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St. Anthony of Padua Church sets dates for ‘Via Crucis’

January 30th, 2018 Posted in Our Diocese Tags: ,

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St. Anthony of Padua Church invites people to participate in its 2018 presentation of the Via Crucis, a live re-enactment of the last days of Christ by area schoolchildren.

The one-hour performance, blending traditional music, pantomime, and the words of the Gospel is staged at 7:30 pm at St. Anthony’s Church, 905 North DuPont Street in Wilmington. Performances are Ash Wednesday, Feb. 14, Friday, Feb. 23, Friday, March 2, Friday, March 9, Friday, March 16, Friday, March 23 and ending on Good Friday, March 30.
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Pope Francis leads thousands in prayer at Rome’s Via Crucis

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Catholic News Service

ROME — Seated atop a hillside overlooking Rome’s Colosseum, Pope Francis presided over the nighttime Way of the Cross, joining thousands of people gathered in prayer.

The solemn torch-lit service April 18 gave powerful voice to the many social and spiritual problems facing the world and to the redeeming power of Christ’s sacrifice for humanity.

Thousands gather outside the Colosseum in Rome April 18 for a nighttime Way of the Cross. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

By passing a bare wooden cross from one group of people to the next in succession, those chosen to lead the Way of the Cross acted as visible representatives of the often-hidden injustices still wounding the world.

Two children held the cross as a reflection was read about the plight of sexually abused minors, and two inmates carried the cross during a reflection on the anguish of imprisonment and torture.

As he did last year, Pope Francis remained on the hillside terrace in silent reflection and prayer as thousands of people, many holding candles, attended the ceremony, which was broadcast by more than 50 television networks around the world.

While he offered a very brief impromptu reflection last year at the end of the ceremony, the pope was not scheduled to speak this year.

Each year, the pope chooses a different person or group of people to write the series of prayers and reflections that are read aloud for each of the 14 stations, which commemorate Christ’s condemnation, his carrying the cross to Golgotha, his crucifixion and his burial.

This year the pope picked Italian Archbishop Giancarlo Maria Bregantini of Campobasso-Boiano, a former factory worker, longtime prison chaplain, champion of the unemployed and fiercely outspoken critic of the Italian mafia.

In the meditations, the archbishop, who belongs to Congregation of the Sacred Stigmata, looked at how the wounds and suffering of Christ are found in the wounds and suffering of one’s neighbors, family, children and world.

For the second station, Jesus takes up his cross, the archbishop criticized the global economic crisis’ grave consequences, like job insecurity, unemployment, suicide among owners of failing businesses and corruption.

A laborer and a business leader carried the cross, “which weighs upon the world of labor, the injustice shouldered by workers,” said the reflection, which was followed by a call for people to respect political life and resolve problems together.

For the fourth station, Jesus meets his mother, two former addicts carried the cross as people meditated on the tears mothers shed for their children sent off to war, dying of cancer from toxic wastelands or lost in “the abyss of drugs or alcohol, especially on Saturday nights.”

For the fifth station, Jesus is helped by Simon of Cyrene to carry his cross, two people living on the street carried the cross as a reflection was read about “finding God in everyone” and sharing “our bread and labor” with others.

For the eighth station, Jesus meets the women of Jerusalem, two women carried the cross, as the meditation deplored domestic violence, “Let us weep for those men who vent on women all their pent-up violence” and to weep for women who are “enslaved by fear and exploitation.”

But compassion is not enough, the archbishop wrote: “Jesus demands more.” Follow his example of offering reassurance and support “so that our children may grow in dignity and hope.”

The archbishop’s meditations had equally strong words about the sexual abuse of children and its cover-up.

Two children carried the cross for the 10th station, Jesus is stripped of his garments, as the reflection crafted an image of the utter humiliation of Jesus being stripped naked, “covered only by the blood which flowed from his gaping wounds.”

“In Jesus, innocent, stripped and tortured, we see the outraged dignity of all the innocent, especially the little ones,” the meditation said.

A family held the cross for a reflection on the need for kindness and shared suffering; two older people carried the cross during a reflection on how age and infirmity can become “a great school of wisdom, an encounter with God who is ever patient.”

Two Franciscan friars from the Holy Land carried the cross during a meditation on Christ emerging from the fear of death as a sign how forgiveness “renews, heals, transforms and comforts” and ends wars.

 

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Via Crucis invites youth to participate in 2012 pageant

December 9th, 2011 Posted in Our Diocese, Youth Tags: , ,

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WILMINGTON — Children from New Castle County and nearby locations in Pennsylvania and Maryland are invited to participate in the 2012 version of the Via Crucis, the annual presentation of Jesus’ passion and death at St. Anthony of Padua Church.
The tradition of Via Crucis (“Way of the Cross”) goes back more than 50 years. It is done in pantomime, accompanied by narration and choir music. The cast is composed entirely of high school and elementary school children.
Those who would like to participate should sign up on Jan. 15 at 2 p.m. at St. Anthony’s, located at Ninth and Dupont streets. Elementary school children must be accompanied by a parent or other adult. It is open to students in any public, private or parochial school, and they need not be Catholic “because Via Crucis is relative to all Christians,” according to St. Anthony’s.
There are no lines to memorize, and everyone is assured a role. Rehearsals will be held on Sunday afternoons until the Sunday before Ash Wednesday. Via Crucis is presented at 7:30 on Ash Wednesday and on Fridays during Lent, including Good Friday. The presentation lasts an hour.
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