Home » Archive by category 'Vatican News' (Page 7)

Culture of life the only answer to throwaway logic, pope says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — A culture that protects life from conception to natural death is the only answer to the idea that some lives are expendable due to inconvenience or population control, Pope Francis said.

People look at a poster expressing criticism of Pope Francis in Rome Feb. 5. Several copies of the poster were placed in the center of Rome but were quickly covered by city authorities. Several copies of the poster were placed in the center of Rome; some were quickly covered by city authorities. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

People look at a poster expressing criticism of Pope Francis in Rome Feb. 5. Several copies of the poster were placed in the center of Rome but were quickly covered by city authorities. Several copies of the poster were placed in the center of Rome; some were quickly covered by city authorities. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Following in the path of St. Teresa of Kolkata, Christians are called to stand up and defend the lives of the unborn and the vulnerable, the pope said Feb. 5 in his remarks after the recitation of the Angelus prayer.

“We are close to and pray together for the children who are in danger with the termination of pregnancy, as well as for people who are at the end of their lives; every life is sacred,” he said.

The pope commemorated the Day for Life celebration promoted by the Italian bishops’ conference. The theme of the 2017 commemoration was “Women and men for life in the footsteps of St. Teresa of Kolkata.”

Citing Mother Teresa’s call to fight for life, the pope joined the Italian bishops’ appeal for “courageous educational action in favor of human life.”

“Let us remember the words of Mother Teresa: ‘Life is beauty, admire it; life is life, fight for it!’ both for the baby about to be born and the person who is close to death,” he said, repeating again, “Every life is sacred.”

Before reciting the Angelus prayer with pilgrims, the pope reflected on the Sunday Gospel reading in which Jesus tells his disciples they are “the salt of the earth” and “the light of the world.”

While Christians are called to be reflection of Christ’s life “not in words, but by our deeds,” they must also take on the characteristics of salt, which gives “flavor to life with the faith and love that Christ has given us.”

Another fundamental quality of salt that Christians should adopt, he continued, is its ability to preserve from corruption, keeping away “the polluting germs of selfishness, envy and malicious gossip.”

‘Malicious gossip’

Pope Francis’ call for an authentic witness free from gossip and maliciousness came one day after copies of a poster were plastered around the Rome city center criticizing Pope Francis.

Written in Roman dialect and featuring a stern-faced picture of the pope, the poster said: “Ah Francis, you’ve taken over congregations, removed priests, decapitated the Order of Malta and the Franciscans of the Immaculate, ignored cardinals … but where is your mercy?”

The posters, which were placed anonymously, were taken down or covered with a sign that read “illegal posting” by the city of Rome. The Vatican issued no response to them.

The germs of selfishness and gossip, the pope said in his address, “ruin the fabric of communities, which instead should shine as places of hospitality, solidarity and reconciliation.”

 

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

Comments Off on Culture of life the only answer to throwaway logic, pope says

Christian business approach offers second chances, promotes sharing, pope says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — A truly Christian approach to running a business would be modeled after the father in the Gospel story of the prodigal son by giving jobs and a second chance to those who have made mistakes, Pope Francis said.

People walk in Tokyo, Japan, in this 2013 file photo. An economic and business model in line with the Gospel requires business leaders and workers to share their time and their talent, Pope Francis said during a Feb. 4 meeting with the Focolare Movement. (CNS /Kiyoshi Ota, EPA)

People walk in Tokyo, Japan, in this 2013 file photo. An economic and business model in line with the Gospel requires business leaders and workers to share their time and their talent, Pope Francis said during a Feb. 4 meeting with the Focolare Movement. (CNS /Kiyoshi Ota, EPA)

A business plan inspired by “communion,” he said, “is not blocked by the meritocracy invoked by the older son and by many who, in the name of merit, reject mercy.”

Meeting Feb. 4 with hundreds of people involved in the “economy of communion” project of the Focolare Movement, Pope Francis said their business model of promoting co-responsibility, sharing profits and creating jobs can be the leaven needed to promote an economic model where “the rich know how to share their riches and the poor are called blessed.”

Like the father in the Gospel story, he said, “an entrepreneur of communion is called to do everything possible so that even those who make a mistake and leave his house can hope for a job and a dignified income and not find themselves eating with the pigs,” like the younger son.

Even before requiring a sharing of money, an economic and business model more in line with the Gospel requires business leaders and workers to share their time and their talent, the pope said. “Capitalism knows philanthropy, not communion. It simply means giving a part of your profits, but without embracing and touching the people who are receiving those ‘crumbs.’”

“In the logic of the Gospel,” he said, “if one does not give everything, one does not give enough.”

One cannot be a Christian if one worships idols, Pope Francis said, and “one of the most powerful idols is money.”

“Money is important, especially when there is none and it is needed for food, schooling and the future of one’s children,” he said. “But it becomes an idol when it is the aim.”

“When capitalism makes the search for profits its only goal, it risks becoming an idolatrous structure, a form of worship,” he said.

Pope Francis told the business leaders and workers that “the best and most concrete way to ensure money does not become an idol is to share it with others, especially with the poor” and use it to help young people study and find jobs.

Capitalism clearly promotes an “economy that kills” when anything or anyone that does not increase profits is not just tossed aside, but actively hidden from sight, the pope said.

“Airplanes pollute the atmosphere, but with a little bit of the money from the ticket, they will plant trees to compensate for part of the damage created,” he said. “Gambling companies finance campaigns to rehabilitate the pathological gamblers they create.

“And the day that weapons manufacturers finance hospitals to care for the children mutilated by their bombs, the system with have reached its culmination,” he said. “This is hypocrisy!”

Comments Off on Christian business approach offers second chances, promotes sharing, pope says

Pope’s marriage document not up for personal interpretation, cardinal says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — The Vatican’s doctrinal chief said some bishops are interpreting Pope Francis’ document on marriage and family in a way that is not in accordance with Catholic doctrine. Read more »

Comments Off on Pope’s marriage document not up for personal interpretation, cardinal says

Pope: Like expectant moms, live in joyful expectation of embracing God

By

 

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Christian hope isn’t about believing in something that may or may not come true, like hoping tomorrow’s weather will be pleasant, Pope Francis said.

“Christian hope is the expectation of something that already has been fulfilled and that certainly will be attained for each one of us,” that is, knowing Christ died and is truly risen so that all of humanity may gain salvation and live together with God, the pope said Feb. 1 during his weekly general audience.

Pope Francis puts his hand to his ear after asking for a response from the crowd during his general audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Feb. 1. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Pope Francis puts his hand to his ear after asking for a response from the crowd during his general audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Feb. 1. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Continuing a series of talks on Christian hope, the pope looked at St. Paul’s First Letter to the Thessalonians (5:4-11) and what it teaches about the Christian belief in life after death.

The early Christian community at Thessaloniki was firm in its belief in Christ’s resurrection, but trusting in one’s own resurrection and the resurrection of loved ones was a bit harder to grasp, the pope said.

Such doubts and uncertainty still exist today as “we all are a little afraid of dying,” he told those gathered in the Paul VI audience hall.

St. Paul, he said, writes words of encouragement, telling Christians to arm themselves against the onslaught of doubt and difficulties by “putting on the breastplate of faith and love and the helmet that is hope for salvation.”

This kind of hope, the pope said, has nothing to do with wishing for “something nice,” something “that may or may not happen.”

“For example, people say, ‘I hope it will be nice weather tomorrow,’ but we know that it might be terrible weather instead.”

Christian hope isn’t like that, he said. It is belief in “a sure reality” because it is rooted in the real event of Christ’s resurrection and his promise of eternal life with him.

It’s knowing and seeing that “there is a door over there,” he said, pointing to the entryway into the Paul VI audience hall.

“There is a door. I hope to get to the door. What do I have to do? Walk toward the door. I am sure I will make it to the door. That is what Christian hope is like. Being certain that I am walking” with that destination, he said.

Christian hope is living like an expectant mother, the pope said.

“When a woman realizes she is pregnant, she learns to live each day in expectation of seeing her child’s gaze,” he said.

Everyone needs to learn to live each day with this same joyful anticipation – “to live in expectation of gazing at the Lord, of finding the Lord,” he said.

Learning to live in “sure expectation” isn’t easy, but it can be learned, he said.

“A humble, poor heart” knows how to wait, but it is difficult for someone who is “full of himself and his possessions.”

The pope asked everyone to repeat aloud with him St. Paul’s words (1 Thes 4:17) as a way to find peace and consolation, knowing that one day the faithful will be united with God and their loved ones: “Thus we shall always be with the Lord.”

At the end of his main audience talk, the pope greeted members of the Global Catholic Climate Movement, which seeks to act upon the pope’s encyclical “Laudato Si’” and address climate change.

He thanked them for their dedication to “taking care of our common home during this time of serious social-environmental crisis.”

He encouraged them to continue to expand and strengthen their networks “so that local churches may respond with determination to the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.”

 

Follow Glatz on Twitter: @CarolGlatz.

Comments Off on Pope: Like expectant moms, live in joyful expectation of embracing God

Pope encourages Knights of Malta to continue path of renewal

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — As the Sovereign Military Order of Malta accepted Pope Francis’ intervention in their governance, the pope urged members to follow a path of renewal as they prepare to elect a new grand master.

Pope Francis talks with Fra Matthew Festing, grand master of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, during a private audience with members of the order at the Vatican in this June 23, 2016, file photo. Festing has accepted Pope Francis' request that he resign following weeks of tensions with the Vatican over the dismissal of the order's former chancellor, Albrecht Freiherr von Boeselager. (CNS photo/Maria Grazia Picciarella, pool) See FESTING-MALTA-RESIGN Jan. 25, 2017.

Pope Francis talks with Fra Matthew Festing, grand master of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, during a private audience with members of the order at the Vatican in this June 23, 2016, file photo. Festing has accepted Pope Francis’ request that he resign following weeks of tensions with the Vatican over the dismissal of the order’s former chancellor, Albrecht Freiherr von Boeselager. (CNS photo/Maria Grazia Picciarella, pool) 

In accordance with the pope’s wishes, the governing council of the order accepted the resignation Jan. 28 of Fra Matthew Festing as grand master and appointed Fra Ludwig Hoffmann von Rumerstein to temporarily lead the chivalric order.

By “putting aside personal interests and dangerous ambitions,” members, volunteers and benefactors of the order can better dedicate themselves to the “noble and proven mission” of defending the faith and serving the poor, the pope wrote in a Jan. 27 letter to von Rumerstein, lieutenant ad interim of the order.

“The witness of an authentic Christian life makes accompanying the sick more accepted and effective, and charity toward the poor and vulnerable people of society more fraternal,” the pope wrote.

The Knights of Malta have 13,500 members, as well as 80,000 volunteers and 25,000 medical professionals providing relief and humanitarian aid in 120 countries.

Festing offered his resignation Jan. 24 at the behest of Pope Francis, who had established a commission to investigate his removal of the order’s grand chancellor, Albrecht Freiherr von Boeselager.

Festing refused to cooperate with the investigation and insisted the firing was a sovereign act outside the Vatican’s jurisdiction, although the knights take a vow of obedience to the pope.

Pope Francis said he would appoint a special delegate who, in close collaboration with von Rumerstein. will “specifically take care of the spiritual and moral renewal of the order,” especially the 50 or so members who have taken religious vows of poverty, chastity and obedience.

“The special delegate will have the task of being my exclusive spokesman during the period of your mandate for all that relates to the relationship of the order with the Holy See,” the pope wrote.

The pope’s letter did not clarify how the special delegate’s responsibilities would intersect with those of the current cardinal patron of the order, Cardinal Raymond L. Burke.

According the order’s constitution, the cardinal patron “has the task of promoting the spiritual interests of the order and its members and relations between the Holy See and the order.”

Following the acceptance of Festing’s resignation, von Rumerstein expressed his gratitude to him for “the many good things he has done for our order.”

“We are grateful to Fra Matthew in his generous response to the request of the Holy Father to resign his position for the good of the Order of Malta,” he said.

He also thanked the pope and Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Vatican secretary of state, for “their interest in and care for our order.”

“We are grateful to the Holy Father for all his decisions so carefully taken with regard to and respect for the order, with a determination to strengthen our sovereignty. In this and all matters, we will not yield in our loyalty to the pope,” von Rumerstein wrote.

 

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

Comments Off on Pope encourages Knights of Malta to continue path of renewal

Loss of hope and memory of graces shrinks souls, pope says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Christians who do not remember the graces they received by God in the past can lose hope, turning into cowards who buckle in difficult times, Pope Francis said.

A Christian who doesn’t remember the past and hope for the future is a person who “walks down the street and when an

Pope Francis (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Pope Francis (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

unexpected rain falls is wearing clothes of bad quality that shrink,” the pope said Jan. 27 during his Mass at the Casa Santa Marta where he lives.

“Shrunken souls: This is cowardice. This is the sin against memory, courage, patience and hope,” he said.

The pope reflected on the day’s reading from the Letter to the Hebrews (10: 32-39), which called on Christians to “remember the days past when, after you had been enlightened, you endured a great contest of suffering.”

Christian life and even one’s daily spiritual life, the pope said, can’t be understood without “the memory of God’s salvation in my life, the memory of woes in my life.”

“Memory is a grace, a grace to ask for,” he said. “‘Lord, may I not forget your steps in my life, may I not forget the good times, even the bad times, the joys and the crosses.’ The Christian is a person of memory.”

Looking to the future “with the hope of an encounter with the Lord” is also necessary for living a Christian life, he said.

The day’s reading, he said, also reminds Christians to live in the present with “courage and patience,” especially in times of suffering and sin.

“We are all sinners,” he said. “But let us not remain there, stopped, because this does not help us to grow.”

Pope Francis warned that not having memory of the past, hope for the future and patience for the present is the “cowardly” sin of those who “always walk backward, who care for themselves too much, who are afraid of everything.”

“May the Lord help us grow in memory, may he make us grow in hope, may he give us courage and patience every day and may he free us from those things that are cowardly,” the pope prayed.

 

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

Comments Off on Loss of hope and memory of graces shrinks souls, pope says

Women are braver than men, take their advice, Pope Francis says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — The humble counsel of courageous women should never be disregarded but rather embraced as advice full of God’s divine wisdom, Pope Francis said.

Pope Francis poses with members of a musical group during his general audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Jan. 25. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Pope Francis poses with members of a musical group during his general audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Jan. 25. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Women like the biblical heroine Judith are an example of trusting God amid sufferings and difficulties when it is easy to give up hope and fall into despair, the pope said Jan. 25 during his weekly general audience.

“This is my opinion, but women are more courageous than men,” the pope said to applause.

As the pope arrived for the audience, the sounds of classical music echoed throughout the Paul VI audience hall as a youth orchestra from Bolivia played for the pope.

The Anglican choir of London’s Westminster Abbey and former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger also were present and greeted the pope at the end of the audience.

Pope Francis focused his audience talk on Judith, “a woman of great beauty and wisdom,” who reproached the people of Israel for their lack of trust in God to deliver them from foreign invaders.

“They were at the point of saying, ‘God has sold us,’” the pope said. “How many times have we come to situations that test our limits where we are not even able to trust in the Lord? It is an ugly temptation.”

Facing a situation full of despair, the pope continued, the people gave God five days to intervene. However, even in prayer they doubted that the Lord would help them.

“Five days are given to God to intervene; this is the sin! Five days of waiting but already expecting the end. In reality, no one among the people is capable of hoping,” he said.

Pope Francis said that in the moment of despair, Judith confronts the people’s doubts with the “courageous language” of faith and hope.

Her courage, he explained, is a reminder for Christians “to knock on the door of God’s heart; he is a father, he can save us. This widow risks (everything), even of making herself look like a fool in front of the others. But she is courageous, she goes forward.”

Christians must “never put conditions on God,” the pope said. Instead, they should allow “hope to conquer our fears.”

“To trust God means entering into his plans without assuming anything” and to believe that “he knows better than us,” the pope said.

The story of Judith exemplifies the importance of the “courageous counsel” of humble women, Pope Francis said. Their words, he added, contain “the wisdom of God” and should never be “dismissed as ignorant.”

“The words of grandmothers, how many times do grandmothers know the right word to say,” the pope said. “They give words of hope because they have the experience of life, they have suffered so much, they trusted in God and the Lord gave them this gift of giving us hopeful advice.”

 

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

Comments Off on Women are braver than men, take their advice, Pope Francis says

Order of Malta’s grand master resigns at pope’s request

By

Catholic News Service

ROME — After weeks of very public tensions with the Vatican, the head of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta accepted Pope Francis’ request that he submit his resignation.

The order’s communications office confirmed Jan. 25 that Fra Matthew Festing, the 67-year-old grand master, met with Pope Francis the day before and agreed to resign.

Pope Francis met with Fra Matthew Festing, grand master of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, during a private audience last June. This week, Festing resigned at the pope's request.  (CNS photo/Maria Grazia Picciarella, pool)

Pope Francis met with Fra Matthew Festing, grand master of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, during a private audience last June. This week, Festing resigned at the pope’s request. (CNS photo/Maria Grazia Picciarella, pool)

Festing, who has led the world’s largest chivalric order since 2008, will submit his resignation Jan. 28 to the order’s governing council, according to the communications office.

The Order of Malta is made up of some 13,500 knights and dames; more than 50 of them are professed religious, having taken vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. The grand master is elected for life from among the professed knights.

Festing’s offer to resign came after Pope Francis set up a commission to investigate Festing’s removal of the order’s grand chancellor, Albrecht Freiherr von Boeselager.

A member of the commission told Catholic News Service Jan. 25 that Pope Francis received the commission report before meeting with Festing and asking for his resignation.

In a statement in December, the order said Boeselager was removed “due to severe problems which occurred during Boeselager’s tenure as grand hospitaller of the Order of Malta and his subsequent concealment of these problems from the Grand Magistry.” It was widely reported the problems had to do with the distribution of contraceptives to prevent HIV/AIDS in health clinics run by or funded by Malteser International, the order’s humanitarian relief agency.

Festing insisted the removal of Boeselager was an internal matter and, in letters leaked to the press, urged members not to cooperate with the Vatican commission.

In response, the Vatican published a statement Jan. 17 praising “the commendable work that members and volunteers” with the Order of Malta carry out around the world and it urged members to cooperate with the commission for the good of the order and the church.

Comments Off on Order of Malta’s grand master resigns at pope’s request

Pope confirms appointment of Opus Dei prelate

January 24th, 2017 Posted in Vatican News Tags: , ,

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis confirmed the election of Spanish Msgr. Fernando Ocariz as the new prelate of Opus Dei.

The 72-year-old monsignor, who had been auxiliary vicar of Opus Dei, was elected and confirmed by the pope Jan. 23, the first day of voting by Opus Dei’s electoral congress, a gathering of priests and laymen.

Spanish Msgr. Fernando Ocariz, pictured in Rome in 2016, was elected Jan. 23 as the new head of the prelature of Opus Dei. His appointment was confirmed the same day by Pope Francis. (CNS photo/courtesy of Opus Dei)

Spanish Msgr. Fernando Ocariz, pictured in Rome in 2016, was elected Jan. 23 as the new head of the prelature of Opus Dei. His appointment was confirmed the same day by Pope Francis. (CNS photo/courtesy of Opus Dei)

Opus Dei is a personal prelature, which is in some ways like a diocese without geographic boundaries.

Msgr. Ocariz succeeds Bishop Javier Echevarria, who died in December.

Born in Paris in 1944 to a family exiled during the Spanish civil war, Msgr. Ocariz graduated from the University of Barcelona with a degree in physical sciences in 1966.

Prior to receiving his licentiate in theology from Rome’s Pontifical Lateran University in 1969, he lived in Rome in an Opus Dei house along with St. Josemaria Escriva, the Opus Dei founder. He also received a doctorate in theology from the University of Navarra in 1971, the same year of his ordination.

Msgr. Ocariz serves as a consultor to several Vatican offices, including the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, the Congregation for Clergy and the Pontifical Council for Promoting the New Evangelization.

The process that led to Msgr. Ocariz’s election began Jan. 21 with a consultation involving more than three dozen women who are members of the Central Advisory.

The advisory submitted a list with the name or names of those priests in the Opus Dei electoral congress who they believed were suited for the role of prelate.

 

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

Comments Off on Pope confirms appointment of Opus Dei prelate

Church must accompany couples before, after marriage, pope says

By

Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — To ensure engaged couples are entering into a fully Catholic marriage and remain committed to their vows for life, they must be prepared properly beforehand and supported afterward, Pope Francis said.

Addressing members of the Roman Rota, a tribunal handling mostly marriage cases, the pope said the church cannot ignore that there is a “widespread mentality” that is convinced eternal truths do not exist and, therefore, that many young people approaching the church for marriage do not understand what the sacrament is and that it is for life.

Pope Francis talks with Msgr. Pio Vito Pinto, dean of the Roman Rota, and Father Maurice Monier, pro-dean, during a meeting inaugurating the judicial year of the Roman Rota at the Vatican Jan. 21. The Roman Rota is the highest appellate court in the Catholic Church; it mainly handles marriage cases. (CNS photo L'Osservatore Romano, handout)

Pope Francis talks with Msgr. Pio Vito Pinto, dean of the Roman Rota, and Father Maurice Monier, pro-dean, during a meeting inaugurating the judicial year of the Roman Rota at the Vatican Jan. 21. The Roman Rota is the highest appellate court in the Catholic Church; it mainly handles marriage cases. (CNS photo L’Osservatore Romano, handout)

“Such a context, lacking religious values and faith, cannot help but condition matrimonial consent,” one of the essential conditions for a Catholic marriage to be valid, the pope told the Rota members Jan. 21.

The response of the Catholic Church, he said, must be to provide serious preparation for engaged couples and support that would help newlyweds mature in their vocation.

“The objective of this preparation consists in helping engaged couples to know and live the reality of the marriage they intend to celebrate so that they may do so not only validly and lawfully, but also fruitfully,” he said.

Citing Pope Benedict XVI’s last address to the Roman Rota, in which he highlighted the relationship between love and truth, the pope said some seeking marriage participate actively in the church while others “are guided by a more generic religious sentiment.”

Educating young people so they rediscover marriage and family life according to God’s plan, he said, is a first “remedy” to situations where sufficient preparation is lacking.

“In this spirit, I would like to reiterate the need of a ‘new catechumenate’ for marriage preparation,” he said.

Pope Francis explained that, just like a catechumenate period in preparation for baptism as an adult, “marriage preparation can become an integral part of the whole sacramental procedure of marriage, as an antidote that impedes the growth of null or inconsistent matrimonial celebrations.”

A second remedy, he continued, is the church’s presence and formation after marriage to encourage newlyweds in their lives together.

The Christian community is “called to welcome, accompany and help young couples” and care for their spiritual life through the parish’s pastoral ministry, he said.

“Often times, young couples are left to themselves, perhaps for the simple fact that they are seen less in the parish; this is especially true after the birth of children,” the pope said.

It is in those “first moments of family life,” he said, that the church must be even closer to young couples so they “may strive for the beauty of the Christian family, despite the destructive traps of a culture dominated by the ephemeral and the provisional.”

“As I have said several times,” the pope said, “great courage is needed to be married in the times in which we are living. And those who have the strength and the joy of fulfilling this important step must feel the love and concrete closeness of the church near them.”

Prior to their meeting with Pope Francis, the members of the Roman Rota celebrated Mass with Archbishop Angelo Becciu, a top official in the Vatican Secretariat of State, to inaugurate the Vatican court’s judicial year.

In his homily, Archbishop Becciu said that like Jesus, the court officials are surrounded by real people who want to be listened to and who have had an “experience of failure, of pain.”

“The ministry you fulfill in the pope’s tribunal puts you daily in contact not just with letters, but with people marked by human and marital failure; they are awaiting answers of truth and justice by the church,” the archbishop said.

 

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

Comments Off on Church must accompany couples before, after marriage, pope says
Marquee Powered By Know How Media.