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St. Thomas Aquinas meets bluegrass in best-selling album by Dominicans

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WASHINGTON  — Bluegrass music may not be the first thing that comes to mind when people think of Dominicans, but for the 10 Dominican brothers and priests at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington who recently released their debut album, “The Hillbilly Thomists,” the two have a lot in common.

“The life of holiness is the happiest life. It is the good life,” said Brother Jonah Teller, who plays guitar on the album. “I was drawn, and I think a lot of men are drawn, by the joy the brothers exhibit … to be living this life, to be saving our souls, to be drawing closer to Jesus, and to do it with brothers.” Read more »

Diary of #CDOW150th: Giving thanks at St. Peter’s Square

April 20th, 2018 Posted in Featured, Our Diocese, Uncategorized

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TheDialog.org is following the #CDOW150th as 135 people travel for a pilgrimage to France and Rome to commemorate the sesquicentennial of the Diocese of Wilmington.

DESTINATION (Day Five): St. Peter’s Square, Vatican City.

Bishop Malooly, center, and priests on pilgrimage from the Diocese of Wilmington, visit the Pantheon. (Dialog photo/Msgr. Steven Hurley)

HIGHLIGHTS: After breakfast, we bused to St Peter’s Square for a tour of the Scavi, the underground remnants of the necropolis and the sight of the tomb of St Peter located many feet under the main altar of the Basilica.

TODAY’S QUOTE: “We had a wonderful tour of the Scavi. Our guide made it so personal. We were moved to be so close to the bones of St. Peter.”

St. Peter’s Square is a welcoming site for the pilgrimage from the Diocese of Wilmington.

–Cathy Norbury, Church of the Holy Child 

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Mother killed on Southwest flight was firm believer in Catholic schools

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WASHINGTON — Tributes from business leaders and politicians alike described Jennifer Riordan — the 43-year-old passenger who died April 17 from injuries suffered on Southwest Flight 1380 when its engine exploded — as a devoted mother, community leader, mentor and volunteer.

Riordan, a Wells Fargo executive from New Mexico, was a “thoughtful leader who has long been a part of the fabric of our community,” said Tim Keller, the mayor of Albuquerque. Susana Martinez, governor of New Mexico, described her as “an incredible woman who put her family and community first.” Read more »

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Sunday Scripture readings, April 22, 2018

April 19th, 2018 Posted in Catechetical Corner, Uncategorized

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Fourth Sunday of Easter
Cycle B
1) Acts 4:8-12
Psalm 118:1, 8-9, 21-23, 26-29
2) 1 Jn 3:1-2
Gospel: Jn 10:11-18
 

A good shepherd

Deep below the Eternal City, Rome, lie several early Christian images of Jesus. One remarkable third-century fresco discovered in the Roman catacomb of Priscilla portrays Jesus as the Good Shepherd. And we are led to ask, Why did the early Christians opt to depict this Gospel image of Jesus? 
For the early Christians, the image of Jesus the Good Shepherd was a visual summary of their faith in Jesus for it expressed in visual form what the first Christians understood as the meaning of Jesus’ life, death and resurrection. 

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Christian pilgrims to Holy Land get tattoos to mark their pilgrimages

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JERUSALEM — Three generations of the Razzouk family busily attended to Christian pilgrims and tourists packed into a tiny shop to get Christian tattoos to mark their pilgrimages to the Holy Land.

The Razzouk family has been tattooing Christian pilgrims in the Holy Land for 500 years — and 200 years before that in Egypt. One of their ancestors, Jeruis, was a Coptic pilgrim to the Holy Land five centuries ago; he fell in love with the land and decided to stay and used his tattooing skills to make a living. The art of tattooing was passed down through the generations, with the methods adapting themselves to the times. Read more »

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Caritas Syria: Air strikes reopened wounds, but agency still able to help

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AMMAN, Jordan — Caritas Syria said the recent massive missile strikes by the United States, Britain and France, intended to weaken Syria’s chemical weapons capability, have not hindered its assistance to the country’s poor and internally displaced. 

“We have enough pain in our lives, we don’t need any more,” said Sandra Awad, communications director for the Catholic aid agency Caritas Syria, adding that such intervention does not solve the crisis.  Read more »

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Diary of #CDOW150th: Walking in footsteps of patron saint

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TheDialog.org is following the #CDOW150th as 135 people travel for a pilgrimage to France and Rome to commemorate the sesquicentennial of the Diocese of Wilmington.
DESTINATION (Day 3): It’s always good advice to bring good walking shoes. After breakfast, pilgrims gathered in their hotels (we are spread out among three hotels in Annecy) and departed for a two-hour walking tour of this beautiful city, “the Venice of the Savoy.”
HIGHLIGHTS: Local guides took CDOW visitors to the Church of Saint Francis de Sales, the Cathedral of St. Peter and various sites where SFdS and Saint Jane de Chantal lived, worked, and prayed. This evening, we gather at the Basilica of the Visitation, for Mass in the presence of the relics of these two saints.
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Diary of #CDOW150th: Travel hiccups at outset of pilgrimage

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TheDialog.org is following the #CDOW150th as 135 people travel for a pilgrimage to France and Rome to commemorate the sesquicentennial of the Diocese of Wilmington.

TODAY’S DESTINATION (Day Two): Philly to London to Geneva to Annecy.

HIGHLIGHTS: If patience is a virtue, give special kudos to one of two planes carrying pilgrims that was delayed on the tarmac in London for nearly two hours. Despite airline delays and faux pas, pilgrims spirits remain (mostly) high on Day 2. Two flights left Philadelphia for Heathrow Airport on Monday evening. Flight number one was delayed on the London tarmac for close to two hours, resulting in missing connections to Geneva. About 80 percent of the Diocese of Wilmington sesquicentennial passengers on flight number two arrived in London to learn that their tickets to Geneva had been inexplicably cancelled. Many of the pilgrims will be hours late in arriving in Annecy. Read more »

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Diary of #CDOW150th: Group celebrates Mass, boards buses to airport

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TheDialog.org is following the #CDOW150th as 135 pilgrims take off Monday, April 16 for a pilgrimage to France and Rome to commemorate the sesquicentennial of the Diocese of Wilmington.

TODAY’S DESTINATION (Day One): Church of the Holy Child, Naamans Road, Wlimington.

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Marriage in the church

April 16th, 2018 Posted in Uncategorized

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Marriage existed long before Christianity, so we might ask ourselves: Did Christianity do anything to transform marriage, to make it distinct from what had come before?

And in our cultural context today, we might ask ourselves a similar question: Is Catholic marriage in any way distinct from the other marriages we see in our world?

St. Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians answers these two questions with a resounding YES. Paul begins his fifth chapter by discussing how Christians are called to live in love: “So be imitators of God, as beloved children, and live in love, as Christ loved us and handed himself over for us as a sacrificial offering to God for a fragrant aroma” (Eph 5:1-2).

Christ’s life, death and resurrection transformed everything about how to live. Thus it is no surprise that marriage, despite predating Christianity, also took on a new meaning, which Paul is eager to explain.

Marriage is a distinct way of “living in love.” It is a way of “making the most of the opportunity,” as Paul says in verse 16.

This perception of marriage is a far cry from the institution of convenience, usefulness or pleasure. Rather, it is a call to service of Christ in a particular context with its own specific demands of running a Christian household and raising children to serve the Lord.

As husband and wife share the common purpose of loving and serving God, they are united in a unique way, finding in each other a call to embody Christ’s sacrificial love as they pursue holiness in their marriage and thus their lives together.

Paul speaks of the great mystery of the unity of Christ and the church. Christ loved the church to the point of death on the cross, and in his death, all his followers became part of his body, such that the church is the body of Christ.

Quoting Genesis, Paul states, “a man shall leave father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh” (Eph 5:31). This is an important instruction about the reality of marriage, which has greater significance given the relationship of Christ and the church.

The marriage relationship can be a source of great joy and comfort, but it also entails difficulty and sacrifice, just as does Christian life more generally.

When undertaken together in the Christian spirit of living in love, even these sacrifices and sufferings can be transformed and become a source and sign of unity.

In the Catholic sacrament of marriage, we find something different than the concept of marriage that preceded it. Paul’s description indicates something new and distinct, characterized by a common goal of Christian love and service and inspired by Christ’s own love and sacrifice for the church.

There is consolation in the knowledge of shared love for Christ, as well as challenge found in the struggle to love as Christ loved; both the Eucharist and confession provide strength for this journey, making unity possible.

— Maria C. Morrow

(Morrow is the mother of six and adjunct professor of Catholic studies at Seton Hall University in New Jersey.)

 

• • •

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

A new Catholic storytelling podcast, “Made for Love,” launched Jan. 8.

Produced and narrated by Sara Perla, program specialist for the Promotion and Defense of Marriage at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the podcast explores themes of marriage and family life by telling the stories of Catholics who are “living out the call to love.”

Perla created the podcast because she “saw a unique opportunity to make the stories of Catholics come alive” and plans to highlight the stories of lay Catholics as well as hear from bishops, priests and religious.

The first episode, “The Baptism Role Reversal,” tells the tale of a priest who, in an unusual turn of events, baptizes his parents.

In the second episode, “When Love Meets Silence,” listeners hear the story of Terri and Vince, a married couple challenged by Vince’s rare and debilitating illness.

The third episode, “When Love Is Not Love,” discusses the complexities of annulment in the Catholic Church through the true story of Stacy and Nabil.

Perla said that episodes in February will cover “the power of the family table,” i.e., families eating together, and domestic abuse. 

Find the podcast online at www.marriageuniqueforareason.org/podcast/ and on iTunes under USCCB Clips.

 

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