Home » Archive by category 'Uncategorized' (Page 3)

Mass formally opens canonization cause for Black Elk

By

 

PINE RIDGE, S.D.  — During a Mass to formally open the sainthood cause for Nicholas W. Black Elk, the Native American was described as someone who merged the Lakota and Catholic culture in a way “that drew him deeper into the mystery of Christ’s love and the church.”

Black Elk’s love for God and Scripture led him to become a catechist, fulfilling the mission of all disciples, said Bishop Robert D. Gruss of Rapid City in his homily at the Oct. 21 Mass at Holy Rosary Church in Pine Ridge. Read more »

Comments Off on Mass formally opens canonization cause for Black Elk

Viewpoint: Life’s unfinished symphony

November 2nd, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized Tags: , ,

By

Catholic News Service

 

Fall has arrived. A heavy fog hangs over the city like a damp blanket that someone took out of the dryer too soon.

People love spring for good reasons: There’s rebirth, renewal, the return of light and warmth.

But fall has its gifts. We look forward to hunkering with a good book. Mornings on the patio yield to hot coffee inside after the early morning walk.  Read more »

Comments Off on Viewpoint: Life’s unfinished symphony

TV Review: The Long Road Home

By

 

 

‘The Long Road Home,’ Nov. 7, National Geographic Channel

NEW YORK  — In 2004, soldiers from the Army’s First Calvary Division stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, were deployed on a “peacekeeping” mission to the Sadr City neighborhood of Baghdad. 

This was more than a year after President George W. Bush had declared “Mission Accomplished” in the Iraq War, and Sadr City was reputed to be “the safest place” in that troubled nation. Read more »

Comments Off on TV Review: The Long Road Home

Ursuline needs overtime, defeats Charter in field hockey regular-season finale

November 2nd, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized

By

Dialog reporter

 

WILMINGTON – Ursuline’s field hockey team entered its regular-season finale on Nov. 1 trending in the wrong direction. The Raiders had lost three straight, and with a postseason berth likely coming this weekend, they could ill afford another setback. Read more »

Comments Off on Ursuline needs overtime, defeats Charter in field hockey regular-season finale

Catholics worldwide find strength in popular devotions

October 27th, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized

By

Catholic News Service

           

Three times during October, tens of thousands of people pour into the narrow downtown streets of Lima, Peru, accompanying the figure of the Lord of the Miracles in a procession around the city. The devotion, one of the largest in Latin America, is also celebrated in cities such as Los Angeles and Rome.

“In Latin America, popular piety is part of the culture,” says Rafael Luciani, a Venezuelan lay theologian at Boston College. “There is a personal relationship between the person and God through the image that is carried in a procession or is in the church or the home.” Read more »

Comments Off on Catholics worldwide find strength in popular devotions

Devotions help Catholics find God in daily life

October 27th, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized

By

Catholic News Service

           

Weekly Mass offers a wonderful way to strengthen our spiritual lives by sharing the Eucharist with our Catholic brethren. The challenge is how to sustain that liturgical experience throughout the week as we face the challenges of life.

Like a midafternoon snack that keeps us going until dinner, spiritual devotions can nourish and support our faith journey. Whether it’s a novena, a rosary or praying to a favorite saint, these devotions can help us deepen our prayer life. Read more »

Comments Off on Devotions help Catholics find God in daily life

A devotional life will not leave us as it found us

October 27th, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized

By

Catholic News Service

           

An older man, out in the morning for his first mile-and-a-half walk of the day, silently recites the Jesus Prayer: “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me” — or, “have mercy on me, a sinner.”

At about the same time of day, somewhere a mother and her toddler are driving to their parish to participate in its biweekly mothers’ group. Prayer, spiritual reflection and conversation about parenthood’s challenges and rewards lie at the heart of such groups’ activities. Read more »

Comments Off on A devotional life will not leave us as it found us

Living Our Faith: Devotions and popular piety

October 27th, 2017 Posted in Uncategorized

By

 

Popular devotional practices are not a substitute for the liturgical life of the church;

People gather in Lima, Peru, Oct. 19, 2014, to celebrate the “Lord of the Miracles.” The devotion is organized by a lay confraternity — a characteristic of popular religious devotions. (CNS photo/ Enrique Castro-Mendivil, Reuters)

rather they extend it into daily life.

The aim of devotions — like the Stations of the Cross, prayers to a saint, eucharistic adoration, novenas, the rosary — prompts us to expand as persons.

Around the globe, popular piety becomes part of the culture. Thousands participate in pilgrimages to shrines and processions.

Comments Off on Living Our Faith: Devotions and popular piety

‘Suburbicon’ home of middle-class depravity

By

Catholic News Service

Corruption lurking under the placid surface of life in the suburbs is hardly a new theme.

But the image of universal middle-class depravity presented in the failed black comedy “Suburbicon” is so lurid as to render the movie fundamentally unbelievable. While the filmmakers’ artistic intent is clear, moreover, this nihilistic outlook may make the picture offensive to many viewers of faith.

Alex Hassell, Glenn Fleshler and Jack Conley star in a scene from the movie “Suburbicon.” The Catholic News Service classification is L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. (CNS/Paramount Pictures)

Set in the Levittown-like housing development of the title during the early 1950s, the grotesque story is partially told from the point of view of preteen Nicky Lodge (Noah Jupe). Placing a child at the center of such a tale proves the first of many questionable artistic and ethical choices involved in this project.

Early on, Nicky is awakened in the middle of the night by his father, Gardner (Matt Damon), and discovers that his family — including his wheelchair-bound mom, Rose (Julianne Moore), and Rose­’s twin sister, Margaret (also Moore) — are the victims of a home invasion.

The duo of brutish intruders (Glenn Fleshler and Alex Hassell) who, for reasons unknown, have taken the clan captive then proceed to tie them up and administer chloroform to each deliberately, and fatally, overdosing Rose.

In the wake of this unexplained tragedy, Gardner invites Margaret to move in with him and Nicky, ostensibly to provide Nicky with a female presence in his life. As soon becomes apparent, however, Gardner’s real motives in setting up this arrangement are far less respectable.

Nicky remains confused by what he discovers about Dad and Margaret’s behavior, including his interruption of them in the middle of perverse sex. But their actions strike the police officer (Jack Conley) and insurance investigator (Oscar Isaac) assigned to the case as unmistakably suspicious.

Awkwardly intertwined with the main plot is a cautionary tale about intolerance that sees the community’s first black couple, the Meyers (Karimah Westbrook and Leith M. Burke), and their young son, Andy (Tony Espinosa), besieged by angry white mobs intent on driving them out of the neighborhood.

Along with Nicky’s Uncle Mitch (Gary Basaraba), steadfast, dignified Mrs. Meyers is the only significant adult character who seems to possess any moral values whatsoever.

Director George Clooney, who co-wrote the script with brothers Joel and Ethan Coen and Grant Heslov, paints a perversely dark picture of human nature from which, in the case of Gardner at least, even the most basic positive instincts are absent. His film also displays an elitist disdain for the lives of ordinary people.

In these respects, “Suburbicon” can be contrasted with the Coens’ equally ebony-hued but softer-edged 1996 sendup “Fargo.” While both movies concern bumbling and easily unraveled criminality, the protagonist of the earlier film was more desperate than evil. And his downfall was brought about by an easy-to-laugh-at, yet in many ways admirable adversary.

As bleak as wintry “Fargo” may have been, the spiritual landscape of “Suburbicon” is an unrelieved, and therefore unrealistic, stretch of utter desolation, with two innocent children dangerously lost in its midst.

The film contains a skewed outlook, occasionally shocking violence with considerable gore, some gruesome images, brief aberrant sexual behavior, profanity as well as several crude terms. The Catholic News Service classification is L, limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R, restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

     

 

Comments Off on ‘Suburbicon’ home of middle-class depravity

Viewpoint: A time to remember and celebrate those who have gone before

By

 

In the upcoming days there will be commemorations and celebrations in memory of the dead. Beginning Oct. 31 through Nov. 2, those of Mexican descent will gather in homes and in cemeteries to remember their deceased loved ones in Day of the Dead celebrations. The last day of this celebration, Nov. 2, is the Catholic commemoration of All Souls Day.

In the Philippines, the natives have a unique way of remembering their dead on Nov. 1 and 2 every year. Read more »

Comments Off on Viewpoint: A time to remember and celebrate those who have gone before
Marquee Powered By Know How Media.