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Do It Yourself Lent: Feb. 29

February 29th, 2012 Posted in Catechetical Corner

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Here is today’s Do It Yourself Lent reflection:

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Do It Yourself Lent: Feb. 28

February 28th, 2012 Posted in Catechetical Corner

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Here is today’s Do It Yourself Lent reflection:

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Season of repentance: Ash Wednesday, Feb. 22, is the first day of Lent

February 16th, 2012 Posted in Catechetical Corner, Featured Tags: ,

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The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches us that the days of the season of Lent “are intense moments of the church’s penitential practice. These times are particularly appropriate for spiritual exercises, penitential liturgies and pilgrimages as signs of penance, voluntary self-denial such as fasting and almsgiving, and fraternal sharing (charitable and missionary works).” That is a good summation of a very important season of the church year.

Lent begins on Ash Wednesday (Feb. 22 this year) and concludes with the Sacred Triduum that leads to Easter Sunday. Most Catholics know basic things about Lent: they know it is a season that marks a time to repent and turn back to God, they know it’s the season that leads up to holy week and Christ’s passion, and they know about some of the Church disciplines during Lent, such as no meat on Fridays. These are the basic elements of the season, but there is much more to know about Lent and its history. Read more »

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Angels on high: God’s messengers are spiritual beings with free will

February 9th, 2012 Posted in Catechetical Corner, Featured

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Frank Capra was a bad guy, at least when it came to educating people about angels. I’m sure most of you have seen Capra’s movie, “It’s a Wonderful Life,” in which mankind learns that “Every time a bell rings, an angel gets it wings.” That bit of angel lore combined with movies, TV shows and songs about angels have given us a skewed understanding of who or what an angel is.

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Sunday readings: Do we reach out to the rejected of society?

February 8th, 2012 Posted in Catechetical Corner

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By Sister Jeanne Hamilton

Readings for Feb. 12

Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Leviticus 13:1-2,44-46 1; Corinthians 10:31-11:1; Mark 1:40-45

The leper who came to Jesus had a lot of courage. He was not supposed to go near anyone who had healthy skin. And Jesus showed as much courage by touching him. Anyone who did that could be told he was now unfit for society. He would have become like a leper

The news about Jesus having healed Simon’s mother-in-law, and freeing a man from a demon, had probably spread even to the lepers outside town. The man begged Jesus to make him “clean” must have had faith in this preacher who had been walking through Galilee.

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Sunday Scripture: Consider what God wants for you

February 2nd, 2012 Posted in Catechetical Corner, Uncategorized

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Readings for Feb. 5

Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 Job 7:1-4; 6-7; 1 Corinthians 9:16-19; 22-23; Mark 1:29-39

 Today we listen to Job in his misery, sounding very hopeless. He has lost everything — wife, children, extended family, animals, wealth. All is gone and he cries out to God, why? We listen to this reading perhaps asking our own questions of why did this happen to Job since he was such a good man and now he seems in despair.

Perhaps we ponder our own questions of why did misfortune happen to me or to a loved one. Job in all his pain and suffering did not lose hope, he didn’t understand why but he continued to call out to God, he did not turn and walk away from God. What a role model Job is for each one of us. In our journey through life I’m sure there has been a time when you wanted to turn and walk away from God but like Job you stayed or maybe you did turn away and then returned knowing that life without God was impossible. Read more »

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Consider what God wants for you

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Readings for Feb. 5

Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 Job 7:1-4; 6-7; 1 Corinthians 9:16-19; 22-23; Mark 1:29-39

 Today we listen to Job in his misery, sounding very hopeless. He has lost everything — wife, children, extended family, animals, wealth. All is gone and he cries out to God, why? We listen to this reading perhaps asking our own questions of why did this happen to Job since he was such a good man and now he seems in despair.

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Epiphany: The Word made flesh made known to the world

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“We three kings of Orient are bearing gifts we traverse afar.”

It’s in the beautiful hymn “We Three Kings” that most people glean their understanding of the holy day we call “Epiphany.” However, if our only understanding of Epiphany is from that hymn, we are left with an incomplete knowledge of the significance of Epiphany.

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The Word became flesh

December 22nd, 2011 Posted in Catechetical Corner, Featured Tags: ,

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“Et Verbum caro factum est.” (“And the Word became flesh.”) For the better part of 800 years, this statement from the Gospel of St. John was read at the end of Masses as part of what was called “the Last Gospel.” When these words were spoken, the congregation would go from standing to genuflecting. “And the Word became flesh” is a reference to the Son of God, the Second Person of the Trinity, becoming man and dwelling among us. It refers to the conception and birth of Jesus Christ. The word that encapsulates this moment of God becoming man is “incarnation.” This article presents what the church and its tradition puts forth as its understanding of Jesus Christ being God incarnate.

The term “incarnation” carries a specific meaning that can be found in the root of the word itself. “Caro” is the Latin term for “flesh” or “meat.” From this word we get “carnivorous,” which describes an eater of meat. We also get the word “carne” as in “chili con carne” – chili with meat. So, when we say “incarnation” we mean “in the flesh.” It is our faith that Jesus Christ, born to our Blessed Mother Mary, was and is God in the flesh – he is the Word (God, the Son) incarnate. We express this in the Nicene Creed we pray each Sunday at Mass:  “For us men and for our salvation he came down from heaven, and by the Holy Spirit was incarnate of the Virgin Mary, and became man.”

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Advent: Awaiting the savior

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For The Dialog

The season of Advent has arrived, and for the church this is a very special season that prepares us spiritually, eschatologically and logistically for Christ. Spiritually, it focuses us on God coming into world in the flesh (incarnate) at Christmas in the person of Jesus Christ. Eschatologically (meaning looking toward the end-times), it prepares us for the Second Coming of Christ, when he will come not as Savior of mankind, but as its judge. Logistically, it revs up the engine of the new church year during which we worship and celebrate our savior, Jesus Christ. The first Sunday of Advent is our New Year’s Day.

The word Advent is from the Latin “adventus” for “coming” and is the name of the four-week period of preparation leading up to the birth of the Lord on Christmas. Advent always begins on the Sunday nearest the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle (Nov. 30) and it continues through four consecutive Sundays until the start of the first Mass of Christmas celebrated in the evening on Dec. 24.

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