman of the bishops’ Committee on Laity, Marriage, Family Life and Youth, will seek the input of the nation’s Catholic bishops.

Bishop Richard J. Malone of Buffalo, N.Y., speaks during a news conference Nov. 16 during the 2015 fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore. (CNS photo/Bob Roller)

Bishop Richard J. Malone of Buffalo, N.Y., speaks during a news conference Nov. 16 during the 2015 fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore. (CNS photo/Bob Roller)

He spoke about the plan Nov. 16 in Baltimore during an afternoon session at the annual fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone of San Francisco, chairman of the bishops’ Subcommittee for the Promotion and Defense of Marriage, said the Supreme Court’s decision was a “great disappointment,” but it was not unexpected.

In comments from the floor about the court’s decision and how the church should proceed, Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann of Kansas City, Kansas, said Catholic leaders need to approach the court’s decision much like they did the Roe v. Wade court decision legalizing abortion.

Bishop R. Daniel Conlon of Joliet, Illinois, similarly said the court’s decision opened up opportunities for catechesis.

Bishop Jaime Soto of Sacramento, California, said the church also needs to look at economic reasons for why people aren’t marrying and reach out to these couples.

In a report on this year’s observance of the Fortnight for Freedom, Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore, chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee for Religious Liberty, told the assembled bishops that the theme for 2016 will be “Witnesses to Freedom.”

“The fortnight gives us an opportunity to remember those witnesses past and present through the church, witnesses who testify to the meaning of freedom of conscience and the obedience of the truth,” he said.

The two-week event will include a nationwide tour of first-class relics of St. Thomas More and St. John Fisher, both of whom were martyred for their faith. Archbishop Lori said details of the tour have yet to be arranged, but that a schedule will be distributed when it is finalized.

The committee is producing a video on religious liberty that can be used by small parish groups and family gatherings to learn about the importance of religious liberty, the archbishop added.

The video’s release will coincide with 50th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council’s Declaration on Religious Freedom, “Dignitatis Humanae.”

Companion study guides and discussion questions are being developed to coincide with the release, the archbishop said.

The effort is being worked on in conjunction with the Knights of Columbus.

 

Contributing to this story was Dennis Sadowski. Follow Zimmermann and Sadowski on Twitter: @carolmaczim and @DennisSadowski.

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