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Saints of the Day: Crispin and Crispinian

October 25th, 2017 Posted in Catechetical Corner Tags:

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Saints Crispin and Crispinian

Feast Day: October 25

Legends claim these martyrs were third-century missionaries from Rome who preached the Gospel at Soissons, in Gaul, where they worked at shoemakers.

In British tradition they fled France for England because of persecution.

The saints, whose relics may have been enshrined in Soissons and in Rome, are remembered as the patrons of shoemakers and other leather workers.

Shakespeare immortalized Crispin in “Henry V,” in the king’s St. Crispin’s Day speech, rallying his “band of brothers” before the battle of Agincourt.

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Saint of the Day: John of Capistrano

October 23rd, 2017 Posted in Catechetical Corner Tags:

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John of Capistrano

St. John of Capistrano

Feast Day:  Oct. 23

This Italian studied law in Perugia, where he married the daughter of a leading family and became governor of the city in 1412.

Imprisoned during a civil war, he had a vision of St. Francis, followed by a spiritual conversion.

Dispensed from his marriage vows, John joined the Friars Minor in 1416 and was ordained four years later.

Going barefoot and wearing a hair shirt, he became a great preacher, worked diligently to reform the Franciscan orders, served as the friars’ vicar general and was named papal legate in a number of places in Europe and Palestine.

He also led a wing of the Christian army in a victory against the Turks who besieged Belgrade in 1456.

John is the patron of jurists and military chaplains.

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Saint of the Week: John Paul II

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Saint John Paul II

Feast Day: October 22

When this popular pope died in 2005, crowds in St. Peter’s Square chanted “santo subito” (“sainthood now”).

Pope John Paul II(CNS photo/Joe Rimkus Jr.)

The Vatican heard, and the sainthood cause for the jet-setting pontiff who helped bring down European communism was put on the fast track; he was beatified in 2011 and canonized in 2014.

A Pole and former actor shaped by World War II and the Cold War, Cardinal Karol Wojtyla of Krakow was the first non-Italian pope in 455 years.

In his 26-year pontificate, he evangelized on trips to 129 countries, upheld traditional church doctrine against dissent, connected with the world’s youth, and named more than 450 new saints.

He also modeled Christian values by forgiving his would-be assassin and living an increasingly frail old age in public.

His feast is celebrated on the anniversary of his papal inauguration, Oct. 22, rather than the traditional date of death which is used for most saints.

 

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Saint of the Day: Isaac Jogues

October 19th, 2017 Posted in Catechetical Corner Tags:

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Isaac Jogues

Feast Day: October 19

Born in Orleans, France, Isaac joined the Jesuits at a young age and was sent to his order’s North American mission in 1636.

St. Isaac Jogues (Wikimedia Commons)

He and Rene Goupil were captured and tortured by a band of Iroquois in 1642.

Rene was killed and Isaac was held as a slave until his rescue by Dutch settlers.

He returned to France, secured permission to continue saying Mass despite mutilated hands, and returned to Canada in 1644.

He and John Lalande were tomahawked and beheaded by Huron Indians who invited them to a meal.

These three and five others, the North American martyrs, are patron saints of Canada and North America.

They share this feast and shrines in New York State and Ontario, Canada.

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Saint of the Day: St. Luke

October 18th, 2017 Posted in Catechetical Corner Tags:

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St. Luke

Feast Day: October 18

Early historians said this author of the third Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles was born to a pagan family in Antioch

“St. Luke Painting the Madonna,” by Jan Gossaert (Wikimedia Commons)

(Turkey) and converted to Christianity.

According to Paul’s letters and Acts, he was a doctor and Paul’s companion during his later journeys and imprisonment in Rome.

Luke’s New Testament writings in Greek were for gentiles, extending to them the salvation promised to Israel.

He is the patron of physicians and surgeons and, because of a legend that he painted a Marian icon, of painters.

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Saint of the Day: Ignatius of Antioch

October 17th, 2017 Posted in Catechetical Corner Tags:

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St. Ignatius of Antioch

Feast Day: October 17

This Syrian-born martyr, who gave himself the nickname “God-bearer” because of his certainty of God’s presence within him and who may have been a disciple of St. John the Evangelist, became bishop of Antioch about 69.

St. Ignatius of Antioch (CNS)

Eventually he was arrested and sent to Rome, where his strong desire for martyrdom was fulfilled when he was thrown to the lions in the Colosseum.

In seven letters written to Christians in Asia Minor and Rome, he stressed the need to heal church conflicts, the authority of local bishops and the Eucharist as a source of unity.

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Saint of the Day: Hedwig of Silesia

October 16th, 2017 Posted in Catechetical Corner Tags:

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St. Hedwig of Silesia

Feast Day: October 16

A laywoman from Bavaria, in southern Germany, Hedwig married the duke of Silesia, in southern Poland.

Henry I encouraged his wife’s numerous charitable activities, one of which was founding an abbey of Cistercian nuns at Trzebnica.

The couple vowed to live chastely after their seventh child was born in 1209.

When Henry died in 1238, Hedwig moved to the abbey, where her daughter Gertrude was abbess, but without becoming a nun.

She used her fortune to aid the poor and suffering nearby, and is remembered for increasing German influence in Silesia.

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Saint of the Day: Teresa of Avila

October 15th, 2017 Posted in Catechetical Corner Tags:

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Teresa of Avila

Feast Day: October 15

In Castilian Spain, Teresa was born to a wealthy family and educated in an Augustinian convent.

St. Teresa of Avila by François Gérard (Wikimedia Commons)

Eschewing marriage, she entered the Carmelites in 1536.

She began to practice contemplative prayer during a long illness, and grew dissatisfied with the bigness and worldly distractions of her convent.

After a “second conversion” in 1555, she founded the reform-minded Discalced Carmelites and wrote several books.

For her contribution to mystical theology and Christian spirituality, Teresa was named a doctor of the church in 1970.

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Saint of the Day: Callistus I

October 14th, 2017 Posted in Catechetical Corner Tags:

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St. Callistus I

Feast Day: October 14

According to St. Hippolytus, this Roman native was a salve condemned to Sardinia’s salt mines because he mishandled a banking operation for his Christian master.

Afterward he lived in Anzio, and was made a deacon and administrator of the Appian Way Christian cemetery by Pope Zephyrinus, whom he succeeded in 217.

As pontiff, he was criticized for readmitting to the church, following suitable penance, those guilty of adultery, fornication and apostasy under persecution.

He may have died in a popular uprising, ad was venerated as a martyr.

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Saint of the Day: Edward the Confessor

October 13th, 2017 Posted in Catechetical Corner Tags:

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Edward the Confessor

Feast Day: October 13

St. Edward reigned as king of England from 1042 to 1066.

Biographers describe his natural gifts of patience, caution, and flexibility, which equipped him for effective governance.

King Edward the Confessor
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
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Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Edward defended the country from external enemies and protected his authority from his internal opponents.

Thus, in 1066 he left his successor a country that was more peaceful, united, and stable that it was when he became king.

Edward showed his holiness in his care for the poor and generosity to the church.

He was also known for his miracles. For example, water in which he had washed his hands healed people of skin diseases and epilepsy.

Edward was so popular that for a long time he was celebrated as a patron saint of England.

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